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Torment Your Friends With These 11 April Fools' Day Items

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ThinkGeek

April Fools' Day is every gullible person's least favorite holiday. Turn your friends into enemies with these devious items.

1. PHANTOM KEYSTROKER; $10

As if work days aren't hard enough, now your co-workers are going to have to deal with a faulty keyboard—or are they? This USB drive has an unassuming exterior, but it secretly messes with whatever computer it's plugged into. The dials and switches let you decide what new problems will appear: caps lock turning on and off, random mouse movements, strange words and phrases getting typed out, and more. Some things it won't do: Click the mouse button or hit delete.

Find it: ThinkGeek

2. SUBVERSIVE PEN SET; $7

These pens all come from fake, humorous locations like "Howie's House of Hair" and "Shecky the Clown." The businesses might not be real, but your victim's confusion will be.

Find it: Amazon

3. JOKE GOLF BALLS; $10

Lighten up a tense game of golf with a ball that explodes on impact. This four-pack includes the exploding ball, one that ejects a long ribbon, another that jumps when you try to putt it, and one that turns into a watery mist. (On second thought, this might make your fellow players even more frustrated.)

Find it: Spencer's

4. YETI MEAT; $10

Skip that can of Spam and grab a Himalayan delicacy—Yeti meat! Modeled like many other meat cans, this square tin is filled with the foot of the mythical beast that has been evading cryptozoologists for years. Full disclosure—the foot inside is plush, so make sure no one tries to actually eat it.

Find it: ThinkGeek

5. BEAN BOOZLED JELLY BEANS; $7

You know the frustration of trying to figure out if a jelly bean is cherry or cinnamon? That struggle is about to get way worse when you're trying to determine if a green bean is flavored like lime or lawn clippings. These Bean Boozled beans come with 10 "good" flavors and 10 "bad" flavors that match in color. It's up to chance whether the eater will get coconut or baby wipes.

Find it: Amazon

6. JALAPENO COTTON CANDY; $6

In the same vein as terrible tasting jelly beans, you can also surprise your friends with some unexpectedly spicy cotton candy. No one expects the fluffy sugar to have a bite, but this special batch is flavored with jalapeños. The 1-ounce tub offers plenty of hot cotton candy to enjoy once you get used to the unusual sweet and spicy taste.

Find it: Perpetual Kid

7. BABY BEER; $10-$12

This isn't really beer: The bottle is just for show and can hold any baby-friendly beverage you would like. The BPA free, 10 ounce bottle comes in two styles: Lil' Lager and Baby Cerveza. Just don't let them drink and drive their Cozy Coupe.

Find it: Amazon

8. UNENDING THANK YOU CARD; $10

The best way to say "I Love You" is with a card that never shuts up. This infuriating card plays annoying music non-stop, forcing the recipient to tear up the card. It's water-resistant and pushing the button only makes the music grow louder, so good luck.

Find it: ThinkGeek

9. MINOR MIRACLE MUG; $12

After enjoying a nice cup of coffee, drinkers will be surprised to find an image of the Virgin Mary at the bottom of their mug. Before he or she starts a bidding war on eBay, kindly let your victim know the porcelain mug is just a ruse.

Find it: Amazon

10. FROZEN SMILES; $7

This ice tray recreates frozen dentures that can bob in your water glass. The food-safe synthetic rubber tray makes two pairs of false teeth for double the trouble.

Find it: Amazon

11. FEISTY PETS; $20

You might want to think twice before giving one of these stuffed animals to a kid. The doe-eyed creatures look nice—until a squeeze of the noggin reveals them as blood-thirsty animals with sharp teeth. The scary animal line-up includes a cat, monkey, bear, dog, unicorn, guinea pig, polar bear, or lion.

Find it: Amazon

For more pranks, check out last year's list.

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10 Regional Twists on Trick-or-Treating
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iStock

Walk around any given American neighborhood on the night of October 31, and you’ll likely hear choruses of "trick-or-treat" chiming through the area. The sing-songy phrase is synonymous with Halloween in some parts of the world, but it's not the only way kids get sweets from their neighbors this time of year. From the Philippines to the American Midwest, here are some regional door-to-door traditions you may not have heard of.

1. PANGANGALULUWA // THE PHILIPPINES

Rice cakes wrapped in leaves.
Suman

The earliest form of trick-or-treating on Halloween can be traced back to Europe in the Middle Ages. Kids would don costumes and go door-to-door offering prayers for dead relatives in exchange for snacks called "soul cakes." When the cake was eaten, tradition held that a soul was ferried from purgatory into heaven. Souling has disappeared from Ireland and the UK, but a version of it lives on halfway across the world in the Philippines. During All Saints Day on November 1, Filipino children taking part in Pangangaluluwa will visit local houses and sing hymns for alms. The songs often relate to souls in purgatory, and carolers will play the part of the souls by asking for prayers. Kids are sometimes given rice cakes called suman, a callback to the soul cakes from centuries past.

2. PÃO-POR-DEUS // PORTUGAL

Raw dough.
iStock

Instead of trick-or-treating, kids in Portugal go door-to-door saying pão-por-deus ("bread for god") in exchange for goodies on All Saints Day. Some homeowners give out money or candy, while others offer actual baked goods.

3. HALLOWEEN APPLES // WESTERN CANADA

Kids trick-or-treating.
iStock

If they're not calling out "trick-or-treat" on their neighbors’ doorsteps on Halloween night, you may hear children in western Canada saying "Halloween apples!" The phrase is left over from a time when apples were a common Halloween treat and giving out loose items on the holiday wasn't considered taboo.

4. ST. MARTIN'S DAY // THE NETHERLANDS

The Dutch wait several days after Halloween to do their own take on trick-or-treating. On the night of November 11, St. Martin's Day, children in the Netherlands take to the streets with their homemade lanterns in hand. These lanterns were traditionally carved from beets or turnips, but today they’re most commonly made from paper. And the kids who partake don’t get away with shouting a few words at each home they visit—they’re expected to sing songs to receive their sugary rewards.

5. A PENNY FOR THE GUY // THE UK

Guy Fawkes Night celebration.

Peter Trimming, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

Guy Fawkes Night is seen by some as the English Protestants’ answer to the Catholic holidays associated with Halloween, so it makes sense that it has its own spin on trick-or-treating. November 5 marks the day of Guy Fawkes’s failed assassination attempt on King James as part of the Gunpowder Plot. To celebrate the occasion, children will tour the neighborhood asking for "a penny for the guy." Sometimes they’ll carry pictures of the would-be-assassin which are burned in the bonfires lit later at night.

6. TRICKS FOR TREATS // ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

Kids knocking on a door in costume.
iStock

If kids in the St. Louis area hope to go home with a full bag of candy on Halloween, they must be willing to tickle some funny bones. Saying "tricks-for-treats" followed by a joke replaces the classic trick-or-treat mantra in this Midwestern city. There’s no criteria for the quality or the subject of the joke, but spooky material (What’s a skeleton’s favorite instrument? The trombone!) earns brownie points.

7. ME DA PARA MI CALAVERITA // MEXICO

Sugar skulls with decoration.
iStock

While Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is completely separate from Halloween, the two holidays share a few things in common. Mexicans celebrate the day by dressing up, eating sweet treats, and in some parts of the country, going house-to-house. Children knocking on doors will say "me da para mi calaverita" or "give me money for my little skull," a reference to the decorated sugar skulls sold in markets at this time of year.

8. HALLOWEEN! // QUEBEC, CANADA

Kids dressed up for Halloween.
iStock

Trick-or-treaters like to keep things simple in the Canadian province of Quebec. In place of the alliterative exclamation, they shout “Halloween!” at each home they visit. Adults local to the area might remember saying "la charité s’il-vous-plaît "(French for “charity, please”) when going door-to-door on Halloween, but this saying has largely fallen out of fashion.

9. SWEET OR SOUR // GERMANY

Little girl trick-or-treating.
iStock

Halloween is only just beginning to gain popularity in Germany. Where it is celebrated, the holiday looks a lot like it does in America, but Germans have managed to inject some local character into their version of trick-or-treat. In exchange for candy, kids sometimes sing out "süß oder saures"—or "sweet and sour" in English.

10. TRIQUI, TRIQUI HALLOWEEN // COLOMBIA

Kids dressed up for Halloween.
Rubí Flórez, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Kids in Colombia anticipate dressing up and prowling the streets on Halloween just as much as kids do in the States. There are a few significant variations on the annual tradition: Instead of visiting private residencies, they're more likely to ask for candy from store owners and the security guards of apartment buildings. And instead of saying trick-or-treat, they recite this Spanish rhyme:

Triqui triqui Halloween
Quiero dulces para mí
Si no hay dulces para mí
Se le crece la naríz

In short, it means that if the grownups don't give the kids the candy they're asking for, their noses will grow. Tricky, tricky indeed

Original image
iStock
arrow
Lists
10 Regional Twists on Trick-or-Treating
Original image
iStock

Walk around any given American neighborhood on the night of October 31, and you’ll likely hear choruses of "trick-or-treat" chiming through the area. The sing-songy phrase is synonymous with Halloween in some parts of the world, but it's not the only way kids get sweets from their neighbors this time of year. From the Philippines to the American Midwest, here are some regional door-to-door traditions you may not have heard of.

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