Fried Pickle Chips? Lay's Is Releasing New Flavors Based on Regional Food Flavors

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iStock

Lay's—the beloved brand that created potato chip flavors like chicken and waffles, cinnamon bun, and cappuccino—is now releasing a series of eight new potato chip flavors inspired by regional American delicacies.

Among those flavors are Chicago deep dish pizza, New England lobster roll, Midwestern fried pickles with ranch, and Southern pimento cheese, the New York Daily News reports. According to a press release, the new flavors will only be available from July 30 through September 23 in stores in the regions that inspired them. So, unfortunately, you won’t be able to find Cajun spice potato chips at a store in Utah or Maryland crab spice at a store in North Dakota, but they're available online at Lay's website if you want to try them all.

All eight flavors were featured in a video on Food Network personality Hannah Hart's YouTube channel, who is partnering with Lay's on a potato chip road trip through America.

"I've seen firsthand how proud people can be of their hometown ingredients that have been used for generations," Hart said in a press release, "and I'm looking forward to hit the road with Lay's to connect with locals firsthand and celebrate their flavors!"

Along with the eight new regional flavors, Lay's is also bringing back four regional chip flavors from past limited-edition runs. Those four flavors—West Coast truffle fries, bacon wrapped jalapeno popper, fried green tomatoes, and ketchup—will only be available in stores in their respective regions.

Check out the full list of new flavors below:

Cajun spice (Gulf Coast): Described as featuring a mix of spices like garlic, paprika, onion, and oregano.

Chile con queso (Texas, Oklahoma, Mountain states, Southern California): Inspired by Southwest Tex-Mex flavors.

Crab spice (Mid-Atlantic): Inspired by crab shacks on the Chesapeake Bay.

Deep dish pizza (Heartland and Mid-America): Inspired by Giordano’s famous deep dish pizza recipe.

Fried pickles with ranch (Midwest): Inspired by the fried fare available at Midwestern state fairs.

New England lobster roll (Northeast): Inspired by lobster shacks in Maine and Massachusetts.

Pimento cheese (Southeast): Described as tasting like sharp cheddar with a hint of cayenne pepper.

Thai sweet chile (Pacific Northwest): Inspired by the food truck scene in Portland and Seattle.

[h/t New York Daily News]

The Disputed Origins of Publix’s Chicken Tender Subs

Josh Hallett, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0
Josh Hallett, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

After Popeyes released its new chicken sandwich last week, a heated battle broke out on Twitter over which fast food chain offers the best one. Favorites included Chick-fil-A, Wendy’s, and KFC, but the Publix chicken tender sub was mostly absent from the dialogue. Maybe it’s because Publix is a supermarket rather than a fast food restaurant, or maybe the southern chain is too specific to Florida and its neighboring states to warrant a national ranking.

Either way, the chicken tender sub is a cult culinary classic among Publix customers—there’s even an independently run website devoted to announcing when the subs are on sale (they aren’t right now), and affiliated Facebook and Twitter accounts with tens of thousands of followers. So whom do sub devotees have to thank for inventing the Publix food mashup from heaven? A Facebook user named Dave Charls says, “Me!,” but Publix begs to differ.

The Tampa Bay Times reported that in May of this year, a man named Dave Charls posted a message on the “Are Publix Chicken Tender Subs On Sale?” Facebook page recounting his origin story for the menu item, which allegedly took place in 1997 or 1998. At Charls explains it, he and his co-worker Kevin convinced their friend Philip, a deli worker at the Fleming Island Publix location, to assemble a sub with chicken tenders and ring it up as one item—something that deli workers had refused to do for Dave and Kevin in the past. According to Dave, Philip then convinced his manager to make it a special, publicized it via chalkboard sign, and the idea spread like hot sauce.

“You’re welcome,” Charls said. “It was actually Kevin’s idea and Philip brought it to life.”

Publix, however, told the Tampa Bay Times that its recorded documentation for a chicken tender sub recipe and procedure goes all the way back to 1992 or 1993. Based on that information, Publix spokesperson Brian West confirmed that Charls's heroic account of the origin is more fairytale than fact (though West, unfortunately, doesn’t have an equally thrilling origin story—or any story at all—with which to replace it).

Charls didn’t respond to a request from the Tampa Bay Times for comment, so we may never know how much of his claim is actually true. It’s possible, of course, that Publix’s 1992 (or 1993) chicken tender sub recipe hadn’t gained momentum by the time Kevin’s moment of culinary genius struck in 1997 (or 1998), and the lack of date specificity suggests that neither party knows exactly how it went down. What is incontrovertible, however, is the deliciousness of Publix's beloved sub sandwich.

"I'm just happy to live in the same timeline as this beautiful sandwich," says die-hard Pub Sub fan (and Mental Floss video producer/editor) Justin Dodd. “Copyright claims aside, it's truly a wonderful thing."

This London Pub Might Be the Most Ethical Bar in the World

Ridofranz/Getty Images
Ridofranz/Getty Images

Pub owner Randy Rampersad is doing his part for sustainability. In June, he opened the Green Vic—a play on the fictional Queen Vic pub in the soap opera EastEnders—in the East London neighborhood of Shoreditch. The Telegraph reports it’s aiming to be the world’s most ethical pub: Rampersad eschews plastic and paper straws and opts for gluten-free wheat “straws.” He sources the bar's 100 percent recycled toilet paper from green-minded company Who Gives a Crap, and the communal wooden tables are upcycled.

“I wanted to make the world a better place and run my own business, but I was waiting for that eureka moment,” Rampersad told The Telegraph. He discovered no one had done anything like this before.

There’s no meat on the menu—the food is totally vegan, healthy-ish pub grub. You can add CBD oil to the “chkn" bites appetizer, and the burgers are made from ingredients like soy, seaweed, and sweet potato. The beers are produced by ethical brewers, too: Toast Ale uses unsold loaves and crusts of bread; Good Things Brewing crafts its beer from 100 percent renewable energy; South Africa’s Afro Vegan Cider donates money to an organization that funds equal pay for female farmers; and Brewgooder donates to water projects.

In fact, everything the Green Vic does has charity in mind. “We don't care about the money, I’m planet first and profit after,” Rampersad told The Telegraph. Up to 80 percent of its profits will go to charitable causes, including local food banks. As for the staff, one in four are from marginalized groups. The Green Vic plans to operate as a three-month pop-up pub while scouting for longer term investment.

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