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Restoration of Old Army Tank Turns Up $2.5 Million in Gold

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Collecting old army tanks is an expensive hobby, but for Nick Mead it appears to have paid off. After finding an ex-Iraqi Army Type 69 tank on eBay, he opened it up to find that someone had left several solid gold bars inside. All together, the stash amounts to roughly $2.5 million.

Mead is a tank collector and owner of Tanks-A-Lot in the United Kingdom, a company that specializes in renting out armored vehicles for film shoots and recreations. According to Jalopnik, he was conducting a routine strip-down of his latest purchase when he came upon some machine gun ammo that someone left inside. He opened up the fuel tank expecting to find the guns that went with it, filming the process in case he needed to explain the discovery to the police. But instead of guns, he found gold—at least five bullion bars worth, weighing 12 pounds each.

The gold was likely looted by Iraqi soldiers during the invasion of Kuwait in 1990, Popular Mechanics reports, which means the forgotten riches had been sitting in the tank for decades. Mead had traded a pair of vehicles valued at $37,000 for the treasure-filled tank. The gold bars have since been turned over to authorities for analysis, but if Mead does get to keep them the trade will have been well worth the investment.

[h/t Jalopnik]

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11 Honorable Ways You Can Help Veterans
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This Veterans Day, make a difference in the lives of former military members. Just thanking a veteran can go a long way, but an act of kindness means even more. Here are 11 ways you can show vets that you appreciate the sacrifices they made.

1. PICK UP THE TAB FOR THEIR COFFEE OR MEAL.

The next time you see a veteran in a restaurant or standing in line for coffee, pick up the tab. You can do so anonymously if you would prefer, but even a quick "thank you for your service" would mean a lot to the veteran. You don’t have to limit yourself to dinner or a latte—you could pay for a tank of gas, a prescription, or a cart of groceries.

2. DRIVE A VET TO A DOCTOR’S APPOINTMENT.

Many vets, especially those who are infirm or disabled, have trouble making it to their doctor appointments. If you have a driver’s license, you can volunteer for the Department of Veterans Affairs (DAV) Transportation Network, a service provided by all 197 VA medical facilities. To help, contact the hospital service coordinator [PDF] at your local VA Hospital.

3. TRAIN A SERVICE DOG.

Service dogs are a great help to veterans with mobile disabilities and post-traumatic stress disorder, helping them rediscover physical and emotional independence. It takes approximately two years and $33,000 to properly train one service dog, so donations and training volunteers are critical. Even if you aren’t equipped to train a dog, some organizations need "weekend puppy raisers," which help service dogs learn how to socialize, play, and interact with different types of people.

There are several organizations that provide this service for veterans, including Patriot Paws and Puppy Jake.

4. REPLACE ONE LIGHT BULB WITH A GREEN ONE.

The "Greenlight a Vet" project is a simple way to remind yourself and others about the sacrifices veterans have made for our country, and to show your appreciation to them. Simply purchase a green bulb and place it somewhere in your home—a porch lamp is ideal since it’s most visible to others. Over 9 million people across the nation have logged their green lights into the project's nationwide map so far.

5. HELP SPONSOR AN HONOR FLIGHT.

Many of the veterans who fought for our freedoms have never seen the national memorials honoring their efforts—and their fallen friends. Honor Flights helps send veterans of World War II, Korea, and Vietnam to Washington D.C. to see their monuments. You can help sponsor one of those flights for as little as $4.

6. WRITE A LETTER.

Operation Gratitude is an organization that coordinates care packages, gifts, and letters of thanks to veterans. You can work through them to send your appreciation to a vet, or volunteer to help assemble care packages. And, if you still have candy kicking around from Halloween, Operation Gratitude also mails sweets to deployed troops. 

7. VOLUNTEER AT A VA HOSPITAL.

Whatever your talents are, they’ll certainly be utilized at a Veterans Hospital. From working directly with patients to helping with recreational programs or even just providing companionship, your local VA Hospital would be thrilled to have a few hours of your time.

8. GET INVOLVED WITH THE VETERANS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.

There are no doubt veterans in your community that could use help—but how do you find them? Contact the Local Veterans Assistance Program. They’ll be able to put you in touch with local vets who need help doing chores like yard work, housework, grocery shopping, or running errands.

9. HELP THEM WITH JOB TRAINING.

Adjusting back to civilian life isn't always smooth sailing. Hire Heroes helps vets with interview skills, resumes, and training so they can find a post-military career. They even partner with various employers to host a job board. Through Hire Heroes, you can help veterans with mock interviews, career counseling, job searches, workshops, and more.

10. HELP BUILD A HOUSE.

Building Homes for Heroes builds or modifies homes to suit the needs of veterans injured in Iraq or Afghanistan. The houses are given mortgage-free to veterans and their families. You can volunteer your painting, carpentry, plumbing, wiring, and other skilled services—or you can just donate to the cause.

11. VOLUNTEER FOR A STAND DOWN.

The VA continually hosts Stand Downs, one- to three-day events that give much-needed supplies and services to homeless veterans. Vets can receive everything from food and clothing to health screenings, housing solutions, substance abuse treatment, and mental health counseling. They take place at various places across the nation all year long, so contact the representative in your state about when and how you can volunteer.

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11 Things You Might Not Know About the Marine Corps
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“The few, the proud” who serve are not only part of one of the most effective fighting forces in history, but also one of the most storied organizations in the world. Here are 11 things you might not know about the Marines.

1. THE FIRST RETIRED MARINE TO EVER RECEIVE AN HONORARY PROMOTION WAS IN A STANLEY KUBRICK MOVIE.

In Full Metal Jacket, actor Tim Colceri is famous for his helicopter scene where he says over the roar of the helicopter, "Anyone who runs is a VC. Anyone who stands still is a well-disciplined VC." He would have been even more famous in the part for which he was originally cast—as the strict and unrelenting senior drill instructor, Gunnery Sergeant Hartman. That role, however, went to R. Lee Ermey, who had been hired for the film as a technical advisor.

Ermey, a former Marine drill instructor and Vietnam veteran, filmed a tense 20-minute reel of himself in character dressing down and squaring away the movie’s extras, without repeating himself. When director Stanley Kubrick saw the video, he recast Ermey for the role on the spot.

The fictional Hartman became perhaps the most famous gunnery sergeant in the history of the Corps. Ermey retired as a Staff Sergeant, and in 2002, the Marine Corps granted him an honorary promotion in accordance with the rank for which he is most associated. He is the first retiree in the history of the Marines to receive such an honor.

2. THE MARINES' HYMN REFERS TO THE BATTLE OF CHAPULTEPEC.

The Marines’ Hymn famously begins, “From the Halls of Montezuma...” This refers to the Battle of Chapultepec in 1847, in which U.S. Marines conquered Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City and subsequently occupied the city as part of the Mexican-American War. The battle is also famous (according to Marine tradition) for the establishment of the “blood stripe,” a red stripe sewn into the trousers of the uniform commemorating the Marines killed at Chapultepec.

3. "THE SHORES OF TRIPOLI" IS A REFERENCE TO THE FIRST OVERSEAS LAND BATTLE FOUGHT BY THE UNITED STATES MILITARY.

In 1801, the United States decided to do something about piracy in the Mediterranean so President Jefferson sent in the Navy. In 1805, the Marines finished the job. The Battle of Derne, on the shores of Tripoli during the First Barbary War, was the decisive action of the war, and the first overseas land battle fought by the United States military.

4. THE "LEATHERNECK" NICKNAME IS A HISTORIC ONE.


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In 1798, the Marine Corps began issuing "one stock of black leather and clasp" to Marines. The item was worn to protect their necks when fighting with swords. Today, the standing collar on the dress coat of the Marine Corps uniform is a vestige of the leatherneck tradition.

5. THE MARINES WERE HELD BACK AT NORMANDY.

The purpose of the Marine Corps is amphibious warfare, or attacking the land by storming from the sea. And yet the Marines are largely absent from the Normandy Invasion—history’s most famous amphibious assault. Why did the Army get the job?

More people. The Army had 89 divisions; the Marine Corps had 6. (As goes the saying, “The Marines win battles; the Army wins wars.”) And almost all of the Marines were in the Pacific. But there was a contingent of Marines on board the U.S.S. Texas who were held back, probably because of the ongoing rivalry between the Army and the Marines. Because the leaders of the Allied Forces were Army generals, there was no chance they’d share the spotlight on the biggest operation of the war. Even when the invasion looked grim, the Marines who watched from the U.S.S. Texas were never unleashed. As journalist W. Thomas Smith has written, the leadership didn’t want headlines the next day to read “Marines save Rangers at Normandy.”

Marines assigned to the Office of Strategic Services, forerunner to the CIA and U.S. Army Special Forces, were on the ground, however, secretly working as observers of the invasion and facilitators for Army paratroopers who were jumping behind enemy lines.

6. WHEN THE FAST FOOD WARS ARE FOUGHT, A MARINE WILL COME OUT ON TOP.

In the 1993 film Demolition Man, Sandra Bullock’s character makes reference to the Fast Food Wars, of which only one restaurant survived—Taco Bell. This is probably in no small part because the founder of Taco Bell was Glen Bell, a Marine who served in the Pacific Theater in World War II.

The Fast Food Wars would have been quite savage, however. Mike Ilitch, the late founder of Little Caesars, and Tom Monoghan, founder of Domino's Pizza, are also former Marines.

7. AN AMERICAN TO ORBIT THE EARTH? YOU'RE GONNA NEED A MARINE FOR THAT.

During the Korean War, a Marine Corps fighter pilot nicknamed “Magnet Ass” shot down three MiG fighter jets. (He earned his nickname because of how often shrapnel hit his planes.) None of that was scary enough, apparently, because after he got back from the war, he became a test pilot. As part of Project Bullet, he set the transcontinental speed record, flying a Vought F8U Crusader from California to New York at 725.55 miles per hour. (The project was so named because he flew faster than a .45-caliber pistol round.) By the time the pilot—John Glenn—was recruited by NASA and became the first American to orbit the Earth, it must have seemed like a pretty boring day at the office. In 1998, we strapped him into another spacecraft and made him the oldest person to ever go into space, at age 77. It was a safe bet because clearly the man was invincible.

8. THERE ARE SOME PRETTY FAMOUS MARINES WHO AREN'T FAMOUS FOR BEING MARINES.

Before he became famous for co-hosting The Tonight Show, Ed McMahon was a Marine fighter pilot with six air medals and 85 combat missions under his belt. While Drew Carey was a reservist in the Marines and looking for a way to make a little extra money, he tried stand-up comedy—and it worked. Robert Ludlum’s time in the Marine Corps no doubt informed his novels about a super-spy named Jason Bourne. And Paulie probably could have taken Rocky in a fight; actor Burt Young is a former Marine.

9. THE CORPS WAS BORN IN A BAR.

The U.S. Marine Corps was born on November 10, 1775, the day the Second Continental Congress passed the Continental Marine Act of 1775, ordering “That two battalions of Marines be raised.” The Continental Marines disbanded in 1783 and was formally reestablished in 1798. The first Marines enlisted at Tun Tavern in Philadelphia, which is considered the birthplace of the Marine Corps.

During the annual birthday celebration, Order No. 47 is read, which says, in part, “it is fitting that we who are Marines should commemorate the birthday of our corps by calling to mind the glories of its long and illustrious history.” The commanding officer cuts the birthday cake, and the first piece is given to the oldest Marine present, who passes it to the youngest Marine present.

10. THE PHRASE "A FEW GOOD MEN" IS OLDER THAN THE MODERN MARINE CORPS.

On March 20, 1779, Captain William Jones of the Continental Marines placed a recruiting advertisement in the Providence Gazette: "The Continental ship Providence, now lying at Boston, is bound on a short cruise, immediately; a few good men are wanted to make up her complement." He’s been recruiting Marines ever since.

11. IF YOU'RE FIGHTING A WAR IN SPACE, YOU'RE GOING TO NEED A FEW GOOD MEN.

Marines don’t just fight on Earth. Popular culture has the Corps on planet Mars in the video game Doom; on moon LV-426 in the film Aliens (“Game over man! Game over!”); in the tabletop role playing game Warhammer 40,000 (“Give me a hundred Space Marines. Or failing that give me a thousand other troops”), and on planet Pandora in the film Avatar (“was a marine. A warrior of the Jarhead Clan”).

This post originally ran in 2012.

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