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10 Ways to Get Your Caffeine Fix Without Coffee

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iStock / Rebecca O'Connell

Looking to get an extra buzz without drinking another cup of coffee? Luckily, sleepy people everywhere have created a huge market for all things caffeine-related. Here are some more unusual products that will give you a buzz.

1. BRACELET; $40

These bracelets administer caffeine right through your skin. They're lined with energy patches that provide the same amount of caffeine as a medium cup of coffee, but over the course of four hours to prevent jitters or crashing. Because the caffeine isn't going through your digestive system, the effects are also stronger and hit faster. Each bracelet comes with 30 patches to get you started.

Find it: IndieGoGo

2. MINTS; $19

Worried about getting coffee breath? These mints will make your mouth minty fresh while giving you a pep in your step. Each mint has 40 milligrams of caffeine so eating two mints is about the same as a cup of coffee. The mints are "wintergreen flavor with a touch of menthol for a strong kick."

Find it: Amazon

3. SOAP; $7

Showers are about to get a lot more energizing—no freezing cold water needed. This vegetable-based glycerine soap is made with caffeine to give you a morning jumpstart, even before your first cup of coffee. Each bar has about 200 milligrams of caffeine per serving/shower. It also has a refreshing peppermint smell—but no, it's not edible.

Find it: ThinkGeek

4. STIR STICKS; $13

Now you can add caffeine to any beverage you like with a stick that you can swirl into your cup. Each plastic stick is filled with crystals that dissolve in your drink after just 10 seconds of stirring and packs 125 milligrams of caffeine. You can opt for the plain version or try flavors like orange, mixed berry, and lemon lime.

Find it: Amazon

5. SHAMPOO; $6

Energize your scalp with caffeine-infused shampoo. While this shower addition might not actually wake you up, studies have shown that caffeine might slightly help with hair loss. OGX claims their shampoo helps thicken hair and keep it on your head.

Find it: Walmart

6. TOOTHPASTE; $15

Say goodbye to groggily brushing your teeth. Power Toothpaste is infused with caffeine that quickly kicks in as soon as you're done with your oral hygiene routine. Each tube has enough mint-flavored paste for 90 brushes with 80 milligrams of caffeine.

Find it: Power Toothpaste

7. WATER; $20

Swap out your coffee for something a little more refreshing. This hydrating water bottle comes with electrolytes and 60 milligrams of caffeine without the bitter aftertaste.

Find it: Amazon

8. GUM; $19

Based on the popular soda, the gum comes packed with guarana, ginseng, and the same amount of caffeine as an energy drink to deliver a minty kick that's sure to keep you up for a while.

Find it: Amazon

9. HOT SAUCE; $7

Speaking of kicks, Double Kick hot sauce is sure to wake up your taste buds. Both the hot taste and 12 milligrams of caffeine per serving will jerk you awake.

Find it: Double Kick

10. FACE WIPES; $15

Start the morning right with a clean and refreshed face. These caffeine matcha wipes remove dirt, soothe with aloe, and wake you up with caffeine. Each pack comes with 25 wipes that are good for all skin types.

Find it: Sephora

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Starbucks
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Food
It’s Still Summer, But Pumpkin Spice Lattes Are Already Here
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Starbucks

It’s August, so go ahead and gird yourself for pumpkin season. Yes, that tell-tale sign of impending autumn, the Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte, is about to come back, according to Fortune. The company hasn't released a specific launch date, but it just announced that a new bottled version of the latte will be coming to grocery stores this month, along with pumpkin spice ground coffee.

Last year, the PSL arrived in Starbucks stores on September 1; the year before, it was September 8. There's no denying that the coffee chain is forcing its fall favorites on us earlier and earlier. Early enough to make us consider getting that Pumpkin Spice over ice, in fact.

The much-derided orange beverage is just the most famous example of a marketing trend that spreads far beyond coffee. As early as late July, pumpkin-flavored snacks, cookies, cereals, and other foods you wouldn’t think should taste like pumpkin start hitting stores, giving the people what they really want: to pretend they’re cozying up in a scarf on a rainy fall day instead of sitting in front of their air conditioners in their underwear.

Why does Starbucks keep pushing the starting line of the fall season closer and closer to mid-summer? Dollar bills, obviously. In the first decade after the drink’s launch in 2003, the company sold around 200 million Pumpkin Spice Lattes. In 2015, Forbes estimated that it would make $100 million from the PSL that fall alone. Despite the online hate, a huge chunk of people loooove their PSLs.

These days, it’s not fall until someone starts hating on the Pumpkin Spice Latte. Besides, climate change will eventually render seasons moot, right?

[h/t Fortune]

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Health
Attention Moscow Mule Fans: Those Copper Mugs May Pose a Serious Health Threat
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iStock

Even if you can’t list the ingredients in a Moscow Mule, you may be able to recognize one from across a bar: The simple combination of vodka, lime juice, and ginger beer is traditionally served in a copper mug. But that trendy vessel could pose a serious health threat, according to public health officials. As CBS News reports, the potential for food poisoning from those iconic cups is severe enough that the state of Iowa is taking a stand against them.

Copper is commonly used to make kitchenware like pots and pans, but when it comes into contact with certain foods, it can be unsafe. Foods and liquids that have a pH lower than 6.0, and are therefore acidic, can erode the copper and copper alloys and cause them to mix with whatever’s being consumed. The pH of lime juice falls between 2.0 and 2.35 [PDF], so the chances of copper contamination from a Moscow Mule sloshing inside a copper mug all night are high.

Symptoms of copper poisoning include vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and yellow skin or jaundice. Even if you feel fine after a night of Moscow Mule imbibing, long-term effects like liver damage can occur over time. In response to these hazards, Iowa’s Alcoholic Beverages Division released a statement [PDF] advising against the use of Moscow Mule mugs. “The recent popularity of Moscow Mules, an alcoholic cocktail typically served in a copper mug, has led to inquiries regarding the safe use of copper mugs and this beverage,” it reads. “The use of copper and copper alloys as a food contact surface is limited in Iowa.”

If you’re hesitant to put your Moscow Mule obsession to bed, there are ways to enjoy the drink safely without sacrificing the classic look. When stocking your bar at home, make sure to include copper mugs lined with food-safe metal like nickel or stainless steel. And when you’re ordering the drink elsewhere, you can check with the bartender to see if they have similar containers. If not, asking for the drink in a boring old glass is your safest bet.

[h/t CBS News]

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