Big Questions - Trivia, Quizzes, and Brain Teasers

The past six Fridays, Catholics observing Lent have skipped sirloin in favor of fish sticks. Why?

Whether you prefer Thin Mints or Samoas, the pint-sized entrepreneurs peddling their sweet treats are making an awful lot of dough off of our national obsession with Girl Scout cookies. In fact, all told, the Girl Scout Cookie Program is an $8 million business. So where does all that money go?

I have been living in Philadelphia for 9 years now, and while I can tell a Philly accent when I hear one, I cannot figure out how to do it myself.

Thanks to MTV, we all know what Spring Break is about: Bikinis, debauchery, plenty of alcohol, and collegiates flocking to beaches en mass to work on their tans and run amok. Where did this tradition start?

In Super Mario Bros., Mario has a pretty rough day. He's forced to rescue a princess completely on his own, which seems suspicious given the fact that most royal families have designated security details at their disposal. What kind of third-rate dynasty hires a plumber to save an heiress?

In 2001, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) determined that English would, from then on, be the standardized language of air travel, and issued a directive that stated that all aviation personnel—pilots, flight crews, and air traffic controllers—must pass an English proficiency test.

The debate has been raging at least since the 1870s, when our evolutionary theory forefathers Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace disagreed as to how and why the zebra got his stripes.

Last week, a study by Chinese and American scientists revealed another reason to not pee in pools, which had more to do with chemistry than good manners.

The "funny bone" is neither funny (when you whack it on the edge of a piece of furniture), nor a bone (whether you whack it or not). Where'd the name come from, and why is it so painful?

Along with serving as the names of two villainous eels in Disney's animated classic The Little Mermaid, the phrase “flotsam and jetsam” is often used to describe the floating debris found in the aftermath of an accident at sea. And while it might initially seem like a strange moniker for maritime wreckage, there's a very good reason for the two-part terminology.