10 Wacky Grooming Products from the 1970s

I’d like to say that we Baby Boomers were savvy shoppers in our youth—that we never fell for fancy packaging or seductive advertisements. I’d like to say that, but I’d be lying. Why else would we have slapped down our hard-earned baby-sitting money on products like these in the eternal quest to look and smell our best?

1. Lemon Up


Vermont Country Store

Each bottle of Lemon Up shampoo purportedly contained the juice of one whole lemon along with its other ingredients. Rinsing your hair with lemon juice after shampooing was one of those beauty tips advice columnists used to hand out—it helped to rinse all the detergent-y buildup out of your hair and make it shiny. Of course, mixing the lemon juice right in with the detergent sounds like it defeats the purpose… 

2. Body on Tap

Beer was another home remedy to make your tresses shiny (reflective hair was big in the 1970s), and Body on Tap shampoo contained a whole cup o’suds. 

3. Dry Look

Men were beginning to ditch their Brylcreem and discover the wonders of the blow dryer in the early 1970s. But how to hold those flyaway hairs in place in a manly fashion? The Dry Look, a hairspray designed especially for males, to the rescue!

4. Tickle deodorant

The, er, unusual shape of the Tickle bottle invited all sorts of rude comments about what was really making those women in the TV commercials giggle uncontrollably.

5. Love’s Baby Soft

Was Love’s Baby Soft fragrance line deliberately sexualizing children in their ads…? To add to the “ick” factor of the ad campaign, the stuff actually smelled like baby powder!

6. Short ‘n Sassy

Flickr: Twitchery

Short hair probably didn’t require a different formulation of shampoo in order to maintain its shape and bounce. In fact, anyone who took the time to read the “ingredients” panel would probably discover that Short & Sassy was made up of the same stuff as every other shampoo on the shelf. Really picky consumers could even argue that gold medal skater Dorothy Hamill sported her trademark wedge haircut long before this shampoo hit the shelves.

7. Gee Your Hair Smells Terrific

Jergens Gee Your Hair Smells Terrific from Robert Burton on Vimeo.

This floral-fragranced shampoo is one of the brands most often mentioned on Internet message boards frequented by women who grew up in the 1970s and early '80s. Perhaps Madison Avenue advertising types should take note—products whose names are rejoinders make an impression with consumers.

8. Earth Born Shampoo

Flickr: Twitchery

Between Lemon Up and Earth Born, it seems like women in the '70s wore more fruit in their hair than Carmen Miranda. I did, in fact, use the apricot version of this shampoo back when I was in the eighth grade, and while I didn’t notice any appreciable difference in my hair quality, I can report that when I got caught in the rain my hair reeked of a fruity aroma.

9. Blue Jeans Cologne

Cleopatra's Boudoir

This was one of those fragrances that apparently pinned its success on the package design. I mean, who wants to actually smell like a pair of denim pants?

10. Skinny Dip Cologne

To go “skinny dipping” means to swim in the raw, so this fragrance had a semi-naughty vibe from the get-go. Add to that advertisements featuring Plain Everygirl Sandy Duncan, who gets no attention from men until she daubs Skinny Dip behind her ears (suddenly she’s surrounded by suitors), and you’ve got a best-seller.

Were you a Breck girl? Did you use Psssst on your hair in between shampoos? Share your favorite grooming products of yesteryear with the rest of us!

America's 25 Best Big Cities to Live In

Biking along the boardwalk in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
Biking along the boardwalk in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
Kirkikis/iStock via Getty Images

Although many people enjoy the peace and quiet that a rural, out-of-the-way small town can offer, others thrive in big cities. Approximately 80 percent of the United States's total population live in urban areas that offer a wide range of opportunities when it comes to socializing, careers, and everyday living.

Even though living in a big city sounds pretty nice, it comes with a price (literally), as home prices are generally higher in urban areas. Given the number of people who occupy the same space, there are also other worries about air pollution and traffic. However, sometimes the good outweighs the bad.

Financial advisory site Wallethub compared 62 of the largest cities in the United States and ranked them from best to worst, based on five key indicators: affordability, economy, education and health, quality of life, and safety. In the end, they figured out each city’s weighted average among all the different dimensions in order to compile the ranked list. Where did your city fall?

  1. Virginia Beach, VA
  1. Austin, TX
  1. Seattle, WA
  1. San Diego, CA
  1. Las Vegas, NV
  1. San Francisco, CA
  1. New York, NY
  1. San Jose, CA
  1. Honolulu, HI
  1. Portland, OR
  1. Raleigh, NC
  1. Minneapolis, MN
  1. Denver, CO
  1. Colorado Springs, CO
  1. Tampa, FL
  1. Washington, DC
  1. Pittsburgh, PA
  1. Mesa, AZ
  1. Omaha, NE
  1. Boston, MA
  1. Aurora, CO
  1. Charlotte, NC
  1. Chicago, IL
  1. Atlanta, GA
  1. Arlington, TX
Source: WalletHub

The 25 Highest-Grossing Movies of All Time Worldwide

Robert Downey Jr. in Avengers: Endgame (2019).
Robert Downey Jr. in Avengers: Endgame (2019).
Marvel Studios

Ever since Avengers: Endgame was announced, Hollywood insiders had no doubt it would be a box office smash. But few people could have predicted just how big of a dent the movie would make in its opening weekend alone. The latest MCU movie demolished all previous box office records by making a cool $1.2 billion in just its first few days in theaters.

It's the first film in cinema history to cross the billion-dollar mark in its opening weekend, and knocked its predecessor—Avengers: Infinity War—from the top spot in terms of opening weekends by almost double (Infinity War broke records a year ago when it made $640 million worldwide during its first weekend in theaters). After grossing $2 billion in record time, and knocking James Cameron's Titanic out of the number two spot of biggest blockbusters, Avengers: Endgame has now officially unseated yet another Cameron film, Avatar—which has held the number one spot for 10 years—to become the highest-grossing movie of all time.

  1. Avengers: Endgame (2019) // $2,790,200,000

  2. Avatar (2009) // $2,789,700,000

  3. Titanic (1997) // $2,187,500,000

  4. Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) // $2,068,200,000

  5. Avengers: Infinity War (2018) // $2,048,400,000

  6. Jurassic World (2015) // $1,671,700,000

  7. Marvel's The Avengers (2012) // $1,518,800,000

  8. Furious 7 (2015) // $1,516,000,000

  9. Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) // $1,405,400,000

  10. Black Panther (2018) // $1,346,900,000

  11. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (2011) // $1,341,700,000

  12. Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) // $1,332,500,000

  13. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) // $1,309,500,000

  14. Frozen (2017) // $1,276,500,000

  15. Beauty and the Beast (2017)// $1,263,500,000

  16. Incredibles 2 (2017) // $1,242,800,000

  17. The Fate of the Furious (2017) // $1,236,000,000

  18. Iron Man 3 (2013) // $1,214,800,000

  19. Minions (2015) // $1,159,400,000

  20. Captain America: Civil War (2016) // $1,153,300,000

  1. Aquaman (2018) // $1,148,000,000

  1. Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011) // $1,123,800,000

  2. Captain Marvel (2019) // $1,120,100,000

  1. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003) // $1,119,900,000

  2. Skyfall (2012) // $1,108,600,000

Box office totals courtesy of Box Office Mojo.

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