Color Your Way Through Air Pollution With a Climate Change Coloring Book

A new coloring book will help you understand just how much climate change is altering our world. The Climate Change Coloring Book contains 20 different coloring activities related to the causes and effects of climate change. Some are directly related, like coloring in the amount of Arctic ice that has been lost over the last two decades, while others are more metaphorical ways of understanding environmental change, such as a page that instructs you to color in 20 football fields in a minute, representing the speed and magnitude of forest destruction over the past 25 years.

Created by American Museum of Natural History data artist Brian Foo, the activities draw on data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NASA, the EPA, and other reputable sources.

As trendy as adult coloring books are, visualizing air pollution with colored pencils isn’t exactly a de-stressing activity. The books are designed for middle school ages and up, and they’re probably better suited to a classroom than to an adult coloring session. But if you want to color your way to climate change activism, who are we to stop you?

The books cost $15 on Kickstarter and are expected to ship in July. They are, of course, made with recycled paper.

[h/t FlowingData]

All images courtesy Brian Foo / Kickstarter

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Are You Eco-Conscious? You Could Win a Trip to the Dominican Republic
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iStock

Do you love lounging on the beach but also want to take action to save the planet? You'll be able to do both if you're chosen to serve as a "sustainability advisor" for a luxury resort in the Dominican Republic, Lonely Planet reports.

The worldwide contest is sponsored by Eden Roc at Cap Cana in Punta Cana. The winner and one friend will receive a five-night stay at the Relais & Châteaux hotel, where they'll partake in specially curated activities like a food-sourcing trip with the hotel's chef. (One caveat, though: Airfare isn't included.)

You don't need a degree in conservation to enter, but you will need an Instagram account. Give the resort's Instagram page (@edenroccapcana) a follow and post a photo of you carrying out an eco-friendly activity on your own page. Be sure to tag the resort and use the official hashtag, #EcoEdenRoc.

The only requirement is that the winner meet with hotel staff at the end of his or her trip to suggest some steps that the hotel can take to reduce its environmental impact. The hotel has already banned plastic straws and reduced its usage of plastic bottles, and the sole mode of transport used on site is the electric golf cart.

Beyond the resort, though, the Dominican Republic struggles with deforestation and soil erosion, and the nation scored poorly on the 2018 Environmental Performance Index for the agricultural category.

Entries to the contest will be accepted until August 31, and you can read the full terms and conditions here.

[h/t Lonely Planet]

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Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
How a Hairdresser Found a Way to Fight Oil Spills With Hair Clippings
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images
Mark Ralston, AFP/Getty Images

The Exxon Valdez oil tanker made global news in 1989 when it dumped millions of gallons of crude oil into the waters off Alaska's coast. As experts were figuring out the best ways to handle the ecological disaster, a hairdresser from Alabama named Phil McCroy was tinkering with ideas of his own. His solution, a stocking stuffed with hair clippings, was an early version of a clean-up method that's used at real oil spill sites today, according to Vox.

Hair booms are sock-like tubes stuffed with recycled hair, fur, and wool clippings. Hair naturally soaks up oil; most of the time it's sebum, an oil secreted from our sebaceous glands, but it will attract crude oil as well. When hair booms are dragged through waters slicked with oil, they sop up all of that pollution in a way that's gentle on the environment.

The same properties that make hair a great clean-up tool at spills are also what make animals vulnerable. Marine life that depends on clean fur to stay warm can die if their coats are stained with oil that's hard to wash off. Footage of an otter covered in oil was actually what inspired Phil McCroy to come up with his hair-based invention.

Check out the full story from Vox in the video below.

[h/t Vox]

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