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How Often You Should Do 12 Household Chores

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Ah, spring cleaning: the most daunting of seasonal rituals. Scouring the bathroom tiles and organizing your closet may be a drag, but if you stay on top of your weekly and monthly chores, keeping your home fresh and tidy will be a much more manageable feat. Here’s how often you should tackle 12 household tasks.

1. CLEAN YOUR MICROWAVE // WEEKLY

Many people think the heat in the microwave will kill all the germs and bacteria in the food you're heating, but this isn’t the case, says Mitrovic, founder of the cleaning service Uber Clean House in Melbourne, Australia. “It’s important to properly clean your microwave at least once a week,” Mitrovic recommends. Do this by microwaving a large cup of water, vinegar, and a chopped-up lemon until the solution boils and steams the window.

2. CLEAN YOUR KITCHEN RANGE HOOD // DAILY

You should wipe down the hood as part of your daily kitchen routine, says Harriet Jones, cleaning supervisor with Go Cleaners London. “However, you can clean the filter monthly—the more frequently you clean the filter, the easier it will be,” Jones says.

3. CHANGE YOUR SHEETS // WEEKLY

Sweat, dust mites, and dirt accumulate very quickly, especially since you’re typically lying on those sheets for eight hours every night, says Becky Rapinchuk, author of Simply Clean and blogger at CleanMama.net. The sheets should be washed using hot water (130 to 150°F) and a hot dryer cycle to kill the germs.

4. INSPECT YOUR DRYER VENTS // ANNUALLY

It’s important to inspect and clean the vents—and replace them if necessary—because they accumulate lint that is highly flammable and can cause a fire, Jones says. Depending on the number of people in your family and the dryer’s use, you may need to do this more frequently than once per year.

5. WASH YOUR PILLOWS // EVERY SEASON

Your pillowcases put a barrier between you and your pillows, but they still collect sweat, saliva, and other body fluids, says Nic Croughan, interiors expert at Custom Curtains in the United Kingdom. Wash instructions will vary by pillow (is it down, synthetic, or memory foam?), so check the manufacturer's instructions before throwing in the washing machine or dryer.

6. CLEAN YOUR REFRIGERATOR // EVERY OTHER WEEK

To avoid moldy food build-up (and so you don’t completely forget what’s in there), it’s important to give your fridge the attention it deserves, says Tova Weinstock, a professional organizer and cleaning enthusiast based in Brooklyn. “Also, fridges get dirty from spills, loose food particles, and even dust,” Weinstock says.

7. CLEAN YOUR WINDOW TREATMENTS // AS NEEDED

Wooden and Venetian blinds require a weekly dusting, while fabric curtains can get away with being washed annually—the exception being if your window dressing is in a particularly damp space, such as in the bathroom or above a sink. Then you'll need to clean it more often, advises Croughan. “We recommend using steam as an effective cleaning method, and if your curtains are very expensive, turn to a professional,” Croughan says.

8. CLEAN YOUR OVEN // EVERY FOUR TO SIX MONTHS

Accumulated grease and grime over time will cause the oven to use more power when it's turned on, which will lead to higher bills, says Lauren Haynes, cleaning expert with Star Domestic Cleaners. It can also ruin the taste of the food, she says.

9. WASH YOUR TOWELS // EVERY THREE OR FOUR USES

After drying off, it’s best to leave your towel in a well-ventilated place so that it can air-dry completely, Jones says. This will keep the bacteria at bay for a couple uses—but then it's time to throw your towel in the wash.

10. CLEAN YOUR TOILET // WEEKLY

It’s estimated that there are nearly 50 bacteria per square inch on the seat of the toilet, Jones says. To deep clean your toilet, cleaning expert Leslie Reichert tells TODAY that you should turn off the water to your toilet and give it a flush to completely empty the bowl of water. Then sprinkle a homemade baking-soda-based cleaning solution (or a store-bought toilet cleaner) into the toilet bowl and give it a good scrub with a scrubby sponge (while wearing gloves, of course!). Then add a cup of distilled white vinegar and allow to sit for one hour.

11. CLEAN YOUR FAN VENTS // MONTHLY

Dust, pollen, and other allergens can block the vents, Jones says. “If you have any refurbishment work done, you definitely need to clean, or at least inspect, the vents, as construction work spreads sawdust throughout the house, which can cause increased suffering of people with allergies or asthma,” she says.

12. CLEAN YOUR COUCH // ANNUALLY

“Along with brightening its appearance, regular cleaning will eliminate bacteria rooted deep in the furniture’s fibers, and leave your couch smelling fresh,” Jones says. “Cleaning your upholstery will also reflect on the air quality and will reduce the risk of mold and mildew growing.” If it's been a while since you've had your upholstered furniture cleaned (or if you never have), it might be worth investing in a professional cleaning.

All images courtesy of iStock.

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Pop Culture
The House From The Money Pit Is For Sale

Looking for star-studded new digs? For a cool $5.9 million, Top10RealEstateDeals.com reports, you can own the Long Island country home featured in the 1986 comedy The Money Pit—no renovations required.

For the uninitiated, the film features Tom Hanks and Shelley Long as hapless first-time homeowners who purchase a rundown mansion for cheap. The savings they score end up being paltry compared to the debt they incur while trying to fix up the house.

The Money Pit featured exterior shots of "Northway," an eight-bedroom estate located in the village of Lattingtown in Nassau County, New York. Luckily for potential buyers, its insides are far nicer than the fictional ones portrayed in the movie, thanks in part to extensive renovations performed by the property’s current owners.

Amenities include a giant master suite with a French-style dressing room, eight fireplaces, a "wine wall," and a heated outdoor saltwater pool. Check out some photos below, or view the entire listing here.

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

The real-life Long Island home featured in 1986's “The Money Pit”
TopTenRealEstateDeals.com

[h/t Top10RealEstateDeals.com]

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Live Smarter
How to Keep Your Water Pipes From Freezing This Winter
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Recently, a frozen pipe burst in the basement of Stephen King collector Gerald Winters, allowing for gushing water that destroyed a number of original King manuscripts. It wasn't the first time freezing temperatures allowed for property destruction, and it certainly won't be the last.

When supply lines freeze, the ice has no room to expand, causing water pressure to build up between the blockage and the closed faucet. When it bursts, the damage can be significant. New Orleans-based CBS affiliate WWLTV recently shared steps from the American Red Cross that homeowners can take to minimize their risk of a winter disaster.

If you have pipes that are located near exterior walls prone to cooler temperatures or in uninsulated areas of your basement, try letting a small trickle of cold water run through household faucets. The continuous movement of the water will prevent the line from succumbing to pressure. You can also buy insulation or heat-capturing foil tape from a local hardware store. Keeping pipes insulated will help them retain heat in winter and prevent them from "sweating" in summer.

If the worst happens and you come home to a frozen line—you'll know because the faucet won't be working—then you'll have to thaw out the pipe before it has a chance to burst and cause water damage. With the faucet running, find the source of the blockage by looking at the supply line for frost or bulging; apply heat to the affected pipes with a space heater, hair dryer, or some hot towels.

If fate has dealt you a truly bad hand and you discover that a pipe has burst, you'll need to act quickly: Broken pipes can dump more than 250 gallons of water a day. Know the location of your main incoming water line and turn it off, then head for the phone to notify a plumber.

There's not exactly a set temperature where you should be more concerned about a frozen pipe. Even at higher temperatures, a pipe's location and incoming cold snaps can cause problems. Seal cracks in walls near pipes if you can, and consult with a professional about rerouting pipes if they're in a problem area. With a little foresight, you can prevent a king-sized (or King-sized) disaster.

[h/t WWLTV.com]

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