New Civil Rights Trail Lets You See Where History Was Made

Jacqueline Nix, iStock
Jacqueline Nix, iStock

Travelers looking to learn more about our country's civil rights heritage will soon have a chance to hit the trail.

Due to launch in January 2018, the new Civil Rights Trail will link more than 100 historical sites that tell the story of African-Americans' struggle for equal rights. Some of the places are familiar national landmarks, while others reveal little-known history behind milestone events in the movement, notes Lonely Planet.

Former National Park Service director Jonathan Jarvis initiated the beginnings of the project in 2015 to help the spots gain UNESCO World Heritage site status, according to Condé Nast Traveler. The tourism bureaus of the states where the sites lie are sponsoring the design and promotion of the trail.

The itinerary features landmarks across a quarter of U.S. territory, from Topeka, Kansas, to Wilmington, Delaware, to New Orleans. Many are located in Alabama, including Montgomery, the site of the 1955 bus boycott and other watershed events; Tuskegee, where the prominent university for African-American scholars was founded in the late 19th century; Birmingham, where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was jailed for nonviolent protest; and Selma, where thousands marched for voting rights.

Other highlights include the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.; Little Rock Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas; the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans, which desegregated the courts in the Deep South; and the Woolworth's lunch counter (now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum) in Greensboro, North Carolina, where four black students launched the sit-in movement on February 1, 1960.

The project's debut next year will also coincide with the 50th anniversary of King's assassination in 1968 at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee—now one of the trail's featured sites.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

Hundreds of Kangaroos Roam the Green at This Australian Golf Course

burroblando/iStock via Getty Images
burroblando/iStock via Getty Images

Anglesea Golf Club has all the makings of a regular golf club: an 18-hole golf course, a mini golf course, a driving range, a clubhouse, and a bistro. But the kangaroo mobs that hop around the holes add an element of surprise to your otherwise leisurely round of one of the slowest games in sports.

Person takes photo of a kangaroo
Anglesea Golf Club

According to Thrillist, the kangaroos have been a mainstay for years, and the club started giving tours a few years ago to ensure visitors could observe them in the safest way possible. For about 25 minutes, a volunteer tour guide will drive a golf cart with up to 14 passengers around the course, sharing fun facts about kangaroos and stopping at opportune locations for people to snap a few photos of the marsupials, which are most active in late afternoon and early morning. Kangaroos are friendly creatures, but Anglesea’s website reminds visitors that “they can also be quite aggressive if they feel threatened.”

Post-graduate students and academic staff from Melbourne University’s zoology department have been researching Anglesea’s kangaroo population since 2004, and some of the animals are marked with collar and ear tags so the researchers can track movement, growth, survival, and reproduction patterns throughout their life cycle.

One of the reasons kangaroos have continued to dwell on land so highly trafficked by people is because of the quality of the land itself, National Geographic reports. The golf course staff regularly sprinkles nitrogen fertilizer all over the green, which makes the grass especially healthy.

Kangaroos graze on Anglesea Golf Course
Anglesea Golf Club

If you decide to plan a trip to Anglesea Golf Club, you can book a kangaroo tour here—adult tickets are $8.50, and children under 12 can come along for just $3.50 each.

[h/t Thrillist]

House Boasting a ‘Harry Potter Room’ Under the Stairs Hits the Market in San Diego

Cupboard under the stairs featured on the Warner Bros. Studio Tour: The Making of Harry Potter in London.
Cupboard under the stairs featured on the Warner Bros. Studio Tour: The Making of Harry Potter in London.
Matt Robinson, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

When Harry Potter fans dream of living like the boy wizard, they may picture Harry's cozy quarters in the Gryffindor dormitory at Hogwarts. One home owner in San Diego, California is trying to spin one of Harry's much less idyllic living situations as a magical feature. As The San Diego Union-Tribune reports, a listing of a three-bedroom house for sale in the city's Logan Heights neighborhood boasts a "Harry Potter room"—a.k.a storage room under the stairs.

In the Harry Potter books, the cupboard under the stairs of the Dursley residence served as Harry's bedroom before he enrolled in Hogwarts. Harry was eager to escape the cramped, dusty space, but thanks to the series' massive success, a similar feature in a real-world home may be a selling point for Harry Potter fans.

Kristin Rye, the seller of the San Diego house, told The Union-Tribune she would read Harry Potter books to her son, though she wouldn't describe herself as a super fan. As for why she characterized her closet as a “large ‘Harry Potter’ storage room underneath stairs" in her real estate listing, she said it was the most accurate description she could think of. “It’s just this closet under the stairs that goes back and is pretty much like a Harry Potter room. I don’t know how else to describe it," she told the newspaper.

Beyond the cupboard under the stairs, Rye's listing doesn't bear much resemblance to the cookie-cutter, suburban home of 4 Privet Drive. Nearly a century old, the San Diego house has the same cobwebs and a musty smells you might expect from the Hogwarts dungeons, the newspaper reports. But there are some perks, including a parking spot and backyard space for a garden or pull-up bar. The 1322-square-foot home is listed at $425,000—cheaper than the median price of $620,000 for a resale single-family home in the area.

If you want to live like a wizard, you don't necessarily need to start by moving under a staircase. In North Yorkshire, England, a cottage modeled after Hagrid's Hut is available to rent on a nightly basis.

[h/t The San Diego Union-Tribune]

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