24 Vintage Photographs of Abe Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln’s personal secretary John Nicolay believed that no photograph could capture Honest Abe’s essence: “There are many pictures of Lincoln,” he said, “[but] there is no portrait of him.” Over 130 photographs of Lincoln exist—here are a few you may not have come across before.

The daguerreotype above, taken around 1846, is the earliest known photo of Lincoln. He was 37 years old and had just started campaigning for national office. Lincoln would later win a seat in the US House of Representatives as a member of the Whig party, a spot he held for two years.

In 1854, Lincoln returned to politics. This photo was taken in Chicago while he campaigned for a spot in the Senate. At this time, Lincoln publicly declared his distaste for slavery. He lost the election.

A reporter once described Lincoln’s mop as “Wild Republican hair.” In this 1857 photo, Abe looks like he just got out of bed.

In 1858, Lincoln squared off against Stephen Douglas for Illinois’ Senate seat. The battle sparked seven heated debates on slavery. Here, supporters gather outside Lincoln’s Springfield home. Lincoln is the tall, white figure by the doorway.

Lincoln said this was one of his favorite photographs. He used it heavily during the 1858 campaign, distributing it to supporters.

It’s the summer of 1860, and Lincoln stands outside his Springfield home with his two sons, Willie and Tad (Abe is the tall one behind the fence). Although it was the heat of his presidential run, Lincoln had time to relax at home. He made no speeches during the campaign; his success rode on a wave of outside support.

When Lincoln won the election, an 11-year-old girl named Grace Bedell wrote the President-elect a letter: “You would look a great deal better [if you grew a beard] for your face is so thin. All the ladies like whiskers and they would tease their husbands to vote for you and then you would be President.” Lincoln took her advice, and his beard was born. In this early 1861 photograph, you can see Lincoln growing out his famous stubble. Lincoln later visited the little girl and told her, “Gracie, look at my whiskers. I have been growing them for you.”

Here’s what the crowd looked like at Lincoln’s 1861 inauguration. The Capitol Building’s dome was still incomplete.

Here, Lincoln stands with Allan Pinkerton (left) and Gen. John McClernand (right). Pinkerton was a Union spy who had saved Lincoln’s life by foiling an early assassination plot. McClernand, an Illinois democrat, was one of Lincoln’s closest friends.

Lincoln greets some troops after the Battle of Antietam in September 1862. General McClernand stands far right while Lincoln faces Gen. George McClellan (middle). McClellan, who was not fond of the president, would run against Lincoln in the 1864 presidential election.

Lincoln with McClellan after Antietam. Antietam was the first major Civil War battle to happen on Union soil. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history: 23,000 casualties and over 3,500 killed.

Lincoln sits with his private secretaries, John Nicolay (left) and John Hay (right), on November 8, 1863. Hay wrote in his diary that it was the best picture of the President he had ever seen.

Lincoln before giving the Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863. He’s the hatless one in the very middle. Lincoln’s famous speech was only 10 sentences long.

Lincoln walks to the podium to give the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln appears to be the figure in the middle, his iconic stovepipe hat peeping over the crowd, though other historians believe Lincoln is elsewhere in the crowd.

Lincoln addresses the crowd at his second inauguration ceremony in January March 1865.

Here’s a close-up, as Lincoln reads from the podium.

It’s 1865, and Abe sports a frazzled hairdo that’s a wee bit ahead of his time. It’s believed that Lincoln combed his hair high in this picture because he had a life mask appointment.

Lincoln with his son, Tad, in 1865. By this time, Lincoln had already lost his son Willie to typhoid.

Lincoln reads with his son, Tad, in February 1865. This is the only known picture of Lincoln wearing spectacles. It’s also no surprise that Lincoln is holding a book. Lincoln had only one year of schooling, but his deep love of reading catapulted him ahead of his formally educated competitors.

This is Lincoln’s last portrait, purportedly taken on April 10, 1865—one week before his assassination. It’s also one of the few portraits that shows Lincoln grinning.

Lincoln was shot April 14, 1865, at Ford’s Theater. Lincoln’s body toured the US for three weeks. The funeral train stopped in New York on April 25 and was displayed in City Hall, shown here.

Lincoln’s hearse proceeds through New York City. The house on the left corner is the home of Cornelius Roosevelt, the grandfather of Teddy Roosevelt. You can see Teddy and his brother, Elliott, peering out the shuttered window on the second story.

Lincoln’s Hearse.

By 1900, Lincoln’s tomb in Springfield, Ill. was falling apart. Plans to renovate the tomb were made, and his body was exhumed, shown here. His coffin was then opened to ensure that burglars hadn’t stolen anything. His body was incredibly well preserved: everything—including his beard—was still intact.

15 of the World's Most Popular Beaches as Seen From Above

Biletskiy_Evgeniy/iStock via Getty Images
Biletskiy_Evgeniy/iStock via Getty Images

Planning your next great beach vacation? See what the world's most popular spots for sun and sand look like from the sky.

1. South Beach // Miami Beach, Florida

Shadow of airplane arriving in Miami
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Miami Beach, Florida’s South Beach is a major entertainment area, attracting tourists from all over the world to enjoy the city's unique nightlife, shopping, and restaurants.

2. Bondi Beach // Sydney, Australia

Aerial view of Bondi Beach in Australia
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With its breathtaking views and vibrant beach culture, it's no wonder that Bondi Beach is one of Australia's most iconic destinations.

3. Tulum, Mexico

Aerial view of a beach in Tulum, Mexico
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Tulum, Mexico's crystalline beaches are just one part of what makes this seaside town the third most visited site in Mexico.

4. Surin Beach // Phuket, Thailand

Aerial view of Surin Beach in Phucket, Thailand
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Acting more like a coastal village than a beach resort, Thailand’s Surin Seach is also known as "Millionaire's Row" because it's lined with luxury resorts that are filled with A-list celebrities.

5. Waikiki Beach // Honolulu, Hawaii

Aerial image of tropical Waikiki Beach Honolulu Hawaii
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Located in the Hawaiian capital of Honolulu, Waikiki Beach—which is 2 miles long—accounts for about 42 percent of the state’s annual tourist industry revenue.

6. Deauville Beach // Normandy, France

Aerial view of Deauville beach in Normany, France
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Deauville Beach in Normandy, France is often referred to as the "queen of the Norman beaches." In addition to being surrounded by a ton of history, it's one of the most prestigious seaside resorts in all of France.

7. Navagio Beach // Zakynthos, Greece

Aerial view of Navagio Beach in Zakynthos, Greece
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Located in the Ioanian Islands of Greece, Navagio Beach, a.k.a. Shipwreck Beach, is a secluded cove and is often cited as the most beautiful beach in Greece (which is pretty high praise when you consider the competition).

8. Trunk Bay // St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

Aerial view of Trunk Bay in St John in United States Virgin Islands
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St. John’s most famous beach, Trunk Bay, has a snorkeling trail for its visitors that includes information about coral formations and sea life.

9. Maya Bay // Phi Phi Islands, Thailand

Aerial view of Maya Bay in Phi Phi Island in Thailand
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Danny Boyle's 2000 film The Beach, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, may have been a box office dud—but it made a star out of its filming location in Thailand. So much so that the beach became a sort of victim of its own success; because of the amount of tourists it attracted (it was regularly called "the most famous beach in Thailand"), it closed to tourists in 2018. Earlier this year, officials announced a tentative reopening in the summer of 2021.

10. Anse Source d’Argent // Seychelles

Aerial view of Anse Source D'argent in Seychelles
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Located in the Seychelles, an archipelago off the cost of East Africa, Anse Source d'Argent—with its pink sands and rows of beaches—is a great place to both relax and explore.

11. Isola Bella // Taormina, Sicily

Aerial view of Isola Bella at Taormina in Sicily
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Isola Bella, one of Sicily’s most beautiful beaches, is located in Taormina, a small hilltop town that is also home to Teatro Antico di Taormina, an ancient theater that's still in use today.

12. Newport Beach, California

Aerial view of Newport Beach, California
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Whether it’s hiking or water activities, Newport Beach has plenty to do for both sunbathers and adventure-seekers.

13. Railay Beach // Thailand

Aerial view of Railay Beach in Thailand
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Getting to Thailand’s Railay Beach is part of the adventure: It's a small peninsula that is only accessible by boat.

14. Surfer’s Paradise // Queensland, Australia

Aerial view of Surfers Paradise in Queensland, Australia
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This seaside resort in Eastern Australia offers great views and majestic waves, making it truly live up to its name.

15. Kamari Beach // Santorini, Greece

Aerial view of Kamari Beach in Greece
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Kamari Beach resides on one of Greece’s most popular islands, Santorini, and is notable for its unique black sand.

Amazing Time-Lapse Shows Leaves Dramatically Changing Color During Fall

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RCKeller/iStock via Getty Images Plus

During autumn, the leaves of many of our deciduous trees change color before falling off and dying. Sad, right? It depends on how you look at it.

Owen Reiser—a very patient mathematics and biology student at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville—spent more than a month filming the color-changing process to create an ambitious, two-minute time-lapse video featuring close-ups of leaves transforming from yellow and green to red and brown.

“I was taking a field biology class and we were learning about deciduous trees,” Reiser told Smithsonian. “I’ve been getting into wildlife photography and time-lapse for a while, and I couldn’t find a time-lapse of leaves changing color, so I just went for it.”

It took Reiser six weeks—and many sleepless nights—to compile the footage. He snapped more than 6000 close-up photos of leaves, including images from 10 different Midwestern deciduous trees, such as sassafras and sugar maple. He took a photo of each leaf once every 30 to 60 seconds for three days using a camera, a LED light, and a battery that allowed his camera to run constantly. “It’s [basically] a cardboard box and a bunch of duct tape, but it gets the job done,” he said.

You can see the green and yellow leaves quickly fill with reds and browns; new colors dramatically take over, and pigments break down. It looks like “dye spreading through fabric,” according to Smithsonian.

But what occurs when the leaves alter color isn’t so simple. “People argue that the red color is [also] an unmasking from the breakdown of chlorophyll, and that’s simply wrong,” David Lee, professor emeritus in biological sciences at Florida International University, told Smithsonian. “The red color is actually made when the chlorophyll is beginning to break down—there’s a synthesis of those pigments, so it’s quite a different thing.”

Either way, after watching the video, you'll never look at fall foliage the same way again.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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