Cyclone Debbie Made Landfall in Australia

Cyclone Debbie approaching landfall in northeastern Australia on March 28, 2017. Image Credit: SSEC/Google Earth

 
A powerful cyclone came ashore on Australia’s northeastern coast on Tuesday, the most intense storm to strike the country in several years. Cyclone Debbie made landfall on the Queensland coast south of the town of Bowen, which lies about 300 miles southeast of Cairns. The storm hit land with winds in excess of 120 mph, which would make it the equivalent of a major hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale used in the United States. Debbie stands out as an intense storm in an unusually quiet cyclone season in this part of the world. A storm of this magnitude hasn’t struck the country since Cyclone Yasi made landfall south of Cairns in February 2011.

Cyclone Debbie made landfall in an area that’s home to nearly 100,000 people, including the towns of Mackay and Bowen. Media reports indicate that local emergency response crews were worried that the town of Bowen, which found itself in the cyclone’s eyewall, would sustain substantial damage from the storm, as many of the town’s homes and businesses were built before more stringent construction standards were introduced in the 1980s [PDF]. The town of Mackay and its suburbs saw less intense winds from the cyclone, but residents along the coast were ordered to evacuate in anticipation of a dangerous storm surge.

Early reports of damage are few and far between, due to power and communications outages with the hardest-hit areas. Videos published online by storm chasers in the area show damage to trees and buildings as the storm came ashore.

An infrared satellite image of Cyclone Debbie on March 28, 2017. Warmer colors indicate higher cloud tops, associated with intense convection in the cyclone. Image Credit: SSEC

 
Cyclone Debbie formed under ideal conditions that allowed the storm to thrive. Sea surface temperatures off the northeastern Australian coast were around 80°F, there was ample tropical moisture to feed the storm, and the cyclone encountered almost no wind shear in the upper levels of the atmosphere to disrupt its development. The storm took advantage of the favorable conditions and underwent rapid intensification as it neared the Australian coast early on Tuesday morning local time. WeatherBELL’s Ryan Maue reported that satellite estimates pegged the cyclone’s peak winds at more than 140 mph at the storm’s strongest point. The storm weakened somewhat as it approached the coast due to an eyewall replacement cycle, a common process in strong tropical cyclones in which a new eyewall develops and chokes off the old eyewall, temporarily weakening the storm until the process is completed.

Tropical cyclones in the southwestern Pacific Ocean are most common between the months of November and April, though cyclones are possible at any point in the year. The peak of the season coincides with the heat of the summer toward the beginning of the year. Australia’s northern coast is vulnerable to major tropical cyclones. The last significant cyclone to strike this region of Queensland was Cyclone Marcia in 2015; the storm caused significant damage but thankfully resulted in no fatalities. Debbie threatens to be the strongest storm to make landfall since Yasi back in February 2011. Cyclone Yasi reached shore with winds of 155 mph, causing billions of dollars in damage.

The term “tropical cyclone” applies to any low-pressure system that develops over the ocean and feeds its energy off of thunderstorms near the center of the system rather than winds high in the atmosphere. Strong tropical cyclones are called “hurricanes” in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific Ocean, “typhoons” in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and simply “cyclones” everywhere else in the world, including around Australia. All of the storms are structurally the same—the only difference is that they’re classified a little differently based on wind speeds.

What Is a Bomb Cyclone?

Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The phrase bomb cyclone has re-entered the news this week as parts of the central U.S. face severe weather. Mountain and Midwestern states, including Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, and South Dakota, all fall in the path of a winter storm expected to deliver tornadoes, hail, heavy snow, flooding, and hurricane-force winds on Wednesday, March 13 into Thursday. It seems appropriate for a storm that strong to have bomb in its name, but the word actually refers to a meteorological phenomenon and not the cyclone's explosive intensity.

According to The Denver Post, the bomb in bomb cyclone stands for bombogenesis. Bombogenesis occurs when a non-tropical storm experiences at least a 24 millibar (the unit used to measure barometric pressure) drop within 24 hours. Low pressure makes for intense storms, so a bomb cyclone is a system that's built up a significant amount strength in a short length of time.

This type of storm usually depends on the ocean or another large body of water for its power. During the winter, the relatively warm air coming off the ocean and the cold air above land can collide to create a sharp drop in atmospheric pressure. Also known as a winter hurricane, this effect has produced some of the worst snowstorms to ever hit the U.S.

The fact that this latest bomb cyclone has formed nowhere near the coast makes it even more remarkable. Rather, a warm, subtropical air mass and a cold, Arctic air mass crossed paths, creating the perfect conditions for a rare bombogenesis over the Rockies and Great Plains states.

Central U.S. residents in the bomb cyclone's path have taken great precautions ahead of the storm. Over 1000 flights have been canceled for Wednesday and schools throughout Colorado have closed.

[h/t The Denver Post]

Watch a Rare ‘Ice Tsunami’ Slam Lake Erie

Clean Lakes Alliance, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Clean Lakes Alliance, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

A combination of freezing cold temperatures and high winds is creating an unusual phenomenon along Lake Erie. As KDKA reports, ice tsunamis are toppling onto lake shores, and many locals have been asked to stay inside and even evacuate their homes.

On February 24, 2019, the National Weather Service in Buffalo, New York issued a warning about dangerous wind gusts in the Lake Erie area. The service urged citizens to seek shelter indoors and avoid traveling if possible. Winds peaked at 74 mph earlier this week, the level of a Category 1 hurricane, and tore down trees and power lines throughout the region.

People who got close to Lake Erie during the windstorm witnessed a rare event known as an ice tsunami. When wind pushed ice on the lake's surface toward the retaining wall, the sheet broke apart and dumped massive ice chunks on the shore. The video below captures the phenomenon.

In some areas, the ice piles grew so large that roadways had to be closed. Residents of Hamburg, New York's Hoover Beach area were asked to voluntarily evacuate due to the encroaching ice.

Ice tsunamis, or ice shoves, are rare, but in some cases they can be life-threatening. In 2013, waves of ice shards from a Minnesota lake destroyed people's homes.

[h/t KDKA]

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