Tonight, the Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks on Earth Day

iStock/dmoralesf
iStock/dmoralesf

Tonight, look up and you might see shooting stars streaking across the sky. On the night of Monday, April 22—Earth Day—and the morning of Tuesday, April 23, the Lyrid meteor shower will peak over the Northern Hemisphere. Make some time for the celestial show and you'll probably see meteors zooming across the heavens every few minutes. Here is everything you need to know about this meteor shower.

What is the Lyrid meteor shower?

Every 415.5 years, the comet Thatcher circles the Sun in a highly eccentric orbit shaped almost like a cat's eye. At its farthest from the Sun, it's billions of miles from Pluto; at its nearest, it swings between the Earth and Mars. (The last time it was near the Earth was in 1861, and it won't be that close again until 2280.) That's quite a journey, and more pressingly, quite a variation in temperature. The closer it gets to the Sun, the more debris it sheds. That debris is what you're seeing when you see a meteor shower: dust-sized particles slamming into the Earth's atmosphere at tens of thousands of miles per hour. In a competition between the two, the Earth is going to win, and "shooting stars" are the result of energy released as the particles are vaporized.

The comet was spotted on April 4, 1861 by A.E. Thatcher, an amateur skywatcher in New York City, earning him kudos from the noted astronomer Sir John Herschel. Clues to the comet's discovery are in its astronomical designation, C/1861 G1. The "C" means it's a long-period comet with an orbit of more than 200 years; "G" stands for the first half of April, and the "1" indicates it was the first comet discovered in that timeframe.

Sightings of the Lyrid meteor shower—named after Lyra, the constellation it appears to originate from—are much older; the first record dates to 7th-century BCE China.

How to See the Lyrid Meteor Shower

Monday night marks a waning gibbous Moon (just after the full Moon), which will reflect a significant amount of light. You're going to need to get away from local light pollution and find truly dark skies, and to completely avoid smartphones, flashlights, car headlights, or dome lights. The goal is to let your eyes adjust totally to the darkness: Find your viewing area, lay out your blanket, lay down, look up, and wait. In an hour, you'll be able to see the night sky with great—and if you've never done this before, surprising—clarity. Don't touch the smartphone or you'll undo all your hard ocular work.

Where is the nearest dark sky to where you live? You can find out on the Dark Site Finder map. And because the shower peaks on a Monday night—when you can expect to see 20 meteors per hour—your local astronomy club is very likely going to have an event to celebrate the Lyrid meteor shower. Looking for a local club? Sky & Telescope has you covered.

Other Visible Bodies During the Lyrid meteor shower

You don't need a telescope to see a meteor shower, but if you bring one, aim it south to find Jupiter. It's the bright, unblinking spot in the sky. With a telescope, you should be able to make out its stripes. Those five stars surrounding it are the constellation Libra. You'll notice also four tiny points of light nearby. Those are the Galilean moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. When Galileo discovered those moons in 1610, he was able to prove the Copernican model of heliocentricity: that the Earth goes around the Sun.

What to Do if There's Bad Weather During the Lyrid Meteor Shower

First: Don't panic. The shower peaks on the early morning of April 23. But it doesn't end that day. You can try again on April 24 and 25, though the numbers of meteors will likely diminish. The Lyrid meteor shower will be back next year, and the year after, and so on. But if you are eager for another show, on May 5, the Eta Aquarids will be at their strongest. The night sky always delivers.

LEGO Built a Life-Sized Astronaut Model to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

The LEGO Group
The LEGO Group

The LEGO Group is honoring the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission in a way that only LEGO can: with a life-sized astronaut model constructed entirely from LEGO blocks.

The 6-foot-3-inch model matches the space suit worn on the Moon by astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin on July 21, 1969, down to the American flag patch on his left shoulder. The front of the helmet even mimics the well-known photo of Aldrin standing on the Moon’s surface, with his helmet reflecting his own shadow and fellow Moon-walker Neil Armstrong in the near distance.

The feat took a team of 10 designers and LEGO Master Builders 300 hours and 30,000 LEGO bricks to complete, and you can see it in person on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall as part of the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum’s Apollo 50 Festival from July 18 to July 20.

Though the astronaut model is already complete, there’s still tons to build—during the festival, you can help Master Builders assemble mosaic backdrops of the Moon and Mars, and you can even lend a hand in the construction of a 20-foot-tall replica of NASA's Space Launch System rocket, the vehicle NASA is developing to potentially use to send humans to Mars in the future.

The LEGO Group is also displaying an 11-foot-tall replica of a rocket at the Ontario Science Centre in Canada from now through September 2. It contains not only an impressive 80,000 bricks, but also built-in lights, sound, and a fog machine to simulate a rocket launch.

Buzz Aldrin on the Moon
Buzz Aldrin walks on the Moon.
NASA, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

It’s all part of a LEGO initiative to inspire a new generation of children to be enthusiastic about—and personally involved in—the future of space exploration. In addition to its brick-based efforts, the company is currently partnering with Scholastic on a program to send 50 kids to NASA Space Camp next year. “We will continue to inspire children to dream about what’s possible and to grow up to pursue STEM careers, said Bettina Inclán, associate administrator for communications at NASA’s Washington, D.C. headquarters.

Check out LEGO’s space-related collections—featuring Mars exploration, women of NASA, a recreation of the Moon landing, and more—on its online store.

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

A Half-Blood Thunder Moon Will Light Up Tonight’s Sky

Matt Cardy, Stringer/Getty Images
Matt Cardy, Stringer/Getty Images

Today, July 16, 2019, marks 50 years since NASA launched the Apollo 11 lunar mission. In case you needed another reason to look up at the sky on this date, tonight's Moon will be a special one. It's the only full moon of July, and in some parts of the world, it will appear partially eclipsed, making for a rare half-blood thunder moon, according to Space.com.

The meaning of the name thunder moon has nothing to do with lightening and storm clouds. The full moon of each month of the calendar year is given a special nickname from folklore. January's is a wolf moon, March's is a worm moon, and June's is a strawberry moon. The full moon that appears in July is commonly called a thunder moon, because thunderstorms are frequent this time of year, but it can also be referred to as buck moon because July is when deer antlers are at their fullest.

There's another factor that makes tonight's Moon worth watching. Starting at 2:43 p.m. EDT, the Moon will enter a partial lunar eclipse. That means part of the full moon will pass through the shadow of the Earth, making one section of it appear darker than the rest. A full lunar eclipse is known as a blood moon due to the reddish hue it takes on in our planet's shadow. Tonight's event isn't a full eclipse, so it's being called a half-blood moon even though it may not take on a coppery tone. The partial lunar eclipse will reach its peak at 5:30 p.m. EDT, and conclude at 8:17 p.m. Unfortunately that means the eclipse won't be visible from the U.S., but spectators in Europe, Africa, South America, and parts of Asia will get to see the full show.

July is shaping up to be an exciting month for stargazers. On July 9, Saturn reached opposition, making it look especially large and bright in the night sky. The planet is no longer at peak visibility, but it will be easy to spot with the naked eye from now through September. If you're already planning at looking up at the Moon tonight, here's how to find Saturn at the same time.

[h/t Space.com]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER