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People Tossed $1.5 Million Into Rome’s Trevi Fountain Last Year

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If you’ve ever visited Rome, you’ve probably heard that the best way to ensure a return visit is by using your right hand to toss a coin over your left shoulder and into the Trevi Fountain. Whether or not you believe in the legend, plenty of people have given it a try—enough that nearly $1.5 million in loose change was dropped into the iconic landmark last year alone.

So just where does all that pocket change go? To charity. "The [city] council hands over to us bags full of coins thrown into the fountain," Alberto Colajacomo, spokesman for Caritas, the nonprofit Catholic organization that receives and reinvests the loot, told NBC News. And it’s more than just coins. "Among the coins often we find other objects, including glasses, religious medals, and even a couple of dentures," Colajacomo said.

Originally opened in 1762, the Trevi Fountain is one of Rome’s most recognizable sites (it has made memorable appearances in movies like Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita and William Wyler’s Roman Holiday, too).

Thanks to the fashionable folks at Fendi, it recently underwent a major renovation to restore its facade and add some LED lights and other modern features. It’s also a popular venue for getting arrested; just this week, a man was put into handcuffs for taking a naked dip in the fountain in front of a crowd of amused onlookers. More often, people get into trouble for treating the fountain like their personal piggybank, which is against the law, so you’ll want to refrain from trying to fish your coin back out. Your dentures, however, are another story.

[h/t NBC News]

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This Russian Kindergarten Looks Just Like a Castle
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A group of lucky kindergarteners in Russia don’t have to wear poufy dresses or plastic crowns to pretend they’re royalty. As Atlas Obscura reports, all they have to do is go to school.

In a rural area of Russia's Leninsky District sits a massive, pastel-colored schoolhouse that was built to resemble Germany's famed Neuschwanstein Castle. It has turrets and gingerbread-like moldings—and instead of a moat, the school offers its 150 students multiple playgrounds, a soccer field, a garden, and playhouses.

Tuition is 21,800 rubles (about $360) a month, but the Russian government subsidizes it to make it less expensive for parents. As for the curriculum: it’s designed to promote social optimism, and each month’s lesson plan is themed. (September, for example, will be career-focused.)

Take a video tour of the school below, or learn more on the school’s website.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

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This Chinese Library's Interior Is Designed to Look Like an Infinite Tunnel of Books
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The Chinese city of Yangzhou is known for its graceful arched bridges and proximity to the Yangtze River and the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal. Architects kept these unique local features in mind while designing Zhongshuge Yangzhou, a new bookstore and library that was completed in 2016.

Designed by Shanghai studio XL-Muse Architects, the building has black, mirrored floors and arched ceilings that symbolize Yangzhou’s famous waterways and overpasses. The floor reflects the store’s curving shelves to create the illusion of a never-ending tunnel of books—a true bibliophile’s dream.

Learn more about Yangzhou’s unique library/bookstore below, courtesy of Great Big Story.

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