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Hidden Figures Is Coming to Classrooms

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The real-life story behind the hit movie Hidden Figures doesn't end once the credits roll; for educators, there's now a free curriculum to use in the classroom that shines a light on the pioneering African-American women of NASA's space program.

Published by Journeys in Film, this Hidden Figures curriculum is made up of eight lesson plans aimed primarily at social studies classes, covering topics such as the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, and the math of space travel. In addition to fleshing out the social and political climate that Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Dorothy Vaughan were living in, some courses also focus on the movie itself, with attention paid to the filmmaking techniques used and an analysis of the shooting script.

The curriculum also provides activities revolving around the role of women in STEM, including a breakdown of notable figures, group projects, and information on how students can channel their academic passions into a career. Handouts, quizzes, YouTube links, and related articles are all included in the curriculum to help flesh out the provided material.

Journeys In Film is a nonprofit organization that advocates the use of film as a means of teaching broader lessons in the classroom. The curriculum, which comes in at over 140 pages, can be downloaded for free here. And you can pick up Hidden Figures on 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray, and DVD today.

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Can You Figure Out How Many Triangles Are in This Picture?

Time for another brain teaser. How many triangles do you see here? A Quora user posted the image above (which we spotted on MSN) for fellow brainiacs to chew on. See if you can figure it out. We’ll wait.

Ready?

So, as you can see, all the smaller triangles can combine to become bigger triangles, which is where the trick lies. If you count up every different triangle formed by the lines, you should get 24. (Don’t forget the big triangle!)

Some pedantic Quora users thought it through and realized there are even more triangles, if you really want to go there. There’s a triangle formed by the “A” in the signature in the right-hand corner, and if we’re counting the concept of triangles, the word “triangle” counts, too.

As math expert Martin Silvertant writes on Quora, “A triangle is a mathematical idea rather than something real; physical triangles are by definition not geometrically perfect, but approximations of triangles. In other words, both the pictorial triangles and the words referring to triangles are referents to the concept of a triangle.” So yes, you could technically count the word “triangle.”  (Silvertant also includes a useful graphic explaining how to find all the pictorial triangles.)

Check out the whole Quora discussion for in-depth explainers from users about their methods of figuring it out.

[h/t MSN]

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This Puzzling Math Brain Teaser Has a Simple Solution
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Fans of number-based brainteasers might find themselves pleasantly stumped by the following question, posed by TED-Ed’s Alex Gendler: Which sequence of integers comes next?

1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221, ?

Mathematicians may recognize this pattern as a specific type of number sequence—called a “look-and-say sequence"—that yields a distinct pattern. As for those who aren't number enthusiasts, they should try reading the numbers they see aloud (so that 1 becomes "one one," 11 is "two ones," 21 is "one two, one one,” and so on) to figure the answer.

Still can’t crack the code? Learn the surprisingly simple secret to solving the sequence by watching the video below.

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