CLOSE
ThinkGeek / Nintendo
ThinkGeek / Nintendo

Legend of Zelda-Themed Chess Is the Classiest Game in Hyrule

ThinkGeek / Nintendo
ThinkGeek / Nintendo

Fans of The Legend of Zelda series adore the games for their vibrant landscapes, puzzles, and of course, quirky cast of characters. Now you can find some of those iconic personalities in another game of strategy: chess.

This collector's chess set comes with 32 custom sculpted game pieces that look like characters from the series. On one side, you have the gold pieces, which are shaped like our heroes. There's Link as the king, Zelda as the queen, Impa as bishops, Epona as knights, Darunia as rooks, and Navi as pawns. On the black side, you can play as the villains: Ganon as the king, Twinrova as the queen, Iron Knuckles as bishops, Phantoms as knights, Armos as rooks, and Dekunuts as pawns.

Now you can defeat the evil lurking in Hyrule with a good strategy—no Master Sword needed.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Mantic Games, Kickstarter
arrow
entertainment
Hellboy Board Game Raises More Than $1 Million in Two Days on Kickstarter
Mantic Games, Kickstarter
Mantic Games, Kickstarter

When fans were asked to head to Kickstarter to help make a Hellboy board game a reality, they didn’t waste any time. Twenty minutes after the campaign launched on April 25, it had already reached its funding goal of $140,000. By May 1, the total was already past $1.2 million, with nearly 10,000 backers responding.

The game will be based on the Hellboy comic books by writer/artist Mike Mignola, who debuted the character in 1993 and has had a home at Dark Horse Comics ever since. The game lets you control one of four heroes from the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense (BPRD) including Hellboy, Abe Sapien, Liz Sherman, and Johann Kraus, as you “explore gothic locations, hunt down clues, discover artifacts, fight horrific creatures, and face off against terrifying bosses,” according to the Kickstarter page.

The game pits you against threats that could wipe out humanity, and it’s your job to gather enough information about them before Earth’s destruction. But there are choices to make along the way, according to Mantic Games on Kickstarter. “Do you spend valuable time investigating the scene to find a vital piece of the puzzle that could expose a crucial weakness of your foe, but risk the Impending Doom track reaching its devastating finale? Or do you forget the clues and rush through to a final confrontation before the monster has gathered its strength? No one said being a BPRD Agent would be easy.”

The game comes with PVC plastic models of classic Hellboy heroes and villains, as well as giant monsters like the Conqueror Worm. The Kickstarter exclusive box even features artwork by Mignola, along with power-up cards decorated with illustrations from the comics.

You can still back the project and help it move toward its remaining stretch goals, which would unlock better quality cards and a Right Hand of Doom token. Hellboy: The Board Game is expected to ship in February 2019 and is priced at £69.99, or about $95.

[h/t io9]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Space Goat Productions
arrow
entertainment
Love Board Games? Now You Can Invest in Them
Space Goat Productions
Space Goat Productions

The rise of crowdfunded products in recent years has been a boon to projects that might not have survived a long and winding corporate road to consumers. And while technological innovations, food, and film draw a lot of those dollars, it may surprise you to learn that the gaming category is at the top of Kickstarter’s leader board. Donors have spent a total of $813 million on nearly 38,000 different video and analog game projects, with board games dominating most of the market.

Starting May 1, board game and comic book publisher Space Goat Productions is taking that marriage of direct-to-consumer financing and entertainment a step further. They’ve launched a Wefunder campaign that will allow people to become equity investors in the company best known for its Evil Dead II, The Terminator, and Howling board games.

“We are the first publicly-owned board game and comic book hybrid company,” Shon Bury, Space Goat’s president, tells Mental Floss. “We have a foot in both niches.”

Equity fundraising was first made possible in 2012, when Congress passed the Jumpstart Our Business Startups, also known as the JOBS Act. The legislation allows companies to solicit investors for an ownership stake with the potential for a financial reward: The ability to sell to anyone online, not just private investors, began in May 2016. Bury, who had grown tired of seeking capital from banks reluctant to lend to small businesses, saw an opportunity for gaming fans to take on a larger role in the publisher’s efforts. Campaigns that people have a personal investment in—like the Beta Bionics fundraiser to back an experimental diabetes monitor, which raised over $1 million—tend to attract the most attention.

“Comic book and board game fans like the participatory process,” Bury says. “Something about that type of consumer wants to get involved in the hobby with creators.”

Visitors stop by a Space Goat Productions convention table
Space Goat Productions

By law, investors in Space Goat or any other company must invest a minimum $100 to obtain a future equity share with the company, which has been estimated at a $5 million potential valuation cap. While they don’t get to outvote Bury, who is the majority owner, they can—at certain pricing tiers—get involved in beta-testing games, offer feedback, and get discounts off Space Goat merchandise.

The money raised during the Wefunder’s 45-day campaign will go toward company overhead, production costs, convention expenses, marketing, license acquisition, and distribution of games to retail outlets. Both Evil Dead II and The Terminator are slated for a 2018 release, while The Howling, an original board game titled Game Buds, and a possible Evil Dead II graphic novel are on tap for 2019.

With Kickstarter campaigns, donors are usually reserved copies of the product along with incentive extras. For Wefunder, the objective is to back the company as a whole, not just a single release. If Space Goat continues to be successful, investors will be able to sell their shares once a second round of crowdfunding begins or if the company goes public. If they elect to keep their shares, they’ll get a proportional percentage of their net profit. Company valuations and revenues will be SEC-compliant, Bury says.

“This is an actual investment with risks,” he adds, which means it’s possible you could, like any investor, fail to realize a return. But for some gaming fans, wagering on the appeal of werewolves, Deadites, and Skynet is likely more interesting than trading pharmaceutical stocks.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios