PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images
PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images

The UK Driving Test Will Soon Include a GPS Navigation Section

PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images
PHILIPPE HUGUEN/AFP/Getty Images

The UK is changing its driver’s license testing, and the process is getting a technological update for the modern era. As part of the practical exams given to new drivers starting in December 2017, potential licensees will have to prove that they are capable of navigating by GPS, The Verge reports.

According to the government announcement on the changes to the test, most would-be drivers will be required to follow directions from a satellite navigation device during their test. This “independent driving” portion of the test will last 20 minutes, about half the total amount of time of the exam. (The rest of the time drivers get turn-by-turn instructions from the person evaluating them.) Not everyone will be subject to the GPS test, though; one out of every five students will be asked to navigate based on traffic signs instead. The new exam procedure will debut on December 4, 2017.

It’s not a quiz about following directions—if you make a wrong turn, you won’t be penalized, unless you make a driving mistake that would otherwise get you dinged in another part of the test. You’re also allowed to ask the examiner for confirmation about where you’re headed. So it’s more of a test of your multitasking skills than your navigational ones.

[h/t The Verge]

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Why an Ex-FBI Agent Recommends Wrapping Your Keys in Tinfoil Whenever You Leave Your Car
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iStock

A car thief doesn't need to get their hands on your keys to break into your vehicle. If you use a wireless, keyless system, or fob, to unlock your car, all they need to do is steal the signal it emits. Luckily there's a tool you can use to protect your fob from hackers that you may already have in your kitchen at home: tinfoil.

Speaking with USA Today, retired FBI agent Holly Hubert said that wrapping car fobs in a layer of foil is the cheapest way to block their sensitive information from anyone who may be trying to access it. Hackers can easily infiltrate your car by using a device to amplify the fob signal or by copying the code it uses. And they don't even need to be in the same room as you to do it: They can hack the fob inside your pocket from the street outside your house or office.

Electronic car theft is a growing problem for automobile manufacturers. Ideally fobs made in the future will come with cyber protection built-in, but until then the best way to keep your car safe is to carry your fob in an electromagnetic field-blocking shield when you go out. Bags made specifically to protect your key fob work better than foil, but they can cost more than $50. If tinfoil is all you can afford, it's better than nothing.

At home, make sure to store your keys in a spot where they will continue to get protection. Dropping them in a metal coffee can is a lot smarter than leaving them out in the open on your kitchen counter.

[h/t USA Today]

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Low on Gas? You Can Now Get It Delivered to You
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iStock

If you live in a major city, there’s virtually nothing you can’t get delivered straight to your house. Forget groceries and takeout; you don’t even have to get yourself to the gas station anymore. As Lifehacker reports, there’s a service that will fill up your tank for you while your car is parked in your driveway.

Yoshi, an app-based service that brings car care to you, is currently available in more than 10 different cities across the U.S. It not only sells fuel-ups on demand, but also offers oil changes, car washes, repairs, tire checks, and other basics of car maintenance.

To fuel up, you plug in your car’s location on the Yoshi app and set up a delivery. Then, all you need to do is make sure that your car is in the right place and the door to the gas tank is open, and Yoshi will swoop in and fill ‘er up.

Yoshi sells its gas based on AAA price averages in your area, so the service isn’t as pricey as you might think, though you definitely do have to pay for the convenience. If you’re just looking to occasionally buy gas, Yoshi charges a $7 delivery fee. If you plan to use the service regularly, membership costs $20 a month and includes free fuel delivery every week.

The service is certainly a luxury, but if it’s difficult for you to get to a gas station regularly, that $7 delivery fee could be the difference between a smooth ride and running out of gas.

[h/t Lifehacker]

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