Tropical Storm Cindy Could Cause Major Flooding Across the Southeast This Week

A water vapor image of Tropical Storm Cindy on June 20, 2017. Darker green indicates higher moisture in the atmosphere.
A water vapor image of Tropical Storm Cindy on June 20, 2017. Darker green indicates higher moisture in the atmosphere.

The stewing heat and humidity of a young summer finally gave way to the first tropical cyclone to threaten the United States this year. Tropical Storm Cindy is gathering steam in the Gulf of Mexico this week, and it promises to bring heavy rains to just about everyone in the southeastern United States. It won’t be a strong storm when it makes landfall, but wind isn’t as much of a concern as the copious amounts of tropical moisture being dragged northward, culminating in lots of precipitation and the potential for flooding.

As of Wednesday, June 21, 2017, tropical storm warnings are in effect for parts of the Gulf Coast from areas west of Houston, Texas, to as far east as Pensacola, Florida. Tropical Storm Cindy had winds up to 60 mph at 8:00 a.m. EDT Wednesday morning, and forecasters expect the storm to maintain winds of around 50 mph as it nears landfall. Winds of 45 mph are what you'd see in a healthy thunderstorm, but constant blustery winds over wet soil will make it easier for trees and power lines to topple over.

The traditional hurricane forecasting map—showing the forecast track of the center of the storm with a cone of uncertainty sweeping along its expected path—doesn't do much good in this situation. Sure, some areas will see gusty winds and power outages, but the real story with Tropical Storm Cindy is its rain. Cindy is a lopsided tropical storm with almost all of its heavy rain and wind shoved off to the east of the low-pressure center by wind shear higher up in the atmosphere. That's common to see in a weak, early season storm like this. Cindy's heavy rain will extend far beyond the center of the storm due to its lopsidedness and large size, so the forecast tracks we're all used to seeing don't go far enough to cover the threat posed by this storm. (If you'd like to see for yourself, forecasts are always available on the National Hurricane Center's website.)

Rain forecasts for Tropical Storm Cindy
The Weather Prediction Center’s rainfall forecast from June 20, 2017, through June 27, 2017
Dennis Mersereau

Tropical Storm Cindy will produce rainfall totals in the double digits in some locations through the end of the week, and the moisture from its remnants will continue to track inland through the weekend. The Tuesday morning precipitation forecast from NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center called for a widespread area across the Southeast to see more than three inches of rain by the time the storm finally clears out of the picture at the end of the week. Moisture from a landfalling tropical system is usually bad enough, but this storm will run into a pesky stationary front draped across inland areas of the Southeast. This front will help wring out the moisture and make it rain harder and longer than it would have otherwise.

This much rain over a short period of time will lead to widespread flooding concerns. If you live in or are visiting affected areas, make sure you know more than one route to get to where you're going. More than half of all deaths in a tropical storm or hurricane are caused by drowning. It's impossible to tell how deep the water is on a road before you drive across it, and it takes a surprisingly small amount of moving water to lift a car and sweep it downstream.

Amazing Timelapse Shows Florida Sky Turning Purple Following Hurricane Dorian

Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Photographs taken of Hurricane Dorian's massive eye and the damage it caused in the Bahamas paint a picture of what it was like to live through the historic storm. But some of the most stunning images to come out of the event were captured after the hurricane had passed. As KENS5 reports, the time-lapse video below shows the sky over Florida turning a unique shade of purple in the wake of Hurricane Dorian.

Dorian skimmed the east side of Florida earlier this week, causing power outages and some flooding. The worst of the storm was over by Wednesday night, but the ominous purple clouds it left behind may have sparked concern among some Florida residents.

A purple sky following a hurricane is the result of a perfectly natural occurrence called scattering. The sky was super-saturated after Dorian arrived, and the moisture in the atmosphere refracted the light of the setting sun. Normally, only the longest wavelengths of light on the color spectrum are visible through the clouds—that's why sunsets often appear gold, pink, and orange.

Violet is the shortest wavelength on the spectrum, which means it's almost never visible in the sky. But the air's high dew point Wednesday night, combined with the dense low-hanging clouds, created the perfect conditions for a rare purple sky.

Locals who've lived through a few hurricanes may have recognized the phenomenon; the same thing happened after Hurricane Michael hit Florida last year.

[h/t KENS5]

See What the Eye of Hurricane Dorian Looks Like From Space

NOAA, Getty Images
NOAA, Getty Images

Hurricane Dorian has already caused damage on the ground, leveling houses and killing at least five people in the Bahamas earlier this week. For people who haven't seen Dorian's power up close, these pictures captured from space put the magnitude of the storm into perspective.

As Live Science reports, the photographs below were taken by European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano aboard the International Space Station. They show the hurricane swirling over the Atlantic, its massive eye in clear view.

The storm has grown even more intense since it was photographed from space. According to a tweet from Parmitano on September 1, the pictures show Dorian as a tropical storm. By the time the system reached the Bahamas on Monday, September 2, it had upgraded to Category 5 hurricane with winds exceeding 185 mph. Dorian has since weakened to a Category 3, but that's still strong enough to cause significant destruction if it makes landfall over the U.S.

After preparing for a direct hit all week, it looks as though the southern U.S. may be spared from the worst of the storm. Projections now show Dorian hugging the Atlantic coast, starting off the coast of Florida and skimming Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. The hurricane is still likely to drive powerful winds and storm surges along the east coast, so local governments are urging residents to take any necessary precautions and be prepared to evacuate if the order is given.

[h/t Live Science]

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