The Pasta Sauce Hailed as the World's Best Is Surprisingly Easy to Make at Home

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Just as Julia Child changed the way Americans felt about French cooking, Marcella Hazan changed the way they felt about Italian cooking. And though she's not a household name the way Child is, you've probably seen a copy of Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking in a kitchen or two.

One of her most famous recipes is also the simplest. Her pasta sauce only requires three ingredients and less than an hour, as Delish alerts us.

First, the ingredients. You'll need a 28-ounce can of whole, peeled tomatoes; one peeled, halved onion; and 5 tablespoons of butter. (Yes, 5 whole tablespoons of butter.) You'll also want a pinch or two of salt.

Put everything together in a single pot and set it to simmer over medium heat on the stove for 45 minutes, uncovered. Give it the occasional stir.

And that's it. After the 45 minutes is up, toss out the onion halves, and pour the sauce over your favorite pasta. Easy.

Even now, the sauce's simplicity makes it a little radical. The raw onion and unmelted butter look flat-out weird just sitting there in a pot of tomatoes. But banish the skepticism, please.

Hazan died in 2013. Her husband and translator (she wrote in Italian), Victor Hazan, explained how the sauce came to be in an interview with Epicurious in 2016:

Marcella was a genius when it came to taste. She had an immediate understanding about how flavor affects a dish. She asked herself, 'Why chop an onion? Why saute? I'm going to put the onion, tomato, and butter together and forget about it.'

This recipe is just proof that great cooking doesn't always have to be complicated. If Hazan's style piques your interest, check out some of her other cooking tips gathered by Epicurious here.

[h/t Delish]

Canned Pumpkin Isn’t Actually Pumpkin

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We hate to squash your autumnal dreams, but baking a pumpkin pie might not be as easy as you think. That’s because the canned pumpkin that normally makes pie prep such a breeze isn’t made of pumpkin at all. Food & Wine reports that cans of pumpkin puree—even those that advertise "100 percent pumpkin"—are actually made of a range of different squashes.

Most pumpkin purees are a mix of winter squashes, including butternut squash, Golden Delicious, and Hubbard. Meanwhile, Libby’s, the largest pumpkin puree brand, has developed its own unique brand of squash called the Dickinson, which is more closely related to a butternut squash than a pumpkin. The FDA is vague about what counts as "pumpkin," which allows companies to pack unspecified squashes into their purees and still list pumpkin as the sole ingredient.

While it’s a little unsettling to find out your favorite pie is not what it seems, pumpkin puree brands have a good reason for their deception. While pumpkins are a quintessential part of autumn, they don’t actually taste that great. Most pumpkins are watery and a little bit stringy, and turning them into a puree takes more work, and involves less reward, than other, sweeter winter squashes.

[h/t Food & Wine]

What's the Difference Between Stuffing and Dressing?

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For carbohydrate lovers, nothing completes a Thanksgiving meal quite like stuffing—shovelfuls of bread, celery, mushrooms, and other ingredients that complement all of that turkey protein.

Some people don’t say stuffing, though. They say dressing. In these calamitous times, knowing how to properly refer to the giant glob of insulin-spiking bread seems necessary. So what's the difference?

Let’s dismiss one theory off the bat: Dressing and stuffing do not correlate with how the side dish is prepared. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, and stuffing can be served in a casserole dish. Whether it’s ever seen the inside of a bird is irrelevant, and anyone who tells you otherwise is wrong and should be met with suspicion, if not outright derision.

The terms are actually separated due to regional dialects. Dressing seems to be the favored descriptor for southern states like Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Georgia, while stuffing is preferred by Maine, New York, and other northern areas. (Some parts of Pennsylvania call it filling, which is a bit too on the nose, but to each their own.)

If stuffing stemmed from the common practice of filling a turkey with carbs, why the division? According to The Huffington Post, it may have been because Southerners considered the word stuffing impolite, and therefore never embraced it.

While you should experience no material difference in asking for stuffing or dressing, when visiting relatives it might be helpful to keep to their regionally-preferred word to avoid confusion. Enjoy stuffing yourselves.

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