THE KNOWLEDGE FEED

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7 Surprising Uses for Tequila

Jennifer M Wood

Mexico’s patron spirit is good for more than just one hell of a hangover

Why Cows Might Lose the Milk Market to Camels

the mag

Behind the Scenes of the NYC Subway, Where Trains Are Run on 1930s Switchboards

Shaunacy Ferro

Why Thailand’s Drivers Love Al Pacino Mud Flaps

Keith Cuenca

Or Frank Serpico mud flaps, technically.

The Original Locations of 30 Famous Food Chains

Alex Watt

Ever wonder where your favorite fast food chain first popped up? Look no further.

Japanese Man Grows Star Wars Art In Paddy Field

Mental Floss UK

The team’s inspiration for one particular paddy came from a galaxy far, far away.

14 Not-So-Dirty Facts About ‘Dirty Dancing’

Garin Pirnia

Nobody puts these facts in a corner.

11 Ways to Brew Better Coffee at Home

Drew Moody

Improving your morning cup may be easier than you think.

An Animated Look at Wind Turbines

Rebecca OConnell

This handy graphic breaks down how wind is converted into the electricity that powers our homes.

These Gelatinous Blobs Clone Themselves—and Fight Climate Change

Hannah Keyser

Sea salps are washing up on shores around the East Coast. Take a look at these incredible animals.

Pop Culture Syllabus: Diners

the mag

The classic American diner has inspired a great many works of art over the years.

4 Future Gadgets That Could Alert You to Spoiled Food

Shaunacy Ferro

Say goodbye to sniffing sour milk.

Foundations of a Potentially Record-Breaking Building Being Used as Fish Farms

Caitlin Schneider

The Sky City tower in Changsha, China was set to be the tallest building in the world. Two years after construction began, it's being repurposed as a fish farm.

6 Weird Things Embedded in City Streets

Bess Lovejoy

When you're hitting the city streets, take a second to look down at the pavement. Plenty of strange things have been known to be stuck or embedded in the pavement.

Richard Francis Burton: The Englishman Who Went to Mecca and East Africa

the mag

More than a century before Indiana Jones first cracked his whip, Sir Richard Francis Burton had already mastered the daring art of scholarly adventure.

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