15 of Nelson Mandela's Most Inspiring Quotes

Scott Barbour/Getty Images
Scott Barbour/Getty Images

From the four-hour “I am prepared to die” speech he gave at his 1962 trial to letters written after his retirement, Nelson Mandela’s thoughts and words of wisdom have long inspired people around the world. On what would have been his 99th birthday, here are some of Madiba’s most thought-provoking and inspirational words.

1. ON COURAGE:

"I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear."

The Long Walk to Freedom, 1994

2. ON GROWTH:

"It is in the character of growth that we should learn from both pleasant and unpleasant experiences.”

Address to the Foreign Correspondents Association, 1997

3. ON LEARNING FROM THE PAST:

“Out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long, must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud.”

Presidential inauguration, 1994

4. ON ACHIEVING SUCCESS:

“Everyone can rise above their circumstances and achieve success if they are dedicated to and passionate about what they do.”

—A letter to South African cricket player Makhaya Ntini, 2009

5. ON PARENTING:

“Few things make the life of a parent more rewarding and sweet as successful children.”

Letter from prison, 1981

6. ON HUMANITY:

“Men, I think, are not capable of doing nothing, of saying nothing, of not reacting to injustice, of not protesting against oppression, of not striving for the good society and the good life in the ways they see it.”

Statement to the court, 1962

7. ON UNITY:

“We must embrace one another on the basis of justice and nurture the extended family to which we all belong.”

Speech at anti-Apartheid activist Beyers Naude's 80th birthday celebration, 1995

8. ON PERSISTENCE:

“But I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb.”

The Long Walk to Freedom, 1994

9. ON MEETING CHALLENGES:

"Difficulties break some men but make others. No axe is sharp enough to cut the soul of a sinner who keeps on trying, one armed with the hope that he will rise even in the end."

Letter to Winnie Mandela, 1975

10. ON INTEGRITY:

“Those who conduct themselves with morality, integrity and consistency need not fear the forces of inhumanity and cruelty.”

—British Red Cross Humanity lecture, 2003

11. ON EQUALITY:

“I have never regarded any man as my superior, either in my life outside or inside prison.”

Letter written from prison to the Prison Commissioner, 1976

12. ON OPTIMISM:

“Part of being optimistic is keeping one's head pointed toward the sun, one's feet moving forward.”

Long Walk to Freedom, 1994

13. ON EDUCATION:

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

Speech from the launch of the Mindset Network, 2003

14. ON LIVING LIFE FULLY:

"There is no passion to be found playing small—in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living."

Long Walk to Freedom, 1994

15. ON BELIEFS:

“One cannot be prepared for something while secretly believing it will not happen.”

Long Walk to Freedom, 1994

6 Things You Might Not Know About Sally Ride

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons
U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

You know Sally Ride as the first American woman to travel into space. But here are six things you might not know about the astronaut, who was born on May 26, 1951.

1. Sally Ride proved there is such thing as a stupid question.

When Sally Ride made her first space flight in 1983, she was both the first American woman and the youngest American to make the journey to the final frontier. Both of those distinctions show just how qualified and devoted Ride was to her career, but they also opened her up to a slew of absurd questions from the media.

Journalist Michael Ryan recounted some of the sillier questions that had been posed to Ride in a June 1983 profile for People. Among the highlights:

Q: “Will the flight affect your reproductive organs?”
A: “There’s no evidence of that.”

Q: “Do you weep when things go wrong on the job?”
A: “How come nobody ever asks (a male fellow astronaut) those questions?"

Forget going into space; Ride’s most impressive achievement might have been maintaining her composure in the face of such offensive questions.

2. Had she taken Billie Jean King's advice, Sally Ride might have been a professional tennis player.

When Ride was growing up near Los Angeles, she played more than a little tennis, and she was seriously good at it. She was a nationally ranked juniors player, and by the time she turned 18 in 1969, she was ranked 18th in the whole country. Tennis legend Billie Jean King personally encouraged Ride to turn pro, but she went to Swarthmore instead before eventually transferring to Stanford to finish her undergrad work, a master’s, and a PhD in physics.

King didn’t forget about the young tennis prodigy she had encouraged, though. In 1984 an interviewer playfully asked the tennis star who she’d take to the moon with her, to which King replied, “Tom Selleck, my family, and Sally Ride to get us all back.”

3. Home economics was not Sally Ride's best subject.

After retiring from space flight, Ride became a vocal advocate for math and science education, particularly for girls. In 2001 she founded Sally Ride Science, a San Diego-based company that creates fun and interesting opportunities for elementary and middle school students to learn about math and science.

Though Ride was an iconic female scientist who earned her doctorate in physics, just like so many other youngsters, she did hit some academic road bumps when she was growing up. In a 2006 interview with USA Today, Ride revealed her weakest subject in school: a seventh-grade home economics class that all girls had to take. As Ride put it, "Can you imagine having to cook and eat tuna casserole at 8 a.m.?"

4. Sally Ride had a strong tie to the Challenger.

Ride’s two space flights were aboard the doomed shuttle Challenger, and she was eight months deep into her training program for a third flight aboard the shuttle when it tragically exploded in 1986. Ride learned of that disaster at the worst possible time: she was on a plane when the pilot announced the news.

Ride later told AARP the Magazine that when she heard the midflight announcement, she got out her NASA badge and went to the cockpit so she could listen to radio reports about the fallen shuttle. The disaster meant that Ride wouldn’t make it back into space, but the personal toll was tough to swallow, too. Four of the lost members of Challenger’s crew had been in Ride’s astronaut training class.

5. Sally Ride had no interest in cashing in on her worldwide fame.

A 2003 profile in The New York Times called Ride one of the most famous women on Earth after her two space flights, and it was hard to argue with that statement. Ride could easily have cashed in on the slew of endorsements, movie deals, and ghostwritten book offers that came her way, but she passed on most opportunities to turn a quick buck.

Ride later made a few forays into publishing and endorsements, though. She wrote or co-wrote more than a half-dozen children’s books on scientific themes, including To Space and Back, and in 2009 she appeared in a print ad for Louis Vuitton. Even appearing in an ad wasn’t an effort to pad her bank account, though; the ad featured an Annie Leibovitz photo of Ride with fellow astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Jim Lovell gazing at the moon and stars. According to a spokesperson, all three astronauts donated a “significant portion” of their modeling fees to Al Gore’s Climate Project.

6. Sally Ride was the first LGBTQ astronaut.

Ride passed away on July 23, 2012, at the age of 61, following a long (and very private) battle with pancreatic cancer. While Ride's brief marriage to fellow astronaut Steve Hawley was widely known to the public (they were married from 1982 to 1987), it wasn't until her death that Ride's longtime relationship with Tam O'Shaughnessy—a childhood friend and science writer—was made public. Which meant that even in death, Ride was still changing the world, as she is known as the world's first LGBTQ astronaut.

Remains of World War II Soldier From Texas Finally Identified Nearly 75 Years After His Death

Lexey Swall/Getty Images
Lexey Swall/Getty Images

More than 400,000 American service members died in World War II, and decades after the war's end in 1945, more than 72,000 of them remain unaccounted for. As the Associated Press reports, the remains of one World War II soldier who died in battle 74 years ago were recently identified in a Belgian American cemetery.

Private first class army member John W. Hayes, originally from Estelline, Texas, was fighting for the Allied Powers in Belgium in early 1945. According to witnesses, he was killed by an 88mm gun on a German tank on January 4. The military recorded no evidence of his remains being recovered.

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, a government organization responsible for recovering missing soldiers, suspected that an unidentified body found near the site of Hayes's death and buried in 1948 might be Hayes. In 2018, the agency exhumed the body from a Belgian American military cemetery and analyzed the DNA. Tests confirmed that the grave had indeed been that of John W. Hayes. Now that Hayes has been identified, his body will be transported to Memphis, Texas, and reinterred there on June 19.

Thanks to advances in genetic technology, the government has successfully identified the dozens of World War II military members decades after their deaths. Recently, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency used DNA analysis to identify 186 of the sailors and marines who perished at Pearl Harbor.

[h/t MyHighPlains.com]

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