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20 Classic Mystery Science Theater 3000 Episodes Are Dropping on Netflix

Shout! Factory

With just one month to go before the new season of Mystery Science Theater 3000 drops on Netflix on April 14, the moment MSTies have been waiting for for nearly 20 years has almost arrived. But today, Shout! Factory announced that fans have reason to get even more excited: on March 15, 20 of the bad movie-loving series’ classic episodes will drop on Netflix.

“The highly successful Mystery Science Theater Kickstarter campaign to #BringBackMST3K surpassed the goal of fully funding the production of 14 new episodes and set the world record as the highest-funded Film and TV crowdfunding campaign in history,” Shout! Factory noted in a press statement. Whether your MST3K tastes lean more toward Manos: The Hands of Fate or I Accuse My Parents, all of your favorites are here. Here’s a full list of the episodes:

Catalina Caper

Eegah!

Future War

The Giant Gila Monster

Hercules Against the Moon Men

Horrors of Spider Island

I Accuse My Parents

Jack Frost

Laserblast

Manos: The Hands of Fate

Merlin’s Shop of Mystical Wonders

Pod People

Puma Man

Santa Claus Conquers the Martians

Sidehackers

Space Mutiny

Teenagers from Outer Space

Time Chasers

Werewolf

Zombie Nightmare

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The Evolution of "Two" in the Indo-European Language Family
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The Indo-European language family includes most of the languages of Europe as well as many languages in Asia. There is a long research tradition that has shown, though careful historical comparison, that languages spanning a huge linguistic and geographical range, from French to Greek to Russian to Hindi to Persian, are all related to each other and sprung from a common source, Proto-Indo-European. One of the techniques for studying the relationship of the different languages to each other is to look at the similarities between individual words and work out the sound changes that led from one language to the next.

This diagram, submitted to Reddit by user IronChestplate1, shows the word for two in various Indo-European languages. (The “proto” versions, marked with an asterisk, are hypothesized forms, built by working backward from historical evidence.) The languages cluster around certain common features, but the words are all strikingly similar, especially when you consider the words for two in languages outside the Indo-European family: iki (Turkish), èjì (Yoruba), ni (Japanese), kaksi (Finnish), etc. There are many possible forms two could take, but in this particular group of languages it is extremely limited. What are the chances of that happening by accident? Once you see it laid out like this, it doesn’t take much to put *dwóh and *dwóh together.

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infographics
Beyond Plumbing: 19 Other Jobs on Mario's Resume
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Nintendo made news this week by subtly announcing that Mario is no longer a plumber. In fact, they're really downplaying his whole plumbing career. On the character's Japanese-language bio, the company says, "He also seems to have worked as a plumber a long time ago."

But Mario has always had plenty of jobs on the side. Here's a look at his resume:

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