Toast Prince Harry and Meghan Markle at D.C.’s Royal Wedding Pop-Up Bar

Karlin Villondo Photography
Karlin Villondo Photography

You don’t need to be a UK citizen to get excited for the upcoming royal wedding. For stateside fans obsessing over Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s impending May 19 ceremony, the best place to celebrate will be in Washington, D.C., where the Royal Wedding Pop-Up Bar will be serving up drinks in a space designed to look like the pair’s wedding venue, according to Harper’s Bazaar.

From May 4 to May 20, D.C.'s Pop-Up Bar (PUB) will be decked out to look like Windsor Castle's St. George’s Chapel, complete with family crests and heraldic flags, a careful replica of the historic vaulted ceiling, faux stained-glass windows, and a throne room. On May 19, the bar will open at 7 a.m. to host U.S.-based superfans up early to watch live coverage of the event.

The menu will include beers, ciders, and snacks from the UK, as well as British favorites like Pimm’s Cups. There will also be 11 original themed cocktails, like a drink crafted from rosé cider and edible glitter called the Markle Sparkle, and the God Save the Queen, a martini that comes with a souvenir crown. Another cocktail honoring the groom (and his hair color) includes Scotch, bananas, and ginger.

A commemorative mug with a photo of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle sits next to an engagement ring and roses.
Karlin Villondo Photography

The Royal Wedding bar is one of several limited-run concept bars the Drink Company has created in its 7th Street space in D.C. Each PUB features obsessively detailed decor and innovative drinks around different themes throughout the year. Most recently, the space has been host to a Japan-themed bar called Cherry Blossom Pop-Up Bar (last year’s paid tribute to, among other things, Super Mario Bros.). Previous incarnations also include a Christmas-themed PUB called Miracle on Seventh Street and a Game of Thrones-themed bar.

This time, designers Matt Fox​ and Adriana Salame-Aspiazu “went down the rabbit hole researching British history and royal traditions, so this may be our most detail-oriented PUB to date,” Fox said in a press statement. “We’d like to think the Queen would approve!”

Some of the previous PUB events have drawn hours-long waits, so if you’re keen on celebrating Meghan and Harry (Heghan, if you will), know that you may have to get in line.

[h/t Harper’s Bazaar]

Want to Work at Buckingham Palace? The Queen Is Hiring a Chef

WPA Pool/Getty Images
WPA Pool/Getty Images

Being born (or marrying) into royalty isn't the only way to gain access to the inner sanctum of Buckingham Palace. For people who come from humbler backgrounds, working for the queen is an alternative route. Elizabeth II of England needs dishwashers, housekeepers, and even letter writers to keep her life running smoothly, and as Travel + Leisure reports, there's currently an opening for a chef's job at the queen's London home.

According to the listing shared by the Royal Household, Buckingham Palace's new chef will work full time preparing menus for various events. The position comes with a £22,076.04, or roughly $27,600 annual salary, with the option to live on-site with a salary adjustment. Other benefits include a 15 percent employer pension contribution, 33 vacation days, and free meals during work hours.

To have what it takes to work in the kitchen of the royal family, the new chef should be highly skilled, experienced, and passionate about food and cooking. The job description reads: "As you'd expect, standards are exceptionally high here, and every day is busy, so you’ll need to be an ambitious and qualified chef. You may have some previous experience within a premier kitchen or volume catering environment, but it’s your ability and enthusiasm to deliver across all sections of the kitchen that we're looking for."

The job is primarily based at Buckingham Palace in London, but the chef will occasionally be asked to work at other royal homes, like Balmoral in Scotland. Prospective candidates can apply for the position through the Royal Household's website. If you're interested in applying, here are some insight into the job (including the queen's eating habits) from past royal chefs.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

12 Strange-But-Real Ice Cream Flavors

ipekata/iStock via Getty Images
ipekata/iStock via Getty Images

I scream, you scream, we all scream for … horse flesh ice cream? Okay, so maybe “we all" don’t. But some people do. A lot of people, in fact. Lobster, foie gras, and ghost pepper, too. Next time you’re craving an ice-cold cone, why not step out of your vanilla/chocolate comfort zone to try one of these 12 strange-but-real ice cream flavors.

1. Horse Flesh

There are two dozen attractions within Tokyo’s indoor amusement park, Namja Town, but it would be easy to spend all of your time there pondering the many out-there flavors at Ice Cream City, where Raw Horse Flesh, Cow Tongue, Salt, Yakisoba, Octopus, and Squid are among the flavors that have tickled (or strangled) visitors' taste buds.

2. Pickled Mango

As one of the country’s most decorated ice cream makers, Jeni Britton Bauer—proprietor of Ohio-based Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams—is constantly pushing the boundaries of unique treats, as evidenced by her lineup of limited edition flavors, including last summer's Pickled Mango (a cream cheese-based ice cream with a slightly spicy mango sauce made of white balsamic vinegar, white pepper, allspice, and clove) and this year's Goat Cheese With Red Cherries.

3. Corn on the Cob

Since opening Max & Mina’s in Queens, New York in 1998, brothers/owners Bruce and Mark Becker have created more than 5000 one-of-a-kind ice cream flavors, many of them adapted from their grandfather’s original recipes. Daily flavor experiments mean that the menu is ever-changing, but Corn on the Cob (a summer favorite), Horseradish, Garlic, Pizza, Lox, and Jalapeño have all made the lineup.

4. Foie Gras

New York City's OddFellows takes the "odd" in its name seriously, and has become synonymous with experimental flavors. Since opening their doors in 2013, they've concocted more than 300 different kinds of the cold stuff—including a Foie Gras varietal.

5. Pear and Blue Cheese

“Salty-sweet” is the preferred palette at Portland, Oregon-based Salt & Straw, where sugar and spice blend together nicely with flavors like Strawberry Honey Balsamic Strawberry With Cracked Pepper and Pear With Blue Cheese, a well-balanced mix of sweet Oregon Trail Bartlett Pears mixed with crumbles of Rogue Creamery's award-winning Crater Lake Blue Cheese. Yum?

6. Ghost Pepper

“Traditional” isn’t the word you’d choose to describe any of the 100 ice cream varieties at The Ice Cream Store in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. They don’t have vanilla, they have African Vanilla or Madagascar Vanilla Bean. But things only get wilder from there, and the shop’s proprietors clearly have a penchant for the spicy stuff. In addition to their Devil's Breath Carolina Reaper Pepper Ice Cream—a bright red vanilla ice cream mixed with cinnamon and a Carolina Reaper pepper mash—there's also the classic Ghost Pepper Ice Cream, which was featured in a Ripley's Believe It or Not book in 2016. Just be warned: you'll have to sign a waiver if you plan to order either flavor.

7. Bourbon and Corn Flake

You never know exactly which flavors will appear as part of the daily-changing lineup at San Francisco’s Humphry Slocombe, but they always make room for the signature Secret Breakfast. Made with bourbon and Corn Flakes, you’d better get there early if you want to try it; it sells out quickly and on a daily basis.

8. Fig and Fresh Brown Turkey

The sweet-toothed scientists at New York City’s Il Laboratorio del Gelato have never met a flavor they didn’t like—or want to turn into an ice cream. How else would one explain the popularity of their Fig & Fresh Brown Turkey gelato, a popular selection among the hundreds flavors they have created thus far. (Beet and Cucumber are just two of their other fascinating flavors.)

9. Lobster

Don’t let the “chocolate” in the title fool you: Ben & Bill’s Chocolate Emporium in Bar Harbor, Maine makes the most of The Pine Tree State’s most famous delicacy with its signature Lobster Ice Cream, a butter ice cream-based treat with fresh (again buttered) lobster folded into each bite.

10. Creole Tomato

The philosophy at New Orleans’ Creole Creamery is simple: “Eat ice cream. Be happy.” What’s not as easy is choosing from among their dozens of rotating ice creams, sorbets, sherbets and ices. But only the most daring of diners might want to swap out a sweet indulgence for something that sounds more like a salad, as it the case with the Creole Tomato.

11. Eskimo Ice Cream

If you happen to find yourself in an ice cream shop in Juneau, remember this: Eskimo ice cream—also known as Akutag—is not the same thing as an Eskimo Pie, that chocolate-covered ice cream bar you’ll find in just about any grocery store. Though the statewide delicacy has usually got enough fresh berries mixed in to satisfy one’s sweet tooth, its base is actually animal fat (reindeer, caribou, possibly even whale).

12. Cheetos

Big Gay Ice Cream started out as an experimental ice cream truck and morphed into one of New York City’s most swoon-worthy ice cream shops, where the toppings make for an inimitable indulgence. One of their most unique culinary inventions? A Cheetos-inspired cone, where vanilla and cheese ice cream is dipped in Cheetos dust.

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