Why Is the Southeast So Humid?

iStock
iStock

You don’t have to hop on a plane to visit the tropics when you live in the southeastern United States—it can often feel like you’re already there. It gets humid in this corner of the country. Not just regular humid, mind you, but so disgustingly moist that you can almost feel the air slosh across your skin as you walk out the front door. But what is it that makes the Southeast so humid compared to the rest of the country?

Mugginess during the summer is a problem just about everywhere you go in the United States. The corn fields of Iowa can see a higher dew point than a rainforest. But even there the steaminess doesn’t last as long as it does in the Southeast. Much of it has to do with the region’s proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, which usually feels like bathwater on a good day. The water in some parts of the Gulf of Mexico can heat up to 90°F during the peak of the summer, and the water isn’t quick to cool down once cold fronts start sweeping through in the fall and winter. The warmth of the Gulf and the Caribbean Sea to its south keep moisture in plentiful supply.

It’s not just the water itself that contributes to the mugginess. The water vapor over the ocean doesn’t migrate inland on its own—weather patterns drag it inland and keep it locked in place. Strong winds blowing counterclockwise around low-pressure systems often help bring this tropical moisture inland, especially during the cooler months when you expect to shiver rather than sweat. During the summer, though, persistent ridges of high pressure keep the southeast feeling gross with a moist southerly wind. These “heat domes” deflect most weather systems approaching from the west, basically locking the Southeast into a state of sultriness for weeks and even months at a time.

The constant moisture isn’t merely uncomfortable—it can be downright dangerous. The human body is able to cool itself when sweat evaporates from the surface of exposed skin. But sweat has a harder time evaporating when there’s too much moisture in the air, which could cause a person to overheat. This phenomenon is measured with the heat index, and it’s the cause of thousands of heat-related illnesses and deaths every year.

All of that moisture makes both day and night downright miserable. If you’ve ever been to the desert during the warmer months, you know firsthand that even on a day when the high temperature exceeds 100°F, the mercury can plummet once the Sun goes down and get chilly enough to require a light jacket. The wild temperature fluctuations in desert regions are due to the dryness of the air there. Moist air has a higher heat capacity, so it takes a lot longer to warm up and cool off.

Meanwhile, the gross humidity levels in the Southeast on most days keep it from getting excessively hot, but it also keeps the nights from cooling off very much. The lack of nighttime relief compounds the danger posed by heat and humidity.

Fall Foliage Is Running Late This Year

Free art director/iStock via Getty Images
Free art director/iStock via Getty Images

The August arrival of the pumpkin spice latte might have you feeling like fall is in full swing already, but plants aren’t quite so impressionable. According to Travel + Leisure, the best fall foliage could be coming a little later than usual this year.

Historically, the vibrant transformation starts to sweep through northern regions of the Rocky Mountains, Minnesota, and New England in mid-September, and reaches its peak by the end of the month. Other areas, including the Appalachians and Midwest states, don’t see the brightest autumn leaves until early or mid-October. The Weather Channel reports that this year, however, the forecast from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts unseasonably warm temperatures for the next two weeks, which could impede the color-changing process.

Warm temperatures aren’t necessarily bad for fall foliage, as long as they occur during the day and are offset by cool nights. Since meteorologists don’t expect the overnight temperatures to drop off yet, plants will likely continue producing enough chlorophyll to keep their leaves green in the coming days.

The good news is that this year’s fall foliage should only be about a week late, and meteorologist David Epstein thinks that when leaves do start to change color, we’re in for an especially beautiful treat. If the current weather forecast holds, he told Boston.com, we'll "see a longer season than last year, we’d see a more vibrant season than last year, and it would come on a little earlier than last year, which was so late.”

Though poor weather conditions like early snow, heavy rain, drought, or strong winds can cause leaves to fall prematurely, most trees right now are in a good position to deliver a brilliant display of color after a healthy, rain-filled summer.

Find out when you’ll experience peak fall foliage in your area with this interactive map.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

Amazing Timelapse Shows Florida Sky Turning Purple Following Hurricane Dorian

Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Photographs taken of Hurricane Dorian's massive eye and the damage it caused in the Bahamas paint a picture of what it was like to live through the historic storm. But some of the most stunning images to come out of the event were captured after the hurricane had passed. As KENS5 reports, the time-lapse video below shows the sky over Florida turning a unique shade of purple in the wake of Hurricane Dorian.

Dorian skimmed the east side of Florida earlier this week, causing power outages and some flooding. The worst of the storm was over by Wednesday night, but the ominous purple clouds it left behind may have sparked concern among some Florida residents.

A purple sky following a hurricane is the result of a perfectly natural occurrence called scattering. The sky was super-saturated after Dorian arrived, and the moisture in the atmosphere refracted the light of the setting sun. Normally, only the longest wavelengths of light on the color spectrum are visible through the clouds—that's why sunsets often appear gold, pink, and orange.

Violet is the shortest wavelength on the spectrum, which means it's almost never visible in the sky. But the air's high dew point Wednesday night, combined with the dense low-hanging clouds, created the perfect conditions for a rare purple sky.

Locals who've lived through a few hurricanes may have recognized the phenomenon; the same thing happened after Hurricane Michael hit Florida last year.

[h/t KENS5]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER