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The Most Common Second Languages Spoken Around the World

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According to some estimates, at least half of the world is bilingual, and among some populations, that number is significantly higher—95 percent of Latvians speak more than one language, for instance.

And that second language likely varies with geography. Americans living near the Mexican border are more likely to learn Spanish as a second language than someone in Latvia, where people are much more likely to find themselves in Russia than in Spain.

The international moving company Movehub mapped out the most common languages people learn in addition to their native tongue, and you might be surprised by how common certain languages are regionally. The data is sourced from the CIA’s world fact book, and some places aren’t included (Colombia and Myanmar, for instance).

As you might have gathered, English is a very popular second language. In fact, it’s the most popular second language in 55 countries. French (coincidentally, one of the easiest languages to learn) comes in second, but only 14 countries have it as their most common second language, which is a far cry from 55.

Peruse some of the other languages commonly studied as a second language in the infographic:

[h/t Digg]

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All the Plastic Ever Produced, Visualized
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Humanity has a plastic problem. The cheap, durable material has become a vital part of our vehicles, food packaging, and even the inner structures of our homes. We’ve already produced 8.3 billion metric tons of the stuff, and most of it is sitting in landfills where it could take centuries to break down.

In early 2017, a study published in the journal Science Advances highlighted the literal weight of this growing issue. Researchers calculated that the bulk of all the plastic that’s been made by humans is equivalent to that of 25,000 Empire State Buildings or 80 million blue whales. Of that, only 9 percent has been recycled. The amount of plastic waste currently trashing our planet adds up to 6.3 billion metric tons, and the researchers don’t see our plastic addiction getting any less severe in the near future. By 2050, the plastic in our landfills is expected to hit 12 billion metric tons. You can see more alarming statistics from the study in the infographic below.

Infographic showing plastic production statistics.
University of Georgia, Janet A Beckley

Of all the trash we produce, plastic is some of the toughest to get rid of [PDF]. Scientists are looking into solutions, such as plastic-chomping caterpillars and germs, but for now consumers can do the planet a favor by investing in more reusable goods.

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Live Smarter
Dislike a Coworker? Here's How to Handle It
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Whether you spend your days sitting in a classroom or toiling away in a cubicle, there are always going to be people you just don’t like. But while we’re able to say “See ya” to locker room bullies and cafeteria gossip, it’s not so easy to escape peer tensions in the workplace.

Some coworkers might be bullies or micro-managers, while others may not see eye-to-eye with your company vision. Instead of butting heads with these figures—especially when quitting isn’t an option—try implementing some of the strategies listed in the infographic below.

Created by NetCredit, an online personal loan company, and spotted by Entrepreneur, the diagram explains how to stand your ground, foster dialogue, and keep your cool while navigating tricky office conflicts. From verbal communication strategies to body language cues, there are plenty of ways to make even the unfriendliest coworker respect you—even if you'll never be getting together for drinks after work.

An infographic by NetCredit on how to get along with difficult co-workers.
NetCredit

[h/t Entrepreneur]

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