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An artist's rendering of the Europa mission's spacecraft. Main Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Banner Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech
An artist's rendering of the Europa mission's spacecraft. Main Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Banner Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

How Will the Europa Lander Search for Life?

An artist's rendering of the Europa mission's spacecraft. Main Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Banner Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech
An artist's rendering of the Europa mission's spacecraft. Main Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech Banner Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Water, chemistry, energy: three key components for life. We only have confirmation of life on Earth so far, but we're always looking elsewhere. One of the biggest targets in the solar system is Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. We're aiming for that target with the Europa lander, which will launch for the Jovian moon around 2024. The mission will be the first on-site search for evidence of life on another world since Viking 1 and Viking 2 landed on Mars in 1976.

Last month, the team behind the Europa Lander released the mission’s scientific objectives [PDF], and at the recent 48th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in The Woodlands, Texas, scientists answered questions and led a discussion about the trip with the wider planetary science community.

They explained that the Europa lander is not like the spacecraft Cassini or the Mars rovers—expeditions with big initial objectives, but quiet hope for decades of continued operation and science experiments. In contrast, this mission will live hard and die young. It will have to: The radiation environment at Europa is punishing, so the communications relay orbiter that will act as go-between for the lander and Earth won’t last more than a month or two. The lander will have enough power to run for just 20 days on the surface and will run on batteries; nuclear power was considered but discarded as being too expensive and challenging to launch. Batteries also have the advantage of being “quieter,” providing less vibration, magnetic, and electromagnetic disruption to sensitive instruments.

The lander will launch on a Space Launch System rocket and will spend years traveling to Europa. Upon arrival, the relay orbiter―which during the cruise phase to Jupiter acts as a carrier―will release the lander to Europa’s surface. As the communications satellite establishes its Europan orbit, the lander will use a mini sky crane system to land, looking and acting much like the rover Curiosity on Mars.

But notably, the scientists don’t call this process “Entry, Descent, and Landing” (EDL), but rather DDL, for Deorbit, Descent, and Landing—there’s no atmosphere around Europa for a lander to “enter.” This makes the job of landing much easier than on Mars, whose tenuous atmosphere is insufficient for parachutes alone, and yet enough that it makes a pure supersonic retropropulsive landing a challenge.

WHAT’S ON THE LANDER?

This artist's rendering illustrates a conceptual design for a potential future mission to land a robotic probe on the surface of Europa. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The lander is a square about the size of a large riding lawnmower with four long, articulated cricket-like legs that will each compress independently on landing, allowing it to touch down on an uncertain or jagged surface and still remain level. (If it landed on a ledge, for example, one leg might remain fully extended along the drop, and three legs might compress fully, bringing the belly of the robot even and near the ground.) A communications antenna will then deploy and establish communications with the relay orbiter.

The lander will host a payload of science instruments weighing nearly 94 pounds. “That is a considerable mass for getting science done on any world,” Kevin Hand of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, co-chair of the science definition team, said. To get the science done, the lander will carry five instruments: a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer, which can identify the contents of a sample; a context camera, which should return some spectacular images, including a giant Jupiter hanging in the black sky over the ice world; and a geophone, used for seismometry, the study of seismic activity. Except for the camera, these instruments will live inside of the lander, which will protect them from the worst of the radiation.

The most crucial tool for gathering material is a sample collection arm: essentially an angled, twin-bladed boring instrument that will carve strips of granite-hard Europan surface at a depth of 4 inches or deeper. (Regolith at such a depth is not radiation-processed, increasing the likelihood of observing indicators of life.) The collected material will be loaded into a dock in the lander’s side, and the instruments within will begin their analyses. Over the course of the mission, the lander will collect and analyze a minimum of five samples with a minimum volume of .4 cubic inches from five different regions within the lander “workspace”―that is, the radial reach of the collector arm.

WHAT WILL WORKING ON EUROPA BE LIKE?

Two views of the trailing hemisphere of the ice-covered Europa. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/DLR

An Earth day is called a “day.” A Mars day is called a “sol.” A Europan day is called a “tal.” The carrier relay will orbit Europa every 24 hours―this is a happy coincidence with Earth, but wasn’t planned that way―and return three to four gigabits of data per orbit. Mission operations are therefore planned in 24-hour intervals.

At the start of a tal―00:00—the carrier relay will receive its commands from Earth to determine that period’s working schedule. The lander receives those instructions at 01:00, when the carrier is in view of the lander in its orbit. On an ordinary tal, the lander will start collecting samples for the next five hours. At 06:00, the lander will upload engineering data to the relay, which will, in turn, send that data to Earth.

The lander will then get to work on sample analysis, and at 11:00, upload its findings, and go to sleep. At this point, the carrier relay orbiter will be out of range of the lander. Two hours later, it will have a clear shot at Earth, and will send the data back here for analysis. Humans will use this data to plan the science and engineering for the next day, and will generate commands to that effect. At 23:00, those commands and instructions will be sent to the relay orbiter, and the cycle will repeat itself.

The baseline science mission will be achieved in 10 days. Depending on what the lander finds, the team might decide to prioritize different things—for example, focusing on collecting samples or image acquisition.

HOW WILL IT FIND LIFE?

Reddish spots and shallow pits pepper the ridged surface of Europa. Image Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/University of Colorado

There is no such thing as a “life detector.” Instead of a single magic reading, the lander will look for many organic biosignatures that, taken together, reveal life. Instruments will look for signs and abundance of organic material, cell-like structures, chirality (molecular properties, like those found in amino acids), and biominerals (minerals produced by living things)—among many other things.

Individually, none of these biosignatures can reveal life, but if found collectively, the evidence will be all but irrefutable. A biosignature matrix of positive and negative results is, in essence, plotted on a spreadsheet. Hand called this “biosignature bingo.” Not all of the biosignatures are necessary, but some combination of them are; finding, for example, an abundance of organics, cell patterns, chirality, and microscopic evidence but no signs of biominerals would still conclude life with certainty. On the other hand, if none of these features were found but biominerals and cell patterns were, we wouldn't call that evidence of life.

Sampling will be done in triplicate to confirm life findings. Three samples will have to confirm the biosignatures. The lander team is confident about this process. “It would be very hard to have a false positive, especially after replicating it three times,” Hand told mental_floss. “We use life on Earth as a guide, and so applying that matrix to life on Earth, both past and present, we would have a hard time leading to a false positive.”

The lander, of course, will not be the first spacecraft to arrive at the Jovian moon. The Europa Clipper spacecraft will have arrived and studied Europa years earlier, and will have ably characterized the habitability of that world. What Clipper finds, Lander will build upon. The Clipper’s work will determine one of four possible outcomes: Europa is not habitable, in which case the lander will figure out why (for example: geological activity); Europa is maybe habitable, in which case the lander will resolve the ambiguity of the finding; Europa is habitable, in which case the lander will try to find life; and Europa is inhabited―Clipper outright finds life on Europa, in which case the lander will confirm the finding and set the stage for future exploration. In addition, Clipper will act as a backup plan for the lander should the relay orbiter fail. The lander can talk to Clipper, which will in turn send the information back to Earth.

Despite the recent White House budget request that notably failed to earmark money for the Europa lander, these missions are realistically in no danger. Congressional appropriators have made it clear that the Europa lander is going to happen, and, just as in the case of Clipper (which the Office of Management and Budget ignored for years), it is still expected to receive billions of dollars over the next decade.

HOW DOES THIS COMPARE TO VIKING?

Images from the Viking mission on Mars. Image Credit: NASA

NASA undertook its last true life-finding mission—Viking’s mission to Mars—decades ago. There’s a reason for this time gap: Viking didn’t find life. Scientists had previously held out hope that animals might be scurrying about on the Martian surface. When the red planet was found to be creature-less, interest was quickly lost in the Mars program. Viking is thus sometimes criticized as being a failure. But Hand disagreed. “Viking is vindicated by Europa,” he said. “If Pathfinder had gone back and found a golf course on Mars, someone could say Viking made mistakes. Viking worked beautifully. Mars did not cooperate. Life detection experiments should provide valuable information, regardless of the biology results.”

Even in the absence of life, scientists will learn a lot about Europa as an ocean world, and as a world with liquid water recycling through the sea floor. In the absence of biology, they will still advance the sciences of geochemistry and oceanography.

“As exciting as a positive result for biosignatures would be, a negative result is equally profound. It gets to the question of what does it take for the origin of life to occur,” Hand said. Today, for example, hydrothermal vents are thought to have been critical to the birth of life on Earth. If Europa—which also has hydrothermal vents—is dead, perhaps hydrothermal vents are not that important after all.

Science has marched rapidly since the Viking missions, which means if life exists on Europa, we’re more likely to find it now than Viking scientists on Mars were. When the Viking landers set down in the mid-1970s, the structure of DNA had only been known for about 20 years. In the years since Viking, hydrothermal vents were discovered on Earth, and a whole new domain of life was discovered in the microbial realm, like cryptoendoliths in Antarctica—not to mention the “polymerase chain reaction” was developed, allowing the human genome to be sequenced. Last year, a new tree of life was created based on this research. So going into the lander mission, Hand and his team are cautiously optimistic.

“We don’t know if biology works beyond Earth,” Hand said. “We have every reason to believe it should and could, but we have yet to do that experiment.” The Europa lander team hopes to change that.

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10 Astonishing Things You Should Know About the Milky Way
Anne Dirkse, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0
Anne Dirkse, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Our little star and the tiny planets that circle it are part of a galaxy called the Milky Way. Its name comes from the Greek galaxias kyklos ("milky circle") and Latin via lactea ("milky road"). Find a remote area in a national park, miles from the nearest street light, and you'll see exactly why the name makes sense and what all the fuss is about. Above is not a sky of black, but a luminous sea of whites, blues, greens, and tans. Here are a few things you might not know about our spiraling home in the universe.

1. THE MILKY WAY IS GIGANTIC.

The Milky Way galaxy is about 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 kilometers (about 621,371,000,000,000,000 miles) across. Even traveling at the speed of light, it would still take you well over 100,000 years to go from one end of the galaxy to the other. So it's big. Not quite as big as space itself, which is "vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big," as Douglas Adams wrote, but respectably large. And that's just one galaxy. Consider how many galaxies there are in the universe: One recent estimate says 2 trillion.

2. IT'S JAM-PACKED WITH CELESTIAL STUFF.

artist's illustration of the milky way galaxy and its center
An artist's concept of the Milky Way and the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* at its core.
ESA–C. Carreau

The Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy composed of an estimated 300 billion stars, along with dust, gas, and celestial phenomena such as nebulae, all of which orbits around a hub of sorts called the Galactic Center, with a supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A* (pronounced "A-star") at its core. The bar refers to the characteristic arrangement of stars at the interior of the galaxy, with interstellar gas essentially being channeled inward to feed an interstellar nursery. There are four spiral arms of the galaxy, with the Sun residing on the inner part of a minor arm called Orion. We're located in the boondocks of the Milky Way, but that is OK. There is definitely life here, but everywhere else is a question mark. For all we know, this might be the galactic Paris.

3. FOR A SPIRAL GALAXY, IT'S PRETTY TYPICAL …

If you looked at all the spiral galaxies in the local volume of the universe, the Milky Way wouldn't stand out as being much different than any other. "As galaxies go, the Milky Way is pretty ordinary for its type," Steve Majewski, a professor of astronomy at the University of Virginia and the principal investigator on the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), tells Mental Floss. "It's got a pretty regular form. It's got its usual complement of star clusters around it. It's got a supermassive black hole in the center, which most galaxies seem to indicate they have. From that point of view, the Milky Way is a pretty run-of-the-mill spiral galaxy."

4. …AND YET IT STANDS OUT AMONG ALL GALAXIES.

On the other hand, he tells Mental Floss, spiral galaxies in general tend to be larger than most other types of galaxies. "If you did a census of all the galaxies in the universe, the Milky Way would seem rather unusual because it is very big, our type being one of the biggest kinds of galaxies that there are in the universe." From a human perspective, the most important thing about the Milky Way is that it definitely managed to produce life. If they exist, the creatures in Andromeda, the galaxy next door (see #9), probably feel the same way about their own.

5. FIGURING OUT ITS STRUCTURE IS LIKE MARCHING IN A HALFTIME SHOW.


John McSporran, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

We have a very close-up view of the phenomena and forces at work in the Milky Way because we live inside of it, but that internal perspective places astronomers at a disadvantage when it comes to determining a galactic pattern. "We have a nice view of the Andromeda galaxy because we can see the whole thing laid out in front of us," says Majewski. "We don't have that opportunity in the Milky Way."

To figure out its structure, astronomers have to think like band members during a football halftime show. Though spectators in the stands can easily see the letters and shapes being made on the field by the marchers, the band can't see the shapes they are making. Rather, they can only work together in some coordinated way, moving to make these patterns and motions on the field. So it is with telescopes and stars.

6. WHEN DUST GETS IN OUR EYES, IT'S HARD TO SEE FAR.

Interstellar dust further stymies astronomers. "That dust blocks our light, our view of the more distant parts of the Milky Way," Majewski says. "There are areas of the galaxy that are relatively obscured from view because they are behind huge columns of dust that we can't see through in the optical wavelengths that our eyes work in." To ameliorate this problem, astronomers sometimes work in longer wavelengths such as radio or infrared, which lessen the effects of the dust.

7. THE MILKY WAY SPINS, BUT ITS SPEED DOESN'T ADD UP …

Astronomers can make pretty reasonable estimates of the mass of the galaxy by the amount of light they can see. They can count the galaxy's stars and calculate how much those stars should weigh. They can account for all the dust in the galaxy and all of the gas. And when they tally the mass of everything they can see, they find that it is far short of what is needed to account for the gravity that causes the Milky Way to spin.

In short, our Sun is about two-thirds of the way from the center of the galaxy, and astronomers know that it goes around the galaxy at about 144 miles per second. "If you calculate it based on the amount of matter interior to the orbit of the Sun, how fast we should be going around, the number you should get is around 150 or 160 kilometers [93–99 miles] per second," says Majewski. "Further out, the stars are rotating even faster than they should if you just account for what we call luminous matter. Clearly there is some other substance in the Milky Way exerting a gravitational effect. We call it dark matter."

8. … AND WE BLAME DARK MATTER FOR THAT.

Dark matter is a big problem in galactic studies. "In the Milky Way, we study it by looking at the orbits of stars and star clusters and satellite galaxies, and then trying to figure out how much mass do we need interior to the orbit of that thing to get it moving at the speed that we can measure," Majewski says. "And so by doing this kind of analysis for objects at different radii across the galaxy, we actually have a fairly good idea of the distribution of the dark matter in the Milky Way—and yet we still have no idea what the dark matter is."

9. THE MILKY WAY IS ON A COLLISION COURSE WITH ANDROMEDA. BUT DON'T PANIC.

andromeda galaxy
The Andromeda galaxy
ESA/Hubble & NASA

Sometime in the next 4 or 5 billion years, the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies will smash into each other. The two galaxies are about the same size and have about the same number of stars, but there is no cause for alarm. "Even though there are 300 billion stars in our galaxy and a comparable number, or maybe more, in Andromeda, when they collide together, not a single star is expected to hit another star. The space between stars is that vast," says Majewski.

10. WE'RE THROWING EVERYTHING WE HAVE AT STUDYING IT.

There are countless spacecraft and telescopes studying the Milky Way. Most famous is the Hubble Space Telescope, while other space telescopes such as Chandra, Spitzer, and Kepler are also returning data to help astronomers unlock the mysteries of our swirling patch of stars. The next landmark telescope in development is NASA's James Webb Space Telescope. It should finally launch in 2019. Meanwhile, such ambitious projects as APOGEE are working out the structure and evolution of our spiral home by doing "galactic archaeology." APOGEE is a survey of the Milky Way using spectroscopy, measuring the chemical compositions of hundreds of thousands of stars across the galaxy in great detail. The properties of stars around us are fossil evidence of their formation, which, when combined with their ages, helps astronomers understand the timeline and evolution of the galaxy we call home. 

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Mysterious 'Hypatia Stone' Is Like Nothing Else in Our Solar System
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In 1996, Egyptian geologist Aly Barakat discovered a tiny, one-ounce stone in the eastern Sahara. Ever since, scientists have been trying to figure out where exactly the mysterious pebble originated. As Popular Mechanics reports, it probably wasn't anywhere near Earth. A new study in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta finds that the micro-compounds in the rock don't match anything we've ever found in our solar system.

Scientists have known for several years that the fragment, known as the Hypatia stone, was extraterrestrial in origin. But this new study finds that it's even weirder than we thought. Led by University of Johannesburg geologists, the research team performed mineral analyses on the microdiamond-studded rock that showed that it is made of matter that predates the existence of our Sun or any of the planets in the solar system. And, its chemical composition doesn't resemble anything we've found on Earth or in comets or meteorites we have studied.

Lead researcher Jan Kramers told Popular Mechanics that the rock was likely created in the early solar nebula, a giant cloud of homogenous interstellar dust from which the Sun and its planets formed. While some of the basic materials in the pebble are found on Earth—carbon, aluminum, iron, silicon—they exist in wildly different ratios than materials we've seen before. Researchers believe the rock's microscopic diamonds were created by the shock of the impact with Earth's atmosphere or crust.

"When Hypatia was first found to be extraterrestrial, it was a sensation, but these latest results are opening up even bigger questions about its origins," as study co-author Marco Andreoli said in a press release.

The study suggests the early solar nebula may not have been as homogenous as we thought. "If Hypatia itself is not presolar, [some of its chemical] features indicate that the solar nebula wasn't the same kind of dust everywhere—which starts tugging at the generally accepted view of the formation of our solar system," Kramer said.

The researchers plan to further probe the rock's origins, hopefully solving some of the puzzles this study has presented.

[h/t Popular Mechanics]

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