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Attika Architekten

Architect Incorporates Concrete Emojis Into His Building Design

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Attika Architekten

Emojis aren't the quintessential example of timeless design—and that’s why architect Changiz Tehrani decided to stamp them into the facade of his building in the Netherlands. As The Verge reports, the cheeky emoticons are a way to link the structure to the 2010s for decades to come.

The building, which includes retail and residential space, is made from red brick striped with concrete bands. The wall facing the town square in Amersfoort features 22 emoji faces peering out from the concrete. On the other sides of the building those spaces are filled with plain circles.

To make the emojis, Tehrani—of the Dutch architecture firm Attika Architekten—chose designs from the WhatsApp emoji keyboard. The pictographs were then made into molds and cast in concrete before going up on the side of the structure.

When explaining his thought process, Tehrani compared the web-era ornaments to the stone busts of kings and queens used in architecture centuries ago. “If you look at history, people always think ‘Oh this is timeless,’ or ‘This will stay forever,’ and they’re always wrong,” he told The Verge. “So we were thinking, what can we use as an ornament so when you look at this building in 10 or 20 years you can say ‘hey this is from that year!’”

The building was completed in 2015, and the emojis have managed to stay relevant for at least two years. Students in the nearby school are constantly snapping pictures of the facade, though Tehran says he doesn’t know if older residents like (or recognize) the design elements.

[h/t The Verge]

All images courtesy of Attika Architekten

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MODS International, Amazon
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You Can Now Shop for Tiny Houses on Amazon
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MODS International, Amazon

Whether you’re in the market for board games, boxed wine, or pickup trucks, you can likely find what you’re looking for on Amazon. Now, the web retailer’s catalogue of 400,000,000 items includes actual homes. As Curbed reports, Amazon will deliver a tiny house made from a shipping container to your current place of residence.

The pint-sized dwelling is made by the modular home builder MODS International, and is selling for $36,000 (plus $3754 for shipping, even for Prime members). The container is prefabricated and move-in ready, with a bedroom, shower, toilet, sink, kitchenette, and living area built into the 320-square-foot space. The tiny house also includes heating and air conditioning, making it a good fit for any climate. And though the abode does have places to hook up sewage, water, and electrical work, you'll have to do a little work before switching on a light or flushing the toilet.

Becoming a homeowner without the six-digit price tag may sound like a deal, but the MODS International home costs slightly more than the average tiny house. It’s not hard for minimalists to find a place for about $25,000, and people willing to build a home themselves can do so without spending more than $10,000. But it's hard to put a price on the convenience of browsing and buying homes online in your pajamas.

[h/t Curbed]

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For the First Time in 40 Years, Rome's Colosseum Will Open Its Top Floor to the Public
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iStock

The Colosseum’s nosebleed seats likely didn’t provide plebeians with great views of gladiatorial contests and other garish spectacles. But starting in November, they’ll give modern-day tourists a bird's-eye look at one of the world’s most famous ancient wonders, according to The Telegraph.

The tiered amphitheater’s fifth and final level will be opened up to visitors for the first time in several decades, following a multi-year effort to clean, strengthen, and restore the crumbling attraction. Tour guides will lead groups of up to 25 people to the stadium’s far-flung reaches, and through a connecting corridor that’s never been opened to the public. (It contains the vestiges of six Roman toilets, according to The Local.) At the summit, which hovers around 130 feet above the gladiator pit below, tourists will get a rare glimpse at the stadium’s sloping galleries, and of the nearby Forum and Palatine Hill.

In ancient Rome, the Colosseum’s best seats were marble benches that lined the amphitheater’s bottom level. These were reserved for senators, emperors, and other important parties. Imperial functionaries occupied the second level, followed by middle-class spectators, who sat behind them. Traders, merchants, and shopkeepers enjoyed the show from the fourth row, and the very top reaches were left to commoners, who had to clamber over steep stairs and through dark tunnels to reach their sky-high perches.

Beginning November 1, 2017, visitors will be able to book guided trips to the Colosseum’s top levels. Reservations are required, and the tour will cost around $11, on top of the normal $14 admission cost. (Gladiator fights, thankfully, are not included.)

[h/t The Telegraph]

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