A New NASA Map Shows Spring Is Coming Earlier Each Year

iStock
iStock

Climate change is shifting Earth’s seasons. Winters are getting shorter, and the warmth of spring has started to arrive earlier and earlier, messing with the timing of processes like animal migrations and the budding of new plant growth. In a series of graphics spotted by Flowing Data, the NASA Earth Observatory shows how much earlier new leaves are arriving in some parts of the U.S., and how much earlier they reach full bloom.

The data comes from a 2016 study of U.S. national parks, so the maps only cover seasonal changes within the park system. But since there are so many parks spread across the U.S., it’s a pretty good snapshot of how climate change is affecting the timing of spring across the country. The map in green shows the difference in “first leaf” arrival, or when the first leaves emerge from tree buds, and the map in purple shows the arrival of the first blooms.

A map of the U.S. with a colored grid showing where leaves are coming earlier
Joshua Stevens, NASA Earth Observatory

Around 75 percent of the 276 parks analyzed in the study have been experiencing earlier springs, and half had recently seen the earliest springs recorded in 112 years. In Olympic National Park in Washington, the first leaves are now appearing 23 days earlier than they did a century ago, while the Grand Canyon is seeing leaves appear about 11 days earlier. National parks in the Sierras and in Utah are seeing leaves appear five to 10 days earlier, as are areas along the Appalachian Trail. Some parks, however, particularly in the South, are actually seeing a later arrival of spring leaves, shown in dark gray in the graphic.

A map of the U.S. with a colored grid showing where blooms are coming earlier
Joshua Stevens, NASA Earth Observatory

The places that are witnessing earlier first blooms aren't always the ones with extra-early first leaves. The Appalachian Trail is blooming earlier, even though the first leaves aren't arriving any earlier. But in other places, like Olympic National Park, both the first leaves and the first blooms are arriving far earlier than they used to.

“Changes in leaf and flowering dates have broad ramifications for nature,” National Park Service ecologist John Gross explained in the Earth Observatory’s blog. “Pollinators, migratory birds, hibernating species, elk, and caribou all rely on food sources that need to be available at the right time.” When temperatures get out of sync with usual seasonal changes, those species suffer.

[h/t Flowing Data]

Get The Details On All 21 Successful Moon Landings With This Interactive Map

Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan mans a Lunar Roving Vehicle during the Apollo 17 mission.
Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan mans a Lunar Roving Vehicle during the Apollo 17 mission.
NASA, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

In light of Apollo 11’s 50th anniversary this week, the world has focused on those historic first few steps on the Moon and everything that led up to them. But how much do you know about the 20 subsequent Moon landings? To fill you in, Smithsonian.com created an interactive map of the Moon with the who, what, where, when, and how of each successful lunar mission.

The map is color-coded: red for Russian Luna missions, green for China’s Chang'e 3 and Chang'e 4, and blue for the U.S.’s Apollo (marked with stars) and Surveyor missions (simple rings). You can click on each icon to expand a paragraph with a short summary of the mission and its notable accomplishments.

After Russia’s unmanned Luna 9 became the first craft to touch down on the Moon in 1966, 18 other triumphant landings followed in just a decade. The 20th didn’t happen until 37 years later, when China achieved its first landing with Chang'e 3 in 2013. The most recent occurred this past January, when China’s Chang'e 4 became the first spacecraft to land on the far side of the Moon. Chang'e 4 and its rover, Yutu 2, are still exploring the Moon as you read this, and China hopes to launch its follow-up mission, Chang'e 5, as early as this year.

Six Apollo missions landed humans on the Moon, and there haven’t been any actual astronauts on its surface since. But the 15 robotic landings have contributed to our lunar knowledge in a safer, more cost-efficient way. If you look at the map, you can see that most of the spacecrafts have landed near the Moon’s equator on the near side, where the terrain is mostly basaltic plains—the far side contains craters and even mountains. With more Chang'e missions to come from China, and NASA’s Artemis missions in the works, Smithsonian.com may soon have to create a 360° version of its map.

[h/t Smithsonian.com]

Here's Each State’s Favorite Comic Book Universe

drante, iStock / Getty Images Plus
drante, iStock / Getty Images Plus

The hype surrounding the Marvel Cinematic Universe had barely subsided into a low roar after the 2018 releases of Black Panther and Avengers: Infinity War when 2019 brought us two more back-to-back MCU blockbusters: Captain Marvel and Avengers: Endgame. Between the films themselves and the ceaseless stream of fan theories, celebrity content, and toys, it seems like it’s Marvel’s world and we love nothing more than living in it.

But in a recent nationwide analysis by DISH sales agent USDish.com, it appears that a majority of America actually prefers the DC universe over Marvel's. The study used Google Trends data to find out which comic book universe—and which superhero—each state searched for most often. DC is most popular in a surprising 32 states, while Marvel is tops in a mere 14 state. Four states (Alaska, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Kentucky) were tied between the two. DC was also the winner when it came to most popular individual superheroes, though with a smaller margin: 29 states went with a DC hero, while 22 chose someone Marvelous. Superman, a DC creation, held the number one spot in eight states, the most of any superhero.

Illustrated map showing most popular comic book universe in each state
USDish.com

The outcome differs pretty significantly from last year’s study, in which Marvel reigned supreme in 37 states, and DC in only 8 (the remaining five were tied).

It seems, however, that states don’t have a loyalist mentality when it comes to comic book universes: Plenty of states’ most searched-for-superhero was not from its most searched-for universe. Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi, for example, all chose DC and the Hulk, while Texas and Iowa chose Marvel and Superman.

In a couple of instances, the actor who plays the superhero possibly influenced the results. Captain Marvel, brought to life by California-born Brie Larson, was California’s most popular superhero, while Jason Momoa’s Aquaman came out on top in his home state of Hawaii.

Though the list of top superheroes by state is heavily occupied by uber-popular names like Thor, Batman, and Black Panther, it’s not without a few head-scratchers. Kansas and Michigan both apparently love Green Lantern, while Delaware’s top superhero was Batman’s sidekick Robin.

See the full list here to find out what your state thinks.

[h/t USDish.com]

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