13 Lucky Facts About St. Patrick's Day

iStock/Funwithfood
iStock/Funwithfood

Before you don your "Kiss me, I'm Irish" tee and set out to find a perfect pour of Guinness (or four), read up on some history of the day where we all claim to be at least a wee bit Irish.

1. We should really be wearing blue on St. Patrick's Day.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard.

Saint Patrick himself would have to deal with pinching on his feast day. Though we've come to associate kelly green with the Irish and the holiday, the 5th-century saint's official color was "Saint Patrick's blue," a light shade of sky blue. The color green only became associated with the big day after it was linked to the Irish independence movement in the late 18th century.

2. St. Patrick wasn't Irish.

St. Patrick's Grave, Down Cathedral
Central Press/Getty Images

Although he made his mark by introducing Christianity to Ireland in the year 432, Patrick wasn't Irish himself. He was born to Roman parents in Scotland or Wales in the late 4th century.

3. St. Patrick's Day used to be a dry holiday.

A 1952 Guinness ad.
Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

As you might expect, Saint Patrick's Day is a huge deal in his old stomping grounds. It's a national holiday in both Ireland and Northern Ireland, but up until the 1970s, pubs were closed on that day. (The one exception went to beer vendors at the big national dog show, which was always held on St. Patrick's Day.) Before that time, the saint's feast day was considered a more solemn, strictly religious occasion. Now, the country welcomes hordes of green-clad tourists for parades, drinks, and perhaps the reciting of a few limericks.

4. New York City's St. Patrick's Day parade has been happening since 1762.

St. Patrick's Day parade in New York City, 1960
Peter Keegan/Getty Images

New York City's St. Patrick's Day Parade is one of the world's largest parades. Since 1762, roughly 250,000 marchers have traipsed up 5th Avenue on foot—the parade still doesn't allow floats, cars, or other modern trappings. Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Archbishop of New York; and Miracle on 34th Street actress Maureen O'Hara have served as Grand Marshal.

5. Chicago literally runs green for St. Patrick's Day.

Green Chicago River on St. Patrick's Day
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

New York may have more manpower, but Chicago has a spectacle all its own. The city has been celebrating St. Patrick by dumping green dye into the Chicago River since 1962. And though the organizers won't reveal their exact formula, we do know that the orange powder used is dispersed through flour sifters by the local Plumbers Union.

6. For some St. Patrick's Day parades, it's the thought that counts.

Not every city goes all-out in its celebratory efforts. From 1999 to 2007, the Irish village of Dripsey proudly touted that it hosted the Shortest Saint Patrick's Day Parade in the World. The route ran for 26 yards between two pubs. Today, Hot Springs, Arkansas claims the title for brevity—its brief parade runs for 98 feet.

7. There's a reason for the shamrocks.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard.
The Casas-Rodríguez Postcard Collection, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

How did the shamrock become associated with St. Patrick? According to Irish legend, the saint used the three-leafed plant (which is not to be confused with the four-leaf clover) as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity when he was first introducing Christianity to Ireland.

8. Cold weather helped St. Patrick's claim to fame.

In Irish lore, St. Patrick gets credit for driving all the snakes out of Ireland. Modern scientists suggest that the job might not have been too hard—according to the fossil record, Ireland has never been home to any snakes. Through the Ice Age, Ireland was too cold to host any reptiles, and the surrounding seas have staved off serpentine invaders ever since. Modern scholars think the "snakes" St. Patrick drove away were likely metaphorical.

9. There's no corn in that beef.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard.

Corned beef and cabbage, which has become a traditional St. Patrick's Day staple for Irish Americans, doesn't have anything to do with the grain corn. Instead, it's a nod to the large grains of salt that were historically used to cure meats, which were also known as "corns."

10. Americans run up quite a bar tab on St. Patrick's Day.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard.

All of the St. Patrick's Day revelry is great news for brewers. A 2012 estimate pegged the total amount Americans spent on beer for St. Paddy's celebrations at $245 million—and that's before tipping the bartender. Not only that, but Americans headed to Ireland were estimated to spend $955 million on flights, accommodations, and other tourism industry staples.

11. It could have been Saint Maewyn's Day.

Vintage
Vintage "Erin Go Bragh" postcard.
antifixus21, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

According to Irish legend, St. Patrick wasn't originally called Patrick. His birth name was Maewyn Succat, but he changed it to Patricius after becoming a priest.

12. There are no female leprechauns.

Vintage St. Patrick's Day postcard.
Don The UpNorth Memories Guy, Flickr // CC BY-ND-NC 2.0

Don’t be fooled by any holiday decorations showing lady leprechauns. In traditional Irish folk tales, there are no female leprechauns, only nattily attired little guys who spend their days making and mending shoes (meaning they earned that gold they're always guarding).

13. St. Patrick's Day lingo makes sense.

Vintage

You can't attend a St. Patrick’s Day event without hearing a cry of "Erin go Bragh." What's the phrase mean? It's a corruption of the Irish Éirinn go Brách, which means roughly "Ireland Forever."

How Mister Rogers Used King Friday to Make Friday the 13th Less Scary for Kids

Getty Images
Getty Images

King Friday XIII, son of King Charming Thursday XII and Queen Cinderella Monday, is an avid arts lover, a talented whistler, and a former pole vaulter. He reigns over Calendarland with lots of pomp and poise, and he’s usually correct.

Fans of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood may also remember that the monarch was born on Friday the 13th, because his birthday was celebrated on the program every Friday the 13th. Though the math isn’t perfect—according to Timeanddate.com, Friday the 13th sometimes happens two or three times a year—the heartwarming reason behind the unconventionally-timed birthday celebrations absolutely is.

Fred Rogers explained that he wanted to give children a reason to look forward to Friday the 13th, instead of buying into the negative superstitions that surround the dreaded date. “We thought, ‘Let’s start children out thinking that Friday the 13th was a fun day,’” he said in a 1999 interview. “So we would celebrate his birthday every time a Friday the 13th came.”

Rogers added that the tradition worked out so well partially because the show was broadcast live, and viewers knew to anticipate an especially festive episode whenever they spotted a Friday the 13th on the calendar.

Speaking of calendars: There’s an equally charming story behind the name Calendarland. In the same interview, Rogers disclosed that King Friday once asked children to write in with suggestions for his then-nameless country. One boy posited that since King Friday was named after a calendar date, his realm should be named after the calendar. Then, the lucky youngster was invited to the set, where King Friday christened him a prince of Calendarland.

King Friday might be king of Calendarland, but Mister Rogers is definitely the king of understanding how to make kids feel safe, smart, and special.

Mattel Is Releasing a Day of the Dead Barbie Doll

Mattel
Mattel

Barbie may be celebrating her 60th birthday, but she she looks as fresh-faced today as she did when she first emerged from her box in the spring of 1959. In celebration of Barbie's new sexagenarian status, Mattel—the toy company that has sold more than a billion Barbie dolls—is releasing a range of limited-edition Barbies, including Rosa Parks, Sally Ride, and David Bowie dolls. Now, according to USA Today, the company is getting into the autumnal spirit with its latest collectible: a Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, Barbie.

Retailing for $75, the doll will be sold on Amazon and at Target and Walmart stores beginning tomorrow, September 12. The doll “honors the traditions, symbols, and rituals often seen throughout this time,” Mattel told CNN. Día de los Muertos is celebrated primarily in Mexico from October 31 to November 2 and is a day to pay tribute to those who have passed on—who supposedly return for a brief visit of their own.

Barbie has always been known for her excellent fashion sense, and she’s dressed for this occasion wearing a black, ruffled dress embroidered with monarch butterflies, as well as yellow and red marigolds. The Día de los Muertos Barbie's face is painted as a traditional Day of the Dead skull mask and she's decked out with a headpiece featuring marigolds and more monarchs.

The butterflies are symbolic: Every winter in Mexico, billions of monarch butterflies descend into the mountains and forests in Mexico. Because they arrive at the beginning of Day of the Dead, some people believe that the insects are carrying the spirits of the dearly departed with them.

[h/t USA Today]

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