The 18 Best Films Of The 21st Century, According to Rotten Tomatoes

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Earlier generations may have had Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert to help them decide whether to see or skip a movie, but today's film buffs largely rely on Rotten TomatoesAccording to the Los Angeles Times, 36 percent of U.S. moviegoers check in with the popular review website—which aggregates hundreds of published film reviews to calculate “fresh” or “rotten” scores for movies and TV shows—before seeing a motion picture. So in order to find the 21st century's best films so far, IndieWire dove deep into the Rotten Tomatoes archives, compiling a list of the site’s "freshest" films of each year since 2000.

According to the Rotten Tomatoes data, Jordan Peele's much-lauded and (highly popular) Get Out dominated 2017’s film offerings, with a 99 percent positive score out of 295 critical reviews. It scored slightly higher than the year's other critically acclaimed movies, like The Big Sick, Dunkirk, Wonder Woman, and Lady Bird.

Barry Jenkins’s Academy Award-winning film Moonlight was the top choice of 2016, with a 98 percent score gleaned from 305 reviews. Mad Max: Fury Road, Boyhood, Gravity, and Argo were the “freshest” films of 2015, 2014, 2013, and 2012, respectively, according to the site's rankings. Big franchise films stole a couple of the top spots: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows—Part 2 won 2011, The Dark Knight dominated 2008, and The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers was 2002's big hit.

Perhaps not surprisingly, Pixar ended up dominating the list, with 2001’s Monsters Inc., 2003’s Finding Nemo, 2004’s The Incredibles, 2007’s Ratatouille, 2009’s Up, and 2010’s Toy Story 3 all beating out animated and non-animated films alike in the years they were released. Aardman Animations's stop-motion comedy Chicken Run was the only non-Pixar animation to make the list, winning the top spot for 2000 with a score of 97 percent out of 170 reviews. Murderball, a documentary about wheelchair rugby, was the only nonfiction film to make the cut, scoring an average 98 percent across 138 reviews in 2005, while 2006 belonged to The Queen.

While Rotten Tomatoes isn't always the most accurate way to determine a film's quality, the ratings do provide a rough idea of whether or not professional film critics on the whole liked it.

[h/t IndieWire]

George R.R. Martin Doesn't Think Game of Thrones Was 'Very Good' For His Writing Process

Kevin Winter, Getty Images
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

No one seems to have escaped the fan fury over the finals season of Game of Thrones. While likely no one got it quite as bad as showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, even author George R.R. Martin—who wrote A Song of Ice and Fire, the book series upon which the show is based, faced backlash surrounding the HBO hit. The volatile reaction from fans has apparently taken a toll on both Martin's writing and personal life.

In an interview with The Guardian, the acclaimed author said he's sticking with his original plan for the last two books, explaining that the show will not impact them. “You can’t please everybody, so you’ve got to please yourself,” he stated.

He went on to explain how even his personal life has taken a negative turn because of the show. “I can’t go into a bookstore any more, and that used to be my favorite thing to do in the world,” Martin said. “To go in and wander from stack to stack, take down some books, read a little, leave with a big stack of things I’d never heard of when I came in. Now when I go to a bookstore, I get recognized within 10 minutes and there’s a crowd around me. So you gain a lot but you also lose things.”

While fans of the book series are fully aware of the author's struggle to finish the final two installments, The Winds of Winter and A Dream of Spring, Martin admitted that part of the delay has been a result of the HBO series, and fans' reaction to it.

“I don’t think [the series] was very good for me,” Martin said. “The very thing that should have speeded me up actually slowed me down. Every day I sat down to write and even if I had a good day … I’d feel terrible because I’d be thinking: ‘My God, I have to finish the book. I’ve only written four pages when I should have written 40.'"

Still, Martin has sworn that the books will get finished ... he just won't promise when.

[h/t The Guardian]

Attention Movie Geeks: Cinephile Is the Card Game You Need Right Now

Cinephile/Amazon
Cinephile/Amazon

If you’ve got decades worth of movie trivia up in your head but nowhere to show it off, Cinephile: A Card Game just may be your perfect outlet. Created by writer, art director, and movie expert Cory Everett, with illustrations by Steve Isaacs, this game aims to test the mettle of any film aficionado with five different play types that are designed for different skill and difficulty levels.

For players looking for a more casual experience, Cinephile offers a game variety called Filmography, where you simply have to name more movies that a given actor has appeared in than your opponent. For those who really want to test their knowledge of the silver screen, there’s the most challenging game type, Six Degrees, which plays like Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon, with the player who finds the fewest number of degrees between two actors getting the win.

When you choose actors for Six Degrees, you’ll do so using the beautifully illustrated cards that come with the game, featuring Hollywood A-listers past and present in some of their most memorable roles. You’ve got no-brainers like Uma Thurman in Kill Bill (2003) and Arnold Schwarzenegger in Total Recall (1990) alongside cult favorites like Bill Murray from 2004's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and Jeff Goldblum in The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984). Of course, being a game designed for the true film buff, you’ll also get some deeper cuts like Helen Mirren from 1990’s The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover and Sean Connery in 1974's Zardoz. There are 150 cards in all, with expansion packs on the way.

Cinephile is a labor of love for Everett and Isaacs, who originally got this project off the ground via Kickstarter, where they raised more than $20,000. Now it’s being published on a wider scale by Clarkson Potter, a Penguin Random House group. You can pre-order your copy from Amazon now for $20 before its August 27 release date.

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