Storms Head Across the U.S. This Week

Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

We just lived through one of the warmest winters in recent memory. The warmth and relative lack of storminess was odd compared to a normal year, but the weather was downright quiet compared to what we've seen over the last couple of years. Unfortunately, our luck is running out as the Sun creeps into the Northern Hemisphere and the atmosphere slowly warms up. The clash of the seasons will cause a steady train of storms to glide across the country through the end of March, bringing along with them noticeably rapid changes in weather from day to day, including the risk for severe thunderstorms and some beneficial heavy rainfall.

The forecast position of the jet stream from the GFS weather model on the evening of Monday, March 27, 2017, showing three troughs (southward dips) in the jet stream as they cross the United States. Image Credit: Tropical Tidbits

 
Current weather models suggest that a series of upper-level troughs—elongated areas of lower air pressure—will come ashore on the West Coast every couple of days for the next two weeks, each wave taking about three days to traverse the length of the United States before retreating over the Atlantic Ocean. Each trough will be sandwiched between ridges of high pressure, which are associated with warmer air and calmer skies. This trough-ridge combination will allow warm, unstable air to flow north from the Gulf of Mexico before the trough arrives to take advantage of the favorable atmosphere ahead of it. The end result will be heavy rain and thunderstorms, some of which could turn severe.

The greatest risk for severe thunderstorms with each wave will lie across the southern Plains and interior sections of the Gulf Coast states, exactly where you'd expect dangerous weather to develop at the end of March. The extent of the severe weather depends on how much instability, moisture, and wind shear are present when the storms bubble up. If the right mix of ingredients doesn't come together at the right time, the weather won't be much more than an inconvenience. If storms are able to take advantage of the right conditions, though, all types of severe weather—damaging winds, large hail, and tornadoes—will be possible with each outbreak of severe thunderstorms.

It shouldn't come as too much of a surprise that severe weather is ramping up as we get closer to April. We're rapidly approaching prime season for severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. The average number of tornadoes that touch down each day climbs rapidly between the end of March and the beginning of summer, with each day of spring becoming historically more favorable for nasty severe weather outbreaks.

The Weather Prediction Center's precipitation forecast (in inches) between March 24 and March 31, 2017. Image Credit: NOAA/WPC

 
The silver lining to the cycles between calm and stormy is that it will bring much-needed rain to just about everyone east of the Rockies who are currently experiencing drought conditions. The same weather pattern that allowed California to climb out of its drought in just a couple of months also dried the eastern half of the country to the point of drought. Moderate to severe drought conditions covered nearly 16 percent of the contiguous United States on the U.S. Drought Monitor's analysis for March 21, with the worst drought covering the central Plains and much of the East Coast.

Rain from the upcoming train of storm systems will drop several inches of rain over a widespread area, helping to put a small dent in the drought. It won't be enough to cure the parched earth in many places, but as Californians will tell you, any amount of rain can help.

A Pile of Manure and a Heat Wave Combined to Cause Spain’s Worst Wildfire in 20 Years

Lumppini, iStock/Getty Images Plus
Lumppini, iStock/Getty Images Plus
A pile of manure in Spain ignited on June 27, sparking a wildfire that has torn through more than 10,000 acres of forest and other Catalonian landscapes, CNN reports. The manure combusted in part because of a scorching heat wave that has swept across Europe this week; temperatures in the affected region hit 104°F, and Germany, Poland, and the Czech Republic all reached record-breaking June temps. Catalan regional interior minister Miquel Buch reported that authorities believe the manure was improperly stored on a chicken farm in the village of La Torre de l’Espanyol, where it was exposed to the worst of the heat, according to NBC News. The wildfire—Spain’s most devastating in 20 years—is affecting the region just west of Tarragona, a port city that is best known for its Roman ruins, which is situated along the Balearic Sea about 60 miles southwest of Barcelona. [[{"fid":"315211","view_mode":"width-constrained-728","fields":{"format":"width-constrained-728","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","field_image_subhead[und][0][value]":"","field_image_subhead[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_credits[und][0][value]":"PeterHermesFurian%2C%20iStock%2FGetty%20Images%20Plus","field_credits[und][0][format]":"unfiltered"},"type":"media","field_deltas":{"1":{"format":"width-constrained-728","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":false,"field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","field_image_subhead[und][0][value]":"","field_image_subhead[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_caption[und][0][value]":"","field_caption[und][0][format]":"unfiltered","field_credits[und][0][value]":"PeterHermesFurian%2C%20iStock%2FGetty%20Images%20Plus","field_credits[und][0][format]":"unfiltered"}},"link_text":false,"attributes":{"alt":"Map of Catalonia, Spain","height":728,"width":728,"class":"media-element file-width-constrained-728","data-delta":"1"}}]] The firefighting force includes about 350 firefighters, 12 fire engines, seven aircraft, two hydroplanes, and additional vehicles equipped with water tanks—all of which are techniques regularly used to fight massive blazes. Though high temperatures are expected to continue and the rough terrain itself is also a contributing factor in the rapid spread of the fire, the strong winds should soon abate; authorities have warned people to stay inside. Though more than 50 people have been evacuated from the area, no deaths have been reported thus far. While the spontaneous combustion of flammable materials like manure, hay, or compost is definitely possible, as evidenced by this situation, it’s not the most common way for wildfires to start. More common causes include lit cigarettes, unattended campfires, burning debris, and engine sparks. [h/t CNN]

Colorado Welcomed Summer With 2 Feet of Snow

Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

While people in some parts of the country celebrated the first day of summer with barbecues and trips to the beach, residents of north and north-central Colorado had a snow day. Areas west of Denver—including Grand Lake, Aspen, and Steamboat Springs—experienced snow storms on summer solstice, with snowfall totaling nearly 2 feet at the highest elevations, CBS Denver reports.

Snow started falling in the Rocky Mountains the morning of Friday, June 21 and continued Sunday. Areas at ground level weren't cold enough to experience the unusual weather, but at elevations of 7000 feet and above, it looked like a winter wonderland. Steamboat Springs, a ski resort town in Colorado’s Yampa Valley, accumulated 20 inches of snow on the longest day of the year.

While Colorado mountain towns are used to seeing snow at odd times of year, the weekend's weather was still out of the ordinary. The average snowfall for Steamboat Springs in June is 0.1 inches. Prior to last Friday, it had been 91 years since a snowstorm hit the city in late June.

Snow has fallen in the Rockies later than average in six out of the past seven years. Though it feels like an extension of winter, the trend may actually be a product of the warming atmosphere. A warmer climate affects the jet stream, potentially pushing its course further south and leading to unusual weather patterns, such as unseasonable snowstorms in Colorado.

That means residents of some parts of the state will have to wait to have their summer hikes and picnics. The weather was serious enough to shut down one road in Rocky Mountain National Park.

[h/t CBS Denver]

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