When King of Pop Michael Jackson Was Officially Crowned King of a Small African Nation

Michael Jackson sits with orphaned and abandoned Ivory Coast children he invited to the Intercontinental Hotel in Abidjan on February 16, 1992.
Michael Jackson sits with orphaned and abandoned Ivory Coast children he invited to the Intercontinental Hotel in Abidjan on February 16, 1992.
ISSOUF SANOGO, AFP/Getty Images

As Michael Jackson's private plane landed in Abidjan, a populous city in Côte d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), thousands of people were waiting near the tarmac, hoping to meet the superstar. But Jackson's visit that day, February 13, 1992, got off to a rocky start.

Rather than greet the crowd of government officials, journalists, and fans, Jackson held his nose as he stepped off the plane and reportedly sprinted toward a waiting limo. Although his team later claimed that the gesture was a nervous twitch, fans were disappointed that Jackson seemed to snub them. Even worse, police used batons and tear gas to attack a crowd of fans who were waiting for Jackson outside his hotel. Already-heightened tensions between police and student protestors in Abidjan may have contributed to the violence, but some media reports blamed the presence of the musician and his larger-than-life image.

Despite these setbacks, Jackson had always felt a deep connection to Africa. In a May 1992 interview with Ebony magazine, he explained how he fell in love with the continent on a trip to Senegal with the Jackson Five when he was a teenager: "Drums and sounds filled the air with rhythm. I was going crazy … This is it. This is where I come from. The origin."

Among the many stops on this February 1992 trip, Jackson's itinerary included meeting with Tanzania's president to talk about saving African elephants, receiving a medal from the president of Gabon, and visiting orphanages, hospitals, and churches. But for the biggest honor, Jackson traveled to Krindjabo, a village in the southeastern corner of Ivory Coast. There, the King of Pop became Michael Jackson Amalaman Anoh, an actual king.

In Krindjabo, the Agni people have lived in the Kingdom of Sanwi, an African region, since the mid-18th century. Based on mystic readings and possible DNA tests, a tribal chief asserted that Jackson was a descendent of Sanwi royalty and, accordingly, invited him to be crowned king-in-waiting (akin to a prince in the West).

According to NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, Jackson's coronation was full of joy, dancing, and the frenetic sounds of traditional Agni drumming. Jackson put on a colorful, traditional toga-style cloth and sat on a golden stool under a sacred tree. Agni chiefs and elders took turns crowning him and chanting, and villagers drummed and topless women danced to celebrate Jackson's coronation as Chief of the Agni and King of the Sanwi.

 

After he was crowned, Jackson gave his thanks in French and English, then he signed documents to make his coronation official.

But Jackson's ties to the Kingdom of Sanwi didn't end there. As Sanwi beliefs dictate, when Jackson was crowned he became the spiritual son of King Nana Amon Ndoufou IV, a Sanwi leader who participated in Jackson's coronation. In 1995, Jackson invited Ndoufou to his home in Los Angeles, and for four days, Jackson and his then-wife Lisa Marie Presley hosted Ndoufou. On his trip, Ndoufou also met attorney Johnnie Cochran, and Jackson took him to Universal Studios.

Young child in Krindjabo, Ivory Coast, wearing a hat memorializing Michael Jackson following his death.
A young child wears a hat memorializing Michael Jackson, which reads "Sanwi African region will not forget you," on August 1, 2009 in Krindjabo, an Ivory Coast village where Jackson was crowned king in 1992.
KAMBOU SIA, AFP/Getty Images

Jackson's unexpected death in 2009 spurred the Sanwi Kingdom to hold a two-day royal funeral for their king. Dancers, Jackson lookalikes, and more than 1000 villagers gathered to mourn. Tribe members asked Jackson's family for his body, hoping they could give him a royal burial, but Jackson was ultimately interred in Southern California. Sanwi chiefs eventually found a successor for Jackson's crown—minister and politician Jesse Jackson.

Asked how it felt to be a real king—a title perhaps even harder to obtain than his still-relevant King of Pop honorific—Jackson remained humble. "I never try to think hard about it because I don't want it to go to my head," he told Ebony. "But, it's a great honor."

New Game of Thrones Season 8 Teaser Features an Important Callback to the Very First Episode

HBO
HBO

On Sunday, January 13, HBO finally shared the air date for Game of Thrones's eighth and final season, along with a 90-second promo that featured Jon Snow and Sansa and Arya Stark walking through the Crypts of Winterfell with the voices of the late Lyanna, Catelyn, and Ned Stark heard as they passed each of their statues.

In the immediate aftermath of the new teaser, the biggest question on people's minds seemed to be the whereabouts of Bran Stark—and whether his absence from the trailer confirmed one of the long-held fan theories that Bran is in fact the Night King, or that he is the Three-Eyed Raven. But now that fans have had additional time to digest the footage, they've noticed something else: a clever callback to the series' first-ever episode from 2011.

Just after the 1:00 mark, the camera closes in on feather which quickly freezes over with ice. To the casual viewer, this may not seem like an important thing. But those who recall the show's tiniest details recognized the feather as a callback to the pilot episode of Game of Thrones, and a symbol of Jon Snow's true parentage.

As Business Insider reminds us in "Winter is Coming"—the first aired episode of Game of Thrones—Lyanna's statue was shown in very much the same way that we see it in the new teaser, with King Robert Baratheon placing a feather on it. Fast forward to the fifth season, and you may remember Sansa visiting Lyanna's crypt and picking up that same feather. Both of these scenes hinted that Lyanna was Jon's real mother—a fact that was confirmed in season seven, when it was revealed that he is indeed the son of Lyanna Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen, who were secretly married in Dorne. (Though Jon doesn't know it yet.)

Ever since that revelation, we've suspected that Jon—who is believed to be the bastard son of Ned Stark—will finally learn about his parents in the final season, and the teaser seems to confirm that it will be an important storyline. Especially considering the growing romance between Jon and Daenerys Targaryen, who is Rhaegar's sister … making her Jon's aunt (unbeknownst to either of them, of course).

The final season of Game of Thrones will premiere on April 14, 2019.

Why Chris Evans Turned Down the Role of Captain America 'A Few Times'

Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

In 2011, Chris Evans made his first big-screen appearance as superhero Steve Rogers/Captain America in Captain America: The First Avenger. It may now seem impossible for Marvel fans to imagine any other actor in the role, but Evans once admitted that it took a lot of convincing to get him to sign on for the part.

While appearing on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in 2016, Evans revealed that he actually turned down the project "a few times" before finally saying yes. When asked by Kimmel why he was so reluctant to play such a popular superhero, Evans replied that, "I was scared."

In addition to admitting to "having some social anxiety with this industry," Evans explained that his main hesitation was in signing what was ostensibly a nine-picture contract. "In doing movies one at a time, if all of a sudden you decide you don't want to do it anymore, you're afforded the opportunity to take a step back and recalibrate," Evans said. "When you have a giant contract, if all of a sudden you're not responding well? Too bad, you've got to suit up again. That was scary."

Though he initially declined the role, Evans said the offer just kept coming back to him. And after talking to family and friends about it, he realized what an amazing opportunity he was being offered—and what was holding him back.

"I was saying no out of fear, really," Evans said. "You can't do anything out of fear. You can't be doing something because you're scared. It ended up kind of clicking to me in the way that whatever you're scared of, push yourself into it."

Evans's Captain America has gone on to become one of the Marvel Cinematic Universe's most popular characters, though it's largely rumored that Avengers: Endgame will mark his final outing as The Captain. Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, and Keke Palmer are just a few of the actors whose names are swirling as possible replacements for Evans.

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