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Kirill Ignatyev via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-NC 2.0
Kirill Ignatyev via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-NC 2.0

Meet Asperitas, the Newest Addition to the Cloud Atlas

Kirill Ignatyev via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-NC 2.0
Kirill Ignatyev via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-NC 2.0

Cloud-spotters, rejoice! After years of lobbying, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has granted Asperitas formations a spot in the official cloud canon. The change is part of an update to the International Cloud Atlas released for World Meteorological Day on March 23.

The first iteration of the cloud atlas, published in the late 19th century, laid down the scientific standards for the monitoring and measurements of clouds and other meteorological phenomena. It formalized the system of taxonomy introduced by an amateur cloud-spotter in 1802, which mirrored the classification of plants and animals by sorting clouds into 10 major types, or genera, then splitting them further into varieties and species.

The last edition of the atlas was published in 1987. The clouds may not have changed since then, but the world has, and the WMO wants to keep up. The new edition will be all-online and include measurements and data from 191 different countries and territories. It will also feature one new species—the volutus, or tube-shaped cloud—and five supplementary features, including asperitas.

The inclusion of asperitas is a point of pride for Cloud Appreciation Society founder Gavin Pretor-Pinney, who says members have been sending in photos of asperitas-covered skies for more than a decade.

“Ever since we first noticed distinctive turbulent waves of cloud back in 2006 in images sent from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, US, we have argued that this formation did not easily fit within the existing naming system,” CAS noted on its website. “So we are very pleased that now, almost ten years later, asperitas is finally being accepted as an official classification by the World Meteorological Organisation.”

The taxonomy of clouds may sound fluffy to laypeople, but experts like WMO secretary-general Petteri Talaas take it very seriously. “If we want to forecast weather, we have to understand clouds,” he said in a statement. “If we want to model the climate system, we have to understand clouds. And if we want to predict the ability of water resources, we have to understand clouds.”

The theme of this year’s World Meteorological Day was—you guessed it—Understanding Clouds.

Spotted something spectacular? Check out the CAS website or the WMO’s submission guidelines to share it with the cloud-loving world.

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Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
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Weather Watch
It's So Cold In One Part of Russia That People's Eyelashes Are Freezing
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Henrik Djärv, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Oymyakon, a rural village in the eastern Russian region of Yakutia, is one of the coldest inhabited spots in the world. While some schools in the U.S. cancel classes as temperatures approach zero, schools in Oymyakon remain open in -40°F weather. But recently temperatures in the region have dropped too low even for seasoned locals to handle. As AP reports, the chill, which hit -88.6°F on January 16, is cold enough to break thermometers and freeze eyelashes.

Photos shared by residents on social media show the mercury in thermometers hovering at -70°F, the lowest temperature some are built to measure. When thermometers fail, people in Oymyakon have other ways of gauging the cold. Their uncovered eyelashes can freeze upon stepping outside. Hot water tossed in the air will also turn to snow before hitting the ground.

To Oymyakon's 500-odd citizens, the most recent cold snap is nothing out of the ordinary. Temperatures are perpetually below freezing there from late October to mid-May, and average temperatures for the winter months frequently reach −58 °F. On Tuesday, residents were advised to stay inside and stay as warm as possible. Of course, that directive wasn't enough to stop some adventurous locals from sneaking outside for selfies.

[h/t AP]

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Amazon
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Weather Watch
Heated Mats Keep Steps Ice-Free in the Winter
Amazon
Amazon

The first snow of the season is always exciting, but the magic can quickly run out when you remember all the hazards that come with icy conditions. Along with heating bills, frosted cars, and other pains, the ground develops a coat of ice that can be dangerous for pedestrians and drivers alike. Outdoor steps become particularly treacherous and many people find themselves clutching their railings for fear of making it to the bottom headfirst. Instead of putting salt down the next time it snows, consider a less messy approach: heated mats that quickly melt the ice away.

The handy devices are made with a thermoplastic material and can melt two inches of snow per hour. They're designed to be left outside, so you can keep them ready to go for the whole winter. The 10-by-30-inch mats fit on most standard steps and come with grips to help prevent slipping. A waterproof connector cable connects to additional mats so up to 15 steps can be covered.

Unfortunately, this convenience comes at a price: You need to buy a 120-volt power unit for them to work, and each mat is sold separately. Running at $60 a mat, the price can add up pretty quickly. Still, if you live in a colder place where it's pretty much always snowing, it might be worth it.

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