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As Seen on TV: 9 Cookbooks Based on Cartoons

amazon / istock
amazon / istock

There are a number of cookbooks dedicated to the animated delicacies created on your favorite cartoons. Pick up these books and you'll eating like a 'toon in no time.

1. BOB'S BURGERS; $12

In every episode of Bob's Burgers, the titular character comes up with a new burger of the day. The punny titles range from "New Bacon-ings" to "The Fig-eta Bout It Burger." All the characters (mostly Mort and Teddy) really seem to enjoy Bob's food, and now you can make the burgers yourself with this extensive, packed-with-puns cookbook.

Find it: Amazon

2. TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES; $24

These crime-fighting turtles scarf down a lot of pizza in their downtime, and now you can make pies inspired by the eating habits of Michelangelo, Donatello, Raphael, and Leonardo. All 65 recipes are by the pizza wiz behind the blog Thursday Night Pizza.

Find it: Amazon

3. POKEMON; $10

Make bento boxes fit to win a ribbon in a Pokemon Contest. You may not have any Ouran berries on hand, but this cookbook will walk you through how to make adorable food that looks like various monsters from the franchise.

Find it: Amazon

4. GARFIELD; $17

Mondays are the worst, but they're a little better with a home-cooked lasagna. You can find a recipe for that and many other Garfield-related treats with this Gooseberry Patch cookbook. There are 230 recipes to choose from, and even little quips from Jim Davis himself.

Find it: Amazon

5. ADVENTURE TIME; $18

Get ready to make bacon pancakes and lots of other dishes from the Land of Ooo. The official cookbook details how to make Soy People tofu, magic barbecue ribs, pink and fluffy cream puffs, and more.

Find it: Amazon

6. SPONGEBOB; $2

Spongebob is one of the best fry cooks in Bikini Bottom, but we will never get to try a Pretty Patty or Krusty Krab pizza. At the very least, children will enjoy this beginner's cookbook based on the cartoon. The recipes are geared toward 7 to 9 year olds who are just learning their way around the kitchen. All the recipes are meant to be at least a little healthy.

Find it: Amazon

7. FROZEN; $23

If the songs from Frozen are still somehow stuck in your head, you can hum them while making some wintry snacks from this recipe book. It even comes with cookie cutters shaped like Olaf and snowflakes.

Find it: Amazon

8. NICKTOONS; $5

Like the Spongebob cookbook, this spiral-bound guide aims to get kids interested in cooking with the help of some classic cartoon characters. The 56-page book has plenty of easy recipes that kids love, like mac n' cheese, popcorn, and more.

Find it: Amazon

9. DC SUPER HEROES; $19

Be the hero of any party by making one of the themed dishes in this cookbook. Most of the options are normal foods that are then fashioned with the DC heroes' logos. Burgers get Superman's "S" shield, pizza gets Green Lantern's insignia, and cupcakes become Bat-Signals. To help you get the shapes right, the book comes with stencils and character cut-outs.

Find it: Amazon

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literature
A Limited Edition, Handwritten Manuscript of The Great Gatsby Can Be Yours for $249
SP Books
SP Books

Fans of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic The Great Gatsby need to put this on their holiday wish list: The French manuscript publisher SP Books is releasing a deluxe, limited-edition version of Fitzgerald’s handwritten Gatsby manuscript.

A handwritten manuscript of 'The Great Gatsby' open to a page
SP Books

The 328-page, large-format edition is cloth-bound and features an ornamental, iron-gilded cover. The facsimile of Fitzgerald’s original manuscript shows how the author reworked, rewrote, and otherwise altered the book throughout his writing process, changing character’s names (Nick was named “Dud” at one point), cutting down scenes, and moving around where certain information was introduced to the plot, like where the reader finds out how Gatsby became wealthy, which in the original manuscript wasn’t revealed until the end of the book. For Fitzgerald superfans, it's also signed.

A page of the handwritten manuscript with a pen on it
SP Books

The publisher is only selling 1800 copies of the manuscript, so if you’re a lover of literary history, you’d better act fast.

It’s available from SP Books for $249.

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Pop Culture
An AI Program Wrote Harry Potter Fan Fiction—and the Results Are Hilarious
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

“The castle ground snarled with a wave of magically magnified wind.”

So begins the 13th chapter of the latest Harry Potter installment, a text called Harry Potter and the Portrait of What Looked Like a Large Pile of Ash. OK, so it’s not a J.K. Rowling original—it was written by artificial intelligence. As The Verge explains, the computer-science whizzes at Botnik Studios created this three-page work of fan fiction after training an algorithm on the text of all seven Harry Potter books.

The short chapter was made with the help of a predictive text algorithm designed to churn out phrases similar in style and content to what you’d find in one of the Harry Potter novels it "read." The story isn’t totally nonsensical, though. Twenty human editors chose which AI-generated suggestions to put into the chapter, wrangling the predictive text into a linear(ish) tale.

While magnified wind doesn’t seem so crazy for the Harry Potter universe, the text immediately takes a turn for the absurd after that first sentence. Ron starts doing a “frenzied tap dance,” and then he eats Hermione’s family. And that’s just on the first page. Harry and his friends spy on Death Eaters and tussle with Voldemort—all very spot-on Rowling plot points—but then Harry dips Hermione in hot sauce, and “several long pumpkins” fall out of Professor McGonagall.

Some parts are far more simplistic than Rowling would write them, but aren’t exactly wrong with regards to the Harry Potter universe. Like: “Magic: it was something Harry Potter thought was very good.” Indeed he does!

It ends with another bit of prose that’s not exactly Rowling’s style, but it’s certainly an accurate analysis of the main current that runs throughout all the Harry Potter books. It reads: “‘I’m Harry Potter,’ Harry began yelling. ‘The dark arts better be worried, oh boy!’”

Harry Potter isn’t the only work of fiction that Jamie Brew—a former head writer for ClickHole and the creator of Botnik’s predictive keyboard—and other Botnik writers have turned their attention to. Botnik has previously created AI-generated scripts for TV shows like The X-Files and Scrubs, among other ridiculous machine-written parodies.

To delve into all the magical fiction that Botnik users have dreamed up, follow the studio on Twitter.

[h/t The Verge]

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