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The '90s Called: Original Tamagotchis Are Coming Back

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Like the school project eggs and crying baby dolls that came before them, Tamagotchis taught '90s kids real responsibility. The handheld digital pets were needy little pixels that demanded constant attention, food, and cleanings. Armed with just three buttons, Tamagotchi owners had to take care of their creatures by raising them from eggs and keeping them alive.

Now today's youth can also attempt to parent digital pets: According to The Telegraph, the beloved gadgets are making a comeback. After both Furby and Trolls made their own triumphant returns, it only makes sense to see other classic toys try to court a new generation of kids. Bandai is re-releasing their original line-up of Tamagotchis featuring the 1996 characters some of us grew up with. The newly designed eggs are currently on sale on Amazon Japan for around ¥2000 (about $18).

Despite the simple nature of the toy, the plastic devices were a huge hit, with over 76 million being sold around the world. Since the success of the handheld games, the franchise has expanded into other realms like video games and board games. This latest venture is a return to form, embracing the old characters and repackaging them in a new, smaller device.

[h/t Telegraph]

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video
This Puzzling Math Brain Teaser Has a Simple Solution
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Fans of number-based brainteasers might find themselves pleasantly stumped by the following question, posed by TED-Ed’s Alex Gendler: Which sequence of integers comes next?

1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221, ?

Mathematicians may recognize this pattern as a specific type of number sequence—called a “look-and-say sequence"—that yields a distinct pattern. As for those who aren't number enthusiasts, they should try reading the numbers they see aloud (so that 1 becomes "one one," 11 is "two ones," 21 is "one two, one one,” and so on) to figure the answer.

Still can’t crack the code? Learn the surprisingly simple secret to solving the sequence by watching the video below.

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Art
A Beached Whale Sculpture Popped Up on the Banks of Paris's Seine River
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In Paris, dozens of fish varieties live in the Seine River. Now, the Associated Press reports that the famous waterway is home to a beached whale.

Rest assured, eco-warriors: The sperm whale is actually a lifelike sculpture, installed on an embankment next to Notre Dame Cathedral by Belgian artists’ collective Captain Boomer. It’s meant to raise environmental awareness, and evoke "the child in everyone who still is puzzled about what is real and what is not,” collective member Bart Van Peel told the Associated Press.

The 65-foot sculpture has reportedly startled and confused many Parisians, thanks in part to a team of fake scientists deployed to “survey” the whale. One collective member even posted a video on social media, warning Parisians that there “may be others in the water” if they opt to take a dip in the river, The Local reported.

The whale sculpture is only temporary—but as for Captain Boomer, this isn’t their first whale-related stunt. Last summer, the collective installed a similar riverside artwork in Rennes, France, and they also once strapped a large-scale whale sculpture to the back of a truck and drove it around France.

[h/t Associated Press]

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