15 Old Things In Your House That Are Worth a Fortune

iStock
iStock

Chances are, there's more money in our homes than we realize. There is a market for collectibles of any kind—even those dusty old toys and sickeningly retro Pyrex casserole dishes your grandmother used to warm up meatloaf in can bring in hundreds of dollars. But it's not so easy to distinguish trash from treasure. So to help you along, here are 15 old things in your house that could be worth a fortune.

1. DAVID BOWIE'S DIAMOND DOGS VINYL

Picture of David Bowie
NILS MEILVANG, AFP/Getty Images

For David Bowie's 1974 Diamond Dogs album on vinyl, its worth lies in the very strange story of the album artwork. The original image featured an illustration of Bowie with his bottom half replaced by a dog's—genitals and all. This made record label RCA nervous, so the image was altered before the record hit shelves. As you'd expect, some copies of the original got loose in the world, and in 2003, one sold for $3550. Who knows how many copies of the taboo album art made it off the printer before it was censored?

2. RETRO VIDEO GAMES

Person holding Super Nintendo controller
iStock

There are plenty of ultra-rare and valuable Super Nintendo games that you simply won't see collecting dust in someone's basement—including the limited-run competition edition games and Japanese imports. But other titles like Super Mario RPG, Mega Man X3, Harvest Moon, and Chrono Trigger were big hits that are probably still in the closets of many casual consumers. X3 and Chrono Trigger, in particular, have been known to fetch $400 and close to $600 respectively.

There is a huge rare gaming market that isn't just limited to the SNES—every console has its fair share of pricey titles, from the Genesis to the PlayStation 4. One of the most infamous is Little Samson on the original Nintendo, which regularly ends up on places like eBay and can get bids over $1000. Though, with how rare the game is, it isn't as likely it's just lying around your basement.

3. ANYTHING POLLY POCKET

Polly Pocket toys
Herry Lawford, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The Polly Pocket craze of the '90s gave birth to a line of inch-high toys that kids gobbled up. Now, as is the way of most things, they've found their way to eBay, where the line has been given a second life as a high-priced collector's item. Just one search will yield plenty of pricey results, such as a Peter Pan Polly Pocket set closing in on $300 and this collection of loose Polly Pocket houses for $250. These big-ticket items are from the pre-Mattel Polly Pocket days, so if you have a collection of the original Polly Pocket stuff, get organizing!

4. VINTAGE COMICS THAT INSPIRED TODAY'S MOVIES AND TV SHOWS

A stack of comic books
iStock

Turn on the TV and what do you see? Superheroes on pretty much every channel (and in every theater). And if you own the early comic book adventures of these characters, you can be looking at a hefty profit. Right now, copies of the Black Panther series from the '70s—written and illustrated by co-creator Jack Kirby—are having a moment on eBay. The auction for the series' 15-issue run is already well over $150, and single issues are going for $50 alone.

The first comic book appearance of the villainous Killmonger, who also appears in the Black Panther movie, also shot up in worth and is now hovering around $100. That's nothing compared to Black Panther's own debut, which ranges from a few hundred to $1000 depending on the condition.

Prices go up when these characters are in the spotlight, so go through that old comic collection and do some research. If you have books starring a character that's about to become a movie star, get your eBay account ready. If they're vintage and in good condition, they could fetch a high price.

5. VINTAGE ADVERTISING SIGNS

Vintage Coca-Cola ad
iStock

Before pop-up ads told us what to buy, a major way companies would advertise would be through tin signs hung up in bars, restaurants, and gas stations. And today, some of these signs can bring in a nice chunk of change, like this $225 eBay listing for Indian Motorcycles or this AAA Root Beer bottle sign that's sitting at over $300. Then there's the venerable Coke sign that is listed at over $600.

Beer signs are another surprising money-maker—vintage brands like Falstaff and Griesedieck often get bids in the $500 range, and older signs for common brands like Pabst and Old Milwaukee can go for four-figure amounts. Maybe a member of your family used to own or work at a bar and ended up with one of these signs that's just collected dust in a garage somewhere. Keep a look out—that aluminum soda sign could become your next car insurance payment.

6. BOY SCOUT MEMORABILIA

Boy Scout patches
iStock

All those Boy Scout merit badges and medals you had growing up could net an unlikely sum of money today. Boy Scout memorabilia has been known to get plenty of interest online, with one auction of old paraphernalia going for $240. And one look on eBay shows plenty of listings, with many batches of patches and badges getting bids of over $100.

7. POKÉMON CARDS

Pokemon cards
iStock

Remember all those Pokémon cards that you probably folded up, stuck in your pocket, or traded away to friends when you were younger? Well complete sets of the standard cards can go for hundreds of dollars on eBay. And single, ultra-rare cards can be well into the thousands—like the holograph Charizard that sold for $11,999. Of course they have to be graded and examined by experts to catch that price, but even a stack of the run-of-the-mill cards in mint condition can fetch a few bucks.

8. KANSAS QUARTERS

Kansas quarters
iStock

When the "T" on a coin pressing machine got a smudge on it, a batch of Kansas state quarters had its motto accidentally altered from “In God We Trust” to the far more thought-provoking "In God We Rust." The error didn't last long, but the irregular coins made it out into the world and are now valued at around $100 each. So check those jars of coins you have sitting around; you might have a very valuable printing error on your hands.

9. CHINA SETS

Fine China
iStock

Chances are someone in your family has a china set stacked in a cabinet, waiting for that fancy dinner party that never comes. If you're looking to offload it and make a little money, do your research. China can have a lot of value on sites like eBay and EBTH, and you want to make sure you maximize its worth. If you think it's a nice enough set, bring it to an antique dealer and see—at the very least, you can get a ballpark estimate of its value. Some go for hundreds, if not thousands, online.

10. THE ORIGINAL KENNER STAR WARS FIGURES

The Millennium Falcon toy
iStock

When the original Star Wars movie hit theaters, there was one massive oversight: There were no toys ready for the premiere. No one thought the movie would become the sensation that it has, so Kenner had to rush to get a proper toy line out the year after the movie's release. But when those toys finally hit, it was seismic.

Star Wars toys flew off shelves, and they've become incredible collectors' items today, especially the ones from the '70s and '80s. A 1978 Luke Skywalker toy—the one with the double-telescoping lightsaber—sold at auction for $25,000. And that's not even close to all. There are vintage Boba Fetts going for around $2500 and obscure, pre-Hayden Christensen Anakin Skywalkers going for up to $3000.

Then, of course, there are the vehicles and spaceships, like the original Millennium Falcon, which can net $3000 if it's still in the box. Countless kids had these toys somewhere in the '70s and '80s, and there's a chance you've got a few in your family.

11. VINTAGE LUNCHBOXES

Snoopy lunch box
Caren Pilgrim, Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Lunchboxes have made their way to becoming one of the most cherished collectors' items around. Cartoon characters, superheroes, and rock groups have all been slapped on the side of a tin box for kids to put their PB&J sandwiches in. And now they can be worth well over $100.

This Bonanza lunchbox sold for $130, while The Beatles, even in poor condition, could command around $400. That's just the start. The Munsters, Superman, Lost in Space—they're all going for well over $100, and in some cases will end up over $200. Then there are the surprises like The Wild, Wild West getting bids for $225, while Disney's Davy Crockett is nearing $230. If you have one that you feel can be valuable, do a little research and see what similar ones are going for online.

12. PYREX

A stack of Pyrex bowls
Jessica Fiess-Hill, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Don't waste your time wondering why, just know this: People love vintage Pyrex. Need proof? There’s a butter dish going for $225 on eBay. There are other listings, too. Bowl sets are going for more than $300 and a chip and dip set is closing in on $100. Turns out there could be a little green in grandma's old casserole dish.

13. AMERICAN GIRL DOLLS

Girl holding American Girl doll
iStock

Those original American Girl dolls from 1986 are a popular collector's item now, with Samantha selling as high as $4200 on eBay. Of course that included her outfits and accessories, but other dolls have been known to go for more than $2800. Even dolls out of their original packaging can get a listing for hundreds of dollars, which is a nice little profit from their original price.

14. OLD TYPEWRITERS

Picture of an orange typewriter
iStock

That old, forgotten typewriter in your garage might be worthless to you, but for those who like the soothing clickety-clack of the keys, it could hold real value. On eBay, some typewriters in good condition are going for nearly $200, with this unique orange one getting bids for more than $250. Some of the older antique models can go even higher, with current bids coming in at anywhere from $475 to $560.

The world of typewriters is complex, with so many different manufacturers and models hitting the market in the 20th century. Remember, though, people won't spend big on something like a typewriter simply because it's old. See if it's in good shape and test it out—if it's fashionable and functional, you might get some real interest in it.

15. VINTAGE HE-MAN, G.I. JOE, AND TRANSFORMERS TOYS

Picture of a He-Man toy
Semihundido, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

He-Man, Transformer, and G.I. Joe toys were the "Big Three" for many kids growing up in the '80s, and today, these figures can fetch a fair price even if they've been removed from the box. Just a short trip through eBay will show countless loose toys going for a good amount of money.

This He-Man, complete with accessories, doesn't need a box to get a listing for over $50. Add Skeletor and a couple of comics to the mix and you're suddenly close to $250. And you’re looking at around $100 for a mail-in Cobra Commander action figure.

With action figures, boxes are always better, as listings for more than $200 for Transformers Jetfire and a $300+ Optimus Prime show. And if you have a vehicle in a box, even better. This Dreadnok Thunder Machine from G.I. Joe is currently at $495. But if you want to talk about "Holy Grails," then you have to mention the Masters of the Universe Eternia playset, which is rare enough to exist on eBay in the box for $9999. Even parts of the playset get bids of over $100. You might want to double-check your old toy collection for that one—a few misplaced parts could be another collector's treasure.

Reviews.org Wants to Pay You $1000 to Watch 30 Disney Movies

Razvan/iStock via Getty Images
Razvan/iStock via Getty Images

Fairy tales do come true. CBR reports that Reviews.org is currently hiring five people to watch 30 Disney movies (or 30 TV show episodes) for 30 days on the new Disney+ platform. In addition to $1000 apiece, each of the chosen Disney fanatics will receive a free year-long subscription to Disney+ and some Disney-themed movie-watching swag that includes a blanket, cups, and a popcorn popper.

The films include oldies but goodies, like Fantasia, Bambi, and A Goofy Movie, as well as Star Wars Episodes 1-7 and even the highly-anticipated series The Mandalorian. Needless to say, there are plenty of options for 30 days of feel-good entertainment.

In terms of qualifications: applicants must be over the age of 18, a U.S. resident, have the ability to make a video reviewing the films, as well as a semi-strong social media presence. On the more fantastical side, they are looking for applicants who “really, really lov[e] Disney” and joke that the perfect candidate, “Must be as swift as a coursing river, with all the force of a great typhoon.” You can check out the details in the video below.

Want to put yourself in the running? Be sure to submit your application by Thursday, November 7 at 11:59 p.m. at the link here. And keep an eye out for Disney+, which will be available November 12.

16 Biting Facts About Fright Night

William Ragsdale stars in Fright Night (1985).
William Ragsdale stars in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

Charley Brewster is your typical teen: he’s got a doting mom, a girlfriend whom he loves, a wacky best friend … and an enigmatic vampire living next door.

For more than 30 years, Tom Holland’s critically acclaimed directorial debut has been a staple of Halloween movie marathons everywhere. To celebrate the season, we dug through the coffins of the horror classic in order to discover some things you might not have known about Fright Night.

1. Fright Night was based on "The Boy Who Cried Wolf."

Or, in this case, "The Boy Who Cried Vampire." “I started to kick around the idea about how hilarious it would be if a horror movie fan thought that a vampire was living next door to him,” Holland told TVStoreOnline of the film’s genesis. “I thought that would be an interesting take on the whole Boy Who Cried Wolf thing. It really tickled my funny bone. I thought it was a charming idea, but I really didn't have a story for it.”

2. Peter Vincent made Fright Night click.

It wasn’t until Holland conceived of the character of Peter Vincent, the late-night horror movie host played by Roddy McDowall, that he really found the story. While discussing the idea with a department head at Columbia Pictures, Holland realized what The Boy Who Cried Vampire would do: “Of course, he's gonna go to Vincent Price!” Which is when the screenplay clicked. “The minute I had Peter Vincent, I had the story,” Holland told Dread Central. “Charley Brewster was the engine, but Peter Vincent was the heart.”

3. Peter Vincent is named after two horror icons.

Peter Cushing and Vincent Price.

4. The Peter Vincent role was intended for Vincent Price.

Roddy McDowall in Fright Night (1985)
Roddy McDowall as Peter Vincent in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

“Now the truth is that when I first went out with it, I was thinking of Vincent Price, but Vincent Price was not physically well at the time,” Holland said.

5. Roddy McDowall did not want to play the part like Vincent Price.

Once he was cast, Roddy McDowall made the decision that Peter Vincent was nothing like Vincent Price—specifically: he was a terrible actor. “My part is that of an old ham actor,” McDowall told Monster Land magazine in 1985. “I mean a dreadful actor. He had a moderate success in an isolated film here and there, but all very bad product. Basically, he played one character for eight or 10 films, for which he probably got paid next to nothing. Unlike stars of horror films who are very good actors and played lots of different roles, such as Peter Lorre and Vincent Price or Boris Karloff, this poor sonofabitch just played the same character all the time, which was awful.”

6. It took Holland just three weeks to write the Fright Night script.

And he had a helluva good time doing it, too. “I couldn’t stop writing,” Holland said in 2008, during a Fright Night reunion at Fright Fest. “I wrote it in about three weeks. And I was laughing the entire time, literally on the floor, kicking my feet in the air in hysterics. Because there’s something so intrinsically humorous in the basic concept. So it was always, along with the thrills and chills, something there that tickled your funny bone. It wasn’t broad comedy, but it’s a grin all the way through.”

7. Tom Holland directed Fright Night out of "self-defense."

By the time Fright Night came around, Holland was already a Hollywood veteran—just not as a director. He had spent the past two decades as an actor and writer and he told the crowd at Fright Fest that “this was the first film where I had sufficient credibility in Hollywood to be able to direct ... I had a film after Psycho 2 and before Fright Night called Scream For Help, which … I thought was so badly directed that [directing Fright Night] was self-defense. In self-defense, I wanted to protect the material, and that’s why I started directing with Fright Night."

8. Chris Sarandon had a number of reasons for not wanting to make Fright Night.

Chris Sarandon stars in 'Fright Night' (1985)
Chris Sarandon stars in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

At the Fright Night reunion, Chris Sarandon recalled his initial reaction to being approached about playing vampire Jerry Dandrige. "I was living in New York and I got the script,” he explained. “My agent said that someone was interested in the possibility of my doing the movie, and I said to myself, ‘There’s no way I can do a horror movie. I can’t do a vampire movie. I can’t do a movie with a first-time director.’ Not a first-time screenwriter, but first-time director. And I sat down and read the script, and I remember very vividly sitting at my desk, looked over at my then wife and said, ‘This is amazing. I don’t know. I have to meet this guy.’ And so, I came out to L.A. And I met with Tom [Holland] and our producer. And we just hit it off, and that was it.”

9. Jerry Dandridge is part fruit bat.

After doing some research into the history of vampires and the legends surrounding them, Sarandon decided that Jerry had some fruit bat in him, which is why he’s often seen snacking on fruit in the film. When asked about the 2011 remake with Colin Farrell, Sarandon commented on how much he appreciated that that specific tradition continued. “In this one, it's an apple, but in the original, Jerry ate all kinds of fruit because it was just sort of something I discovered by searching it—that most bats are not blood-sucking, but they're fruit bats,” Sarandon told io9. “And I thought well maybe somewhere in Jerry's genealogy, there's fruit bat in him, so that's why I did it.”

10. William Ragsdale learned he had booked the part of Charley Brewster on Halloween.

William Ragsdale had only ever appeared in one film before Fright Night (in a bit part). He had recently been considered for the role of Rocky Dennis in Mask, which “didn’t work out,” Ragsdale recalled. “But a few months later, [casting director] Jackie Burch tells me, ‘There’s this movie I’m casting. You might be really right for it.’ So, I had this 1976 Toyota Celica and I drove that through the San Joaquin valley desert for four or five trips down for auditioning. And in the last one, Stephen [Geoffreys] was there, Amanda [Bearse] was there and that’s when it happened. I had read the script and at the time I had been doing Shakespeare and Greek drama, so I read this thing and thought, ‘Well, God, this looks like a lot of fun. There’s no … iambic pentameter, there’s no rhymes. You know? Where’s the catharsis? Where’s the tragedy?’ … I ended up getting a call on Halloween that they had decided to use me, and I was delighted.”

11. Not being Anthony Michael Hall worked in Stephen Geoffreys's favor.

In a weird way, it was by not being Anthony Michael Hall that Stephen Geoffreys was cast as Evil Ed. “I actually met Jackie Burch, the casting director, by mistake in New York months before this movie was cast and she remembered me,” Geoffreys shared at Fright Fest. “My agent sent me for an audition for Weird Science. And Anthony Michael Hall was with the same agent that I was with, and she sent me by mistake. And Jackie looked at me when I walked into the office and said, ‘You’re not Anthony Michael Hall!’ and I’m like ‘No!’ But anyway, I sat down and I talked to Jackie for a half hour and she remembered me from that interview and called my agent, and my agent sent me the script while I was with Amanda [Bearse] in Palm Springs doing Fraternity Vacation, and I read it. It was awesome. The writing was incredible.”

12. Evil Ed wanted to be Charley Brewster.

Stephen Geoffreys stars in 'Fright Night' (1985).
Stephen Geoffreys stars in Fright Night (1985).
Columbia Pictures

Geoffreys loved the script for Fright Night. “I just got this really awesome feeling about it,” he said. “I read it and thought I’ve got to do this. I called my agent and said ‘I would love to audition for the part of Charley Brewster!’ [And he said] ‘No, Steve, you’re wanted for the part of Evil Ed.’ And I went, ‘Are you kidding me? Why? I couldn’t… What do they see in me that they think I should be this?' Well anyway, it worked out. It was awesome and I had a great time.”

13. Fright Night's original ending was much different.

The film’s original ending saw Peter Vincent transform into a vampire—while hosting “Fright Night” in front of a live television audience.

14. A ghost from Ghostbusters made a cameo in Fright Night.

Visual effects producer Richard Edlund had recently finished up work on Ghostbusters when he and his team began work on Fright Night. And the movie gave them a great reason to recycle one of the library ghosts they had created for Ghostbusters—which was deemed too scary for Ivan Reitman's PG-rated classic—and use it as a vampire bat for Fright Night.

15. Fright Night's cast and crew took it upon themselves to record some DVD commentaries.

Because the earliest DVD versions of Fright Night contained no commentary tracks, in 2008 the cast and crew partnered with Icons of Fright to record a handful of downloadable “pirate” commentary tracks about the making of the film. The tracks ended up on a limited-edition 30th anniversary Blu-ray of the film, which sold out in hours.

16. Vincent Price loved Fright Night.


Columbia Pictures

Holland had the chance to meet Vincent Price one night at a dinner party at McDowall’s. And the actor was well aware that McDowall’s character was based on him. “I was a little bit embarrassed by it,” Holland admitted. “He said it was wonderful and he thought Roddy did a wonderful job. Thank God he didn’t ask why he wasn’t cast in it.”

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER