iStock / Rebecca O'Connell
iStock / Rebecca O'Connell

10 Ways to Get Your Caffeine Fix Without Coffee

iStock / Rebecca O'Connell
iStock / Rebecca O'Connell

Looking to get an extra buzz without drinking another cup of coffee? Luckily, sleepy people everywhere have created a huge market for all things caffeine-related. Here are some more unusual products that will give you a buzz.

1. BRACELET; $40

These bracelets administer caffeine right through your skin. They're lined with energy patches that provide the same amount of caffeine as a medium cup of coffee, but over the course of four hours to prevent jitters or crashing. Because the caffeine isn't going through your digestive system, the effects are also stronger and hit faster. Each bracelet comes with 30 patches to get you started.

Find it: IndieGoGo

2. MINTS; $19

Worried about getting coffee breath? These mints will make your mouth minty fresh while giving you a pep in your step. Each mint has 40 milligrams of caffeine so eating two mints is about the same as a cup of coffee. The mints are "wintergreen flavor with a touch of menthol for a strong kick."

Find it: Amazon

3. SOAP; $7

Showers are about to get a lot more energizing—no freezing cold water needed. This vegetable-based glycerine soap is made with caffeine to give you a morning jumpstart, even before your first cup of coffee. Each bar has about 200 milligrams of caffeine per serving/shower. It also has a refreshing peppermint smell—but no, it's not edible.

Find it: ThinkGeek

4. STIR STICKS; $13

Now you can add caffeine to any beverage you like with a stick that you can swirl into your cup. Each plastic stick is filled with crystals that dissolve in your drink after just 10 seconds of stirring and packs 125 milligrams of caffeine. You can opt for the plain version or try flavors like orange, mixed berry, and lemon lime.

Find it: Amazon

5. SHAMPOO; $6

Energize your scalp with caffeine-infused shampoo. While this shower addition might not actually wake you up, studies have shown that caffeine might slightly help with hair loss. OGX claims their shampoo helps thicken hair and keep it on your head.

Find it: Walmart

6. TOOTHPASTE; $15

Say goodbye to groggily brushing your teeth. Power Toothpaste is infused with caffeine that quickly kicks in as soon as you're done with your oral hygiene routine. Each tube has enough mint-flavored paste for 90 brushes with 80 milligrams of caffeine.

Find it: Power Toothpaste

7. WATER; $20

Swap out your coffee for something a little more refreshing. This hydrating water bottle comes with electrolytes and 60 milligrams of caffeine without the bitter aftertaste.

Find it: Amazon

8. GUM; $19

Based on the popular soda, the gum comes packed with guarana, ginseng, and the same amount of caffeine as an energy drink to deliver a minty kick that's sure to keep you up for a while.

Find it: Amazon

9. HOT SAUCE; $7

Speaking of kicks, Double Kick hot sauce is sure to wake up your taste buds. Both the hot taste and 12 milligrams of caffeine per serving will jerk you awake.

Find it: Double Kick

10. FACE WIPES; $15

Start the morning right with a clean and refreshed face. These caffeine matcha wipes remove dirt, soothe with aloe, and wake you up with caffeine. Each pack comes with 25 wipes that are good for all skin types.

Find it: Sephora

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Sorry, Kids: Soda is Now Banned From Children's Menus in Baltimore
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iStock

The war on sugary drinks continues. Following several cities that have passed laws allowing them to collect substantial sales tax on sodas and other sweetened beverages, Baltimore is taking things a step further. A new ordinance that went into effect Wednesday will prohibit restaurants from offering soda on their kids’ menus.

Leana Wen, the city’s health commissioner, told the Associated Press that the ordinance was enacted to “help families make the healthy choice the easy choice.” Instead of soda, eateries will be expected to offer milk, water, and 100 percent fruit juices.

If you’re wondering what will stop children from sipping soda ordered by an adult escort, the answer is—nothing. Business owners will not be expected to swat Pepsi out of a child’s hand. The effort is intended to get both parents and children thinking about healthier alternatives to sodas, which children consume with regularity. A 2017 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study found that 30 percent of kids aged 2 to 19 consumed two or more servings a day, which can contribute to type 2 diabetes, obesity, cavities, and other adverse effects.

Businesses in violation of this kid-targeted soda prohibition will be fined $100. Baltimore joins seven cities in California and Lafayette, Colorado, which have similar laws on the books.

[h/t The Baltimore Sun]

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iStock
'Lime Disease' Could Give You a Nasty Rash This Summer
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iStock

A cold Corona or virgin margarita is best enjoyed by the pool, but watch where you’re squeezing those limes. As Slate illustrates in a new video, there’s a lesser-known “lime disease,” and it can give you a nasty skin rash if you’re not careful.

When lime juice comes into contact with your skin and is then exposed to UV rays, it can cause a chemical reaction that results in phytophotodermatitis. It looks a little like a poison ivy reaction or sun poisoning, and some of the symptoms include redness, blistering, and inflammation. It’s the same reaction caused by a corrosive sap on the giant hogweed, an invasive weed that’s spreading throughout the U.S.

"Lime disease" may sound random, but it’s a lot more common than you might think. Dermatologist Barry D. Goldman tells Slate he sees cases of the skin condition almost daily in the summer. Some people have even reported receiving second-degree burns as a result of the citric acid from lime juice. According to the Mayo Clinic, the chemical that causes phytophotodermatitis can also be found in wild parsnip, wild dill, wild parsley, buttercups, and other citrus fruits.

To play it safe, keep your limes confined to the great indoors or wash your hands with soap after handling the fruit. You can learn more about phytophotodermatitis by checking out Slate’s video below.

[h/t Slate]

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