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How Much Money Was Actually Stolen in Hollywood's Biggest Heist Films?

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The stakes are high in any good heist film, but just how high? Some movie heists involve millions of dollars—but others involve billions. The van insurance experts at Gocompare.com crunched some numbers to figure out how Hollywood's biggest heist movies stack up, comparing the hauls from heists in movies like Die Hard, The Italian Job, Goldfinger, Now You See Me, and even The Pink Panther.

Die Hard—both the first and third installments in the series—sits high on the list of most expensive movie heists. Die Hard With a Vengeance, the third installment, was a battle over $140 billion; in the original, the bad guys were trying to get away with $640 million. Compare that to Heat’s $1 million.

The movies, dating back to 1956, are ranked numerically based on the value of their stolen goods. The infographic also notes the primary motive for the crime, the getaway vehicle, and whether or not the perpetrators were successful. (Spoiler alert: only 41 percent were.)

There are a few reasons why the numbers may not be perfect, though. Some of the values come from the films themselves, but where that wasn’t possible, the creators calculated the estimated value of the items stolen instead. They didn't adjust for inflation, either, which could be relevant in the case of some older films. CBC News has previously calculated the value of the gold in Goldfinger to be much lower than is tabulated here—at $86.4 million based on the price of gold today, but more like $12.5 million when you consider the value of gold in 1964. But then again, what thief wouldn’t exaggerate their haul?

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From Snoopy to Shark Bait: The Top Slang Word in Each State
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iStock

There’s a minute, and then there’s a hot minute. Defined as “a longish amount of time,” this unit of time is familiar to Alabamians but may stir up confusion beyond the state’s borders.

It’s Louisianans, though, who feel the “most misunderstood,” according to the results of a survey regarding regional slang by PlayNJ. Of the Louisiana residents surveyed, 72 percent said their fellow Americans from other states—even neighboring ones—have a hard time grasping their lingo. Some learned the hard way that ordering a burger “dressed” (with lettuce, tomato, pickles, and mayo) isn’t universally understood, nor is the phrase “to pass a good time” (instead of “to have” a good time).

After surveying 2000 people (with proportional numbers from each state), PlayNJ created a map showing the top slang word in each state. Many are words that are unlikely to be understood beyond state lines, but others—like California’s bomb (something you really like) and New York’s deadass (to be completely serious)—have spread well beyond their respective borders thanks to memes and internet culture.

Hawaiians are also known for their distinctive slang words, with 71 percent reporting that words like shaka (hello) and poho (waste of time) are frequently misunderstood. Shark bait, one of the state’s more colorful terms, refers to tourists who are so pale that they attract sharks.

Check out the full list below and test your knowledge of regional slang words with PlayNJ’s online quiz.

A chart showing the top slang words in each state
PlayNJ
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Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment, Inc. and Legendary Pictures Productions, LLC.
What Would It Cost to Operate a Real Jurassic Park?
Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment, Inc. and Legendary Pictures Productions, LLC.
Universal Studios and Amblin Entertainment, Inc. and Legendary Pictures Productions, LLC.

As the Jurassic Park franchise has demonstrated, trapping prehistoric monsters on an island with bite-sized tourists may not be the smartest idea (record-breaking box office numbers aside). On top of the safety concerns, the cost of running a Jurassic Park would raise its own set of pretty pricey issues. Energy supplier E.ON recently collaborated with physicists from Imperial College London to calculate how much energy the fictional attraction would eat up in the real world.

The infographic below borrows elements that appear in both the Jurassic Park and Jurassic World films. One of the most costly features in the park would be the aquarium for holding the massive marine reptiles. To keep the water heated and hospitable year-round, the park would need to pay an energy bill of close to $3 million a year.

Maintaining a pterosaur aviary would be an even more expensive endeavor. To come up with this cost, the researchers looked at the yearly amount of energy consumed by the Eden Project, a massive biome complex in the UK. Using that data, they concluded that a structure built to hold winged creatures bigger than any bird alive today would add up to $6.6 million a year in energy costs.

Other facilities they envisioned for the island include an egg incubator, embryo fridge, hotel, and emergency bunker. And of course, there would be electric fences running 24/7 to keep the genetic attractions separated from park guests. In total, the physicists estimated that the park would use 455 million kilowatt hours a year, or the equivalent of 30,000 average homes. That annual energy bill comes out to roughly $63 million.

Keep in mind that energy would still only make up one part of Jurassic Park's hypothetical budget—factoring in money for lawsuits would be a whole different story.

Map of dinosaur park.
E.ON

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