CLOSE
Norwegian Coastal Administration/Appex via YouTube
Norwegian Coastal Administration/Appex via YouTube

Norway Proposes Plan to Build the World’s First Ship Tunnel

Norwegian Coastal Administration/Appex via YouTube
Norwegian Coastal Administration/Appex via YouTube

Navigating the waters around Norway could soon become a lot easier for large vessels. As CNN reports, the Norwegian Coastal Administration wants to build a tunnel that offers ships safe passage through the Stad Peninsula. The mile-long, 118-foot-wide structure would be the first of its kind designed for full-sized ships.

By using the new route, captains would be able to avoid the perilous coastline of the Stad Peninsula. The area’s stormy weather and varied underwater topography create harsh conditions that can lead shipwrecks. Ships currently have to wait for storms to pass to travel along the coast, but the new tunnel would allow as many as five boats to bypass the region in an hour.

If the project moves past the proposal stage, engineers will be tasked with clearing nearly 8 million tons of rock to make it a reality. About $315 million must be invested in the tunnel before it’s ready to open in 2023. And for those of you imagining the wrecks bound to occur when two 17,000-ton cruise ships meet in the middle, the Norwegian Coastal Administration has that covered: Traffic lights at both entrances will be installed to prevent any naval traffic accidents.

[h/t CNN]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
science
Ocean Waves Are Powerful Enough to Toss Enormous Boulders Onto Land, Study Finds
iStock
iStock

During the winter of 2013-2014, the UK and Ireland were buffeted by a number of unusually powerful storms, causing widespread floods, landslides, and coastal evacuations. But the impact of the storm season stretched far beyond its effect on urban areas, as a new study in Earth-Science Reviews details. As we spotted on Boing Boing, geoscientists from Williams College in Massachusetts found that the storms had an enormous influence on the remote, uninhabited coast of western Ireland—one that shows the sheer power of ocean waves in a whole new light.

The rugged terrain of Ireland’s western coast includes gigantic ocean boulders located just off a coastline protected by high, steep cliffs. These massive rocks can weigh hundreds of tons, but a strong-enough wave can dislodge them, hurling them out of the ocean entirely. In some cases, these boulders are now located more than 950 feet inland. Though previous research has hypothesized that it often takes tsunami-strength waves to move such heavy rocks onto land, this study finds that the severe storms of the 2013-2014 season were more than capable.

Studying boulder deposits in Ireland’s County Mayo and County Clare, the Williams College team recorded two massive boulders—one weighing around 680 tons and one weighing about 520 tons—moving significantly during that winter, shifting more than 11 and 13 feet, respectively. That may not sound like a significant distance at first glance, but for some perspective, consider that a blue whale weighs about 150 tons. The larger of these two boulders weighs more than four blue whales.

Smaller boulders (relatively speaking) traveled much farther. The biggest boulder movement they observed was more than 310 feet—for a boulder that weighed more than 44 tons.

These boulder deposits "represent the inland transfer of extraordinary wave energies," the researchers write. "[Because they] record the highest energy coastal processes, they are key elements in trying to model and forecast interactions between waves and coasts." Those models are becoming more important as climate change increases the frequency and severity of storms.

[h/t Boing Boing]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
science
Climate Change Is Making Nearly All Sea Turtles Born on These Beaches Female
iStock
iStock

Climate change can wipe out a species's food source and destroy its habitat, but rising temperatures are having a more surprising effect on green sea turtles that's no less devastating. According to a report in Current Biology [PDF], up to 99.8 percent of the green sea turtles born on certain beaches in Australia are female, a direct result of the area's warmer-than-average temps.

A turtle's sex is determined by its environment. As The Washington Post reports, a clutch of eggs that incubates in sand that's roughly 85°F will produce about 50 percent females and 50 percent males. A few degrees cooler and the batch skews male; a bit hotter and it's majority female.

This evolutionary mechanism tends to balance itself out, but on beaches in northeast Australia, it's being hijacked by climate change. In order to gauge the size of the impact, researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration sampled the nesting beaches along the coast of Australia adjacent to the Great Barrier Reef, the part that has seen the most dramatic temperature rises and coral bleaching. What they found on the warmer northern beaches was the worst-case scenario: 99.1 percent of juveniles, 99.8 percent of subadults, and 86.8 percent of the overall population was female. Data taken from the southern beaches are only slightly less alarming: Turtles hatched in the relatively cooler sands there were still 65 to 69 percent female. According to the study's authors, "the complete feminization of this population is possible in the near future." That would affect the species' future population growth.

Green sea turtles aren't the only species vulnerable to huge sex shifts by way of climate change. Many other reptiles also rely on temperature-dependent sex determination to keep populations balanced. But above-average temperatures can do more harm beyond messing with sex development: It can also kill embryos before they have the chance to hatch. The authors emphasize that figuring out how to regulate sand temperatures at key rookeries will be essential moving forward. If not, the species could face "a population collapse—or even extinction."

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios