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Patrick Swayze’s Road House Sweatpants Are Up for Sale

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YouTube

Hollywood memorabilia is big business, with one-of-a-kind keepsakes like James Bond’s Aston Martin from Goldfinger and Marilyn Monroe’s flirty white dress from The Seven Year Itch fetching well into the millions when they hit the auction block. But for fans of so-bad-they’re-good ‘80s action movies, the holy grail of movie relics has just gone up for sale: Patrick Swayze’s low-riding, and ass-kicking, sweatpants from Road House.

The lace-up, elastic-hemmed sweats should have gotten equal billing with Swayze—if not an Oscar nomination—for their durability alone, as they played a key role in many of the film’s most awesomely brutal fight scenes. Like this one:

And while pain don’t hurt, the cost of these drawers could leave your wallet with a bit of a bruise: though the current bid is a fairly reasonable $400, Julien’s Auctions estimates that the final bid will likely be at least double that—in the $800 to $1200 range. But they’re not the only Road House keepsakes: a pair of black tank tops that Swayze trained in should sell for about $600 to $800, while this jarring tan and red suit combo he wore is expected to fetch as much as $3000.

The items are part of a much larger online auction of Property From The Estate of Patrick Swayze, which will run through April 28. In addition to some of the late actor’s personal belongings—including clothing, furniture, art, antiques, and an impressive number of cowboy boots and hats—there are many more movie mementos. Like the leather biker jacket Swayze was wearing when he declared that “Nobody puts Baby in a corner” in Dirty Dancing (you’re going to want scrape together about $6000 to buy that) and the maroon silk shirt and Reeboks he haunted Demi Moore in (in a romantic way) in Ghost.

But, let’s get back to those sweatpants … Will they hug the pubis as snugly as they did in the movie when practicing roundhouse kicks in real life? Only one lucky bidder will find out.

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fun
These Super Realistic Ski Masks Let Your Inner Animal Come Out
Beardo
Beardo

No matter how serious you are about your skiing performance, it doesn't hurt to have a sense of humor on the slopes. These convincing animal masks spotted by My Modern Met make it easy to have fun while tearing up the trails.

Each animal mask from the Canadian apparel company Beardo is printed with a photorealistic design of a different animal's face. Skiers can disguise themselves as a bear, dog, fox, orangutan, or even a grumpy-ish cat while keeping their skin warm. The only part of the face that stays exposed is around the eyes, but a pair of ski goggles allows wearers to disappear completely into their beastly persona.

The playful gear is practical as well. The stretchy polyester material is built to shield skin from wind and UV rays, while the soft fleece lining keeps faces feeling toasty.

Beardo's animal ski masks are available through their online store for $35. If you like to stay cozy in style, here are more products to keep you warm this winter.

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

Animal ski mask.
Beardo

[h/t My Modern Met]

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Learn to Tie a Tie in Less Than 2 Minutes
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iStock

For most men—and Avril Lavigne-imitators—learning to tie a tie is an essential sartorial skill. Digg spotted this video showing how you can tie one the simple way, with a tabletop method that works just as well if you’re going to wear the tie yourself or if you're tying it together for someone else who doesn't share your skills.

The whole technique is definitely easier to master while watching the video below, but here's a short rundown: As laid out by the lifehack YouTube channel DaveHax, the method requires you to lay the tie out on a table, folded in half as if you're about to loop it around your neck.

With the back of the tie facing up, you loop over each end, then twist the thinner of the two loops around itself so it ends up looking like a mini-tie knot itself. You'll end up nestling the two loops together and snaking the thin tail of the tie through the whole thing. Then, essentially all you have to do is pull, and you can adjust the tie as you otherwise would to put it over your head.

Unfortunately, this won't teach you how to master the art of more complicated neckwear styles like the fancier Balthus knot or even a bow tie, but it's a pretty good start for those who have yet to figure out even the simplest tie fashions.

[h/t Digg]

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