THE KNOWLEDGE FEED

5 Questions: LIQUID REFRESHMENT

Questions:5
Available:Always
Pass rate:75 %
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5 Questions: "Ata" Boy

Questions:5
Available:Always
Pass rate:75 %
Backwards navigation:Forbidden

That baritone voice behind the Jolly Green Giant’s “ho-ho-ho” belongs to the late Elmer "Len" Dresslar Jr., a Chicago-area jazz singer.

That baritone voice behind the Jolly Green Giant’s “ho-ho-ho” belongs to the late Elmer "Len" Dresslar Jr., a Chicago-area jazz singer.

5 Questions: HORSING AROUND

Questions:5
Available:Always
Pass rate:75 %
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It took three people to compose “The Hokey Pokey." Roland Lawrence “Larry” LaPrise, Charles Macack, and Taft Baker wrote the tune in 1949 to entertain tired skiers at nightclubs in Sun Valley, Idaho.

It took three people to compose “The Hokey Pokey." Roland Lawrence “Larry” LaPrise, Charles Macack, and Taft Baker wrote the tune in 1949 to entertain tired skiers at nightclubs in Sun Valley, Idaho.

5 Questions: WHAT A CROC

Questions:5
Available:Always
Pass rate:75 %
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The Poltergeist 30th Anniversary Quiz

Questions:12
Available:Always
Pass rate:75 %
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Thirty years ago this summer, the classic horror film Poltergeist scared moviegoers. How much do you remember about the plight of the Freeling family and the beast that haunted them?

Opossums don't "play dead." When frightened, they become overexcited and pass out.

Opossums don't "play dead." When frightened, they become overexcited and pass out.

With a nurse and a calligrapher, Saddam Hussein had a copy of the Koran written using his own blood.

With a nurse and a calligrapher, Saddam Hussein had a copy of the Koran written using his own blood.

5 Questions: SEE-THROUGH

Questions:5
Available:Always
Pass rate:75 %
Backwards navigation:Forbidden

Due to the “naughty” dancing of the can-can girls and the scantily clad models on 1800s French postcards, the British equated anything risqué with France. In fact, that's how the phrase “pardon my French” entered the vernacular.

Due to the “naughty” dancing of the can-can girls and the scantily clad models on 1800s French postcards, the British equated anything risqué with France. In fact, that's how the phrase “pardon my French” entered the vernacular.

5 Questions: WHEN "PUSH" COMES TO SHOVE

Questions:5
Available:Always
Pass rate:75 %
Backwards navigation:Forbidden

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