Peanuts Are Making Their Final Departure From Southwest Airlines

iStock
iStock

Southwest Airlines—the commercial flying juggernaut that made peanuts an airplane staple 47 years ago—is now doing away with them for good. Starting August 1, the airline will no longer offer peanuts on any of its flights.

According to the company, it’s all about concern for people with allergies, ABC News reports. “Our ultimate goal is to create an environment where all customers—including those with peanut-related allergies—feel safe and welcome on every Southwest flight,” the airline said in a statement.

Southwest Airlines started offering free peanuts on all its flights in 1971. The practice, which later became synonymous with airplane travel, originally began as a cheeky marketing ploy. In an effort to lower prices, the airline stopped serving in-flight meals and told customers they could fly for peanuts, both literally and figuratively.

But the ubiquity of peanuts on airplanes soon became a concern for individuals with severe food allergies. Proponents of airplane peanut bans say severely allergic individuals can experience reactions from airborne peanut dust alone, but organizations like the American Peanut Council are predictably more skeptical. There’s not enough evidence that someone can experience severe allergic reactions from inhaling peanut dust, they say, so the claim may be a myth.

Fact is, there’s not a whole lot of concrete information on either side. In a 2008 article published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, researchers surveyed 471 people with a medical history of food allergies. Of that number, 41 said they’d experienced allergic reactions to food on commercial airline flights (mostly to peanuts), and 26 said those reactions had come from inhaled peanut dust. An unspecified number said their reactions had been life-threatening. But the study’s authors admitted within the article their methods had limitations—researchers recruited participants through newspaper advertisements, for one, and the data were all self-reported.

The lack of decisive evidence that airplane peanuts cause severe allergic reactions is one reason why airlines have historically been reluctant to make changes. In 2010, the Department of Transportation contemplated banning peanuts on planes, but it abandoned the idea after being reminded of a 2000 law that prohibits the department from enforcing any peanut bans without the support of a conclusive, peer-reviewed study showing severe reactions resulting from "contact with very small airborne peanut particles of the kind that passengers might encounter in an aircraft."

Further complicating the issue is the fact that severe allergies are considered a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA doesn’t regulate air travel discrimination, though, which is why the Air Carrier Access Act, or ACAA, was passed in 1986. The ACAA defines a disability as a “physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.” Severe allergies fall under that (not being able to breathe or eat is a pretty significant impairment), but the ACAA doesn’t specify how airlines should treat customers with food allergies.

Most airlines have specific measures they’ll take in order to accommodate customers with peanut allergies, but such procedures are uneven across airlines, and can sometimes be uneven across flights of the same airline. JetBlue, for example, serves only peanut-free snacks and will make announcements about food allergies. Air Canada recently phased out nuts from all its in-flight food options, and it also offers to create a buffer zone between individuals with allergies and any allergens. Prior to banning peanuts, Southwest allowed people with allergies to pre-board in order to wipe down their seats, but it didn’t make any announcements discouraging passengers from eating peanuts.

Given the airline’s story, peanuts “forever will be part of Southwest's history and DNA,” the company said in a statement. But Southwest isn’t going to stop offering free food to customers who shell out the money for a flight. Passengers in the future can instead look forward to in-flight snacks of pretzels, cookies, veggie chips, and corn chips, CNN reports.

[h/t ABC News]

These 25 Cities Have the Worst Drivers in America

Believe_In_Me/iStock via Getty Images
Believe_In_Me/iStock via Getty Images

If you’re driving in a new city, you might find yourself prone to more fits of road rage than usual, probably because you haven’t yet adapted to the tacit differences in road etiquette. Perhaps you find Pittsburgh drivers to be more mercurial and aggressive than you’re used to, or maybe drivers are so laid-back in Little Rock that you feel like you’ll never reach your destination.

Though everyone is entitled to their own opinions about which cities have the most untrained, absent-minded hooligans on the highway, insurance quote comparison site QuoteWizard broke down a ton of data to determine a ranking of which cities—statistically speaking—actually have the worst drivers. To do it, the team analyzed millions of insurance quotes and added up the numbers of accidents, speeding tickets, DUIs, and citations (which include running red lights, texting while driving, etc.) in 75 cities across the country.

Based on those metrics, they determined that the absolute worst driving city is Portland, Oregon, which boasts the highest number of speeding tickets in the nation. The runner-up is Boise, Idaho, which saw an increasing number of DUIs drive the city up 25 spots from last year’s list (where it ranked 27th).

A staggering seven California cities ranked in the top 25, including Sacramento, San Francisco, San Diego, and Los Angeles. And South Carolina proved to be small but mighty when it comes to driving indiscretions: Greenville, Charleston, and Columbia all made the list.

While this list seems to skew toward the West Coast, many of the top 25 best driving cities are in the Midwest and the South. Detroit, Michigan, takes home the trophy for best driving city, followed by Louisville, Kentucky; Chicago, Illinois; and Miami, Florida.

See below for the full list of worst driving cities, and find out the factors contribute to bad driving here. You can view QuoteWizard's full list of best and worst cities for drivers here.

  1. Portland, Oregon

  1. Boise, Idaho

  1. Virginia Beach, Virginia

  1. Columbus, Ohio

  1. Sacramento, California

  1. Salt Lake City, Utah

  1. Cleveland, Ohio

  1. Denver, Colorado

  1. San Francisco, California

  1. Richmond, Virginia

  1. Madison, Wisconsin

  1. Fresno, California

  1. Bakersfield, California

  1. Seattle, Washington

  1. Omaha, Nebraska

  1. Colorado Springs, Colorado

  1. Dayton, Ohio

  1. Greenville, South Carolina

  1. Charleston, South Carolina

  1. Columbia, South Carolina

  1. Rochester, New York

  1. San Diego, California

  1. Los Angeles, California

  1. Washington, DC

  1. Riverside, California

Soon You'll Be Able to Book a Night Inside the Palace of Versailles

The exterior of the Palace of Versailles
The exterior of the Palace of Versailles
mtnmichelle/iStock via Getty Images

Beginning next spring, interested tourists can say au revoir to more traditional lodging in favor of spending the night inside the Palace of Versailles, as Thrillist reports.

Back in 2015, the palace’s management announced it was looking for an outside partner to convert three of the palace’s buildings into guest accommodations. That outside partner turned out to be Airelles, a luxury hospitality group with three other properties in France.

In 2020, the company will begin accepting bookings for Le Grand Contrôle, a 14-room hotel located in the palace’s south wing. The hotel will also feature a new restaurant from famed French chef Alain Ducasse, the second-most decorated Michelin star chef in the world.

Tourists beware, though: A single night at the company’s other properties generally cost upwards of $500 per night, so a stay at Le Grand Contrôle is unlikely to be cheap. But visitors who want to shell out the money for a room can look forward to an unbeatable location, first-class dining, and the joy of relaxing while telling others to “let them eat cake” (which Marie Antoinette never said, but it's befitting nonetheless).

[h/t Thrillist]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER