Hear The Most Popular 7 Seconds of Drumming Ever Recorded

iStock
iStock

by James Hunt / Mental Floss UK

In May 1969, a funk and soul group called The Winstons released a single: Color Him Father. It sold over a million copies and eventually reached number seven on the Billboard Hot 100, winning a Grammy the following year. But despite the lead track's popularity, its B-side, Amen Brother, contains what may be the most listened-to slice of music from the last century.

When it was released, the song - an instrumental cover of Jester Hairston's 1963 song, Amen - went virtually ignored in favor of the acclaimed lead track. But in the years since, a seven-second drum solo performed by Gregory Cylvester "G. C." Coleman halfway through the song has been sampled over and over again, to the point where entire musical genres are based around it. At current estimates, over 2,000 released tracks make use of it, and more are created every day.

The drum solo became known as the Amen Break (a break is a section of a song where all but one instrument, usually drums, stop for a few seconds) after - by chance or providence - it gained popularity in the hip-hop scene of the mid 1980s. The nature of the solo allowed a number of different sounds to be cut up and rearranged to form entirely new beats, enhancing its popularity with sampling artists looking for clean drum loops to base their tracks around.

The earliest appearance of the sample on a released record is the track I Desire, from Salt-N-Pepa's 1986 debut album Hot, Cool & Vicious, though it also appears on Stetsasonic's 1986 track, Bust That Groove. Just two years later, it appeared on 10 albums (including NWA's seminal Straight Outta Compton), and by the mid-90s it was routinely appearing on hundreds of releases a year, buoyed by its discovery by British dance music producers who used it as the very basis for the new jungle music scene.

By 1997, it had become so popular that it appeared on both Oasis' hit song, D'You Know What I Mean, and David Bowie's Little Wonder, despite the artists having nothing to do with the subcultures that popularised it. According to WhoSampled, a site which tracks the use of common samples, it has already been featured on 6 releases this year, averaging more than one a week.

It's hard to say why this break snowballed in popularity over any others, though some experts say it's because the break's syncopated (irregular) rhythm means it's possible to create lots of variations by sampling and rearranging the track without making the joins too obvious.

And while the members of the band never received royalties from the use of their recording, a 2015 online campaign by British DJ's Martyn Webster and Steve Theobald raised £24,000 for Richard Spencer, the frontman and only living member of the group that produced the recording.

You can listen to the full version of The Winston's Amen Brother using the YouTube link below, but the famous moment occurs at 1:26 in. Even if you've never heard it before, we're confident you'll recognise the sound of those drums - and from now on, you'll notice them everywhere.

Image: BigStock

It's Official: Benedict Cumberbatch Is Confirmed for Doctor Strange Sequel

Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

Just when Marvel fans began focusing all of their attention on poring over even the tiniest details in the Avengers: Endgame trailer, Marvel has announced that a Doctor Strange sequel is officially happening.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Scott Derrickson will return to the director’s chair, and although he co-wrote the first film alongside Jon Spaihts and C. Robert Cargill, no writer has been announced for the second outing yet.

Benedict Cumberbatch will, of course, reprise his role as Dr. Stephen Strange, and Benedict Wong will be returning as Wong. Industry insiders suspect Rachel McAdams will be back as Strange’s love interest, Dr. Christine Palmer, but no formal announcement has been made.

We last saw Doctor Strange earlier this year in Avengers: Infinity War, where he sadly disintegrated into dust at the hands of Thanos’s snap. As most fan theories believe, many of our favorite superheroes will be brought back to life in Avengers: Endgame, which will be the next time we see Cumberbatch’s character. Although his appearance in Avengers: Endgame might only be through flashbacks, and Doctor Strange 2 could still take place before Infinity War, it’s not likely.

Sources say production is being eyed for a spring 2020 start, with a suspected release date around spring 2021. But a lot can happen between now and then, especially depending on what Avengers: Endgame reveals.

George RR Martin Swears He'll Finish The Winds of Winter—He Just Won't Say When

Rich Polk, Getty Images for IMDb
Rich Polk, Getty Images for IMDb

It would be an understatement to say Game of Thrones fans are in a bit of distress right now. For one, we have the eighth and final season of the HBO series, which will premiere in April, looming over us. At the same time, we’re scrambling to gather any information we can about the Game of Thrones prequel series. But above all, we’re waiting for George RR Martin to finish The Winds of Winter, the next novel in his A Song of Ice and Fire series, which inspired the beloved TV show.

The Winds of Winter has been particularly difficult for Martin to finish, according to the acclaimed author. In order to keep active, he has focused his efforts on other projects, such as his recently released companion book Fire and Blood. This perceived procrastination hasn't sat well with his fans—some of whom are convinced we will never see his ending to the story.

Martin has heard all the complaints, and took to his blog on December 10 to give an update on the novel that fans have been awaiting for more than seven years, writing:

"[M]y thanks go out to my fans and readers. I know you want WINDS, and I am going to give it to you ... but I am delighted that you stayed with me for [the new book Fire & Blood] as well. Your patience and unflagging support means the world to me. Enjoy the read. Me, I am back in my fortress of solitude, and back in Westeros. It won’t be tomorrow, and it won’t be next week, but you will get the end of A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE."

While there's no reason to doubt the veracity of Martin's promise, fans are understandably still skeptical. After The Winds of Winter, there’s still one more novel, A Dream of Spring, to close out the story. At this point, we’re probably better off counting down the days until Game of Thrones's final season premieres ... or the prequel series.

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