How a Throwback Rockabilly Jam Made Its Way Onto '90s Mainstream Charts

Epic Records
Epic Records

The '90s airwaves were full of catchy, confusing pop hits. What exactly is a "chica cherry cola"? Did anyone ever figure out the correct syncopation of "MMMBop"? Why was Deee-Lite grooving to Dr. Seuss books? And who were all those Rays that Jimmy was singing about?

It's been nearly two decades, yet 1998's "Are You Jimmy Ray?"—the one and only hit by gloriously coiffed British pop rocker Jimmy Ray—stands out as one of the more perplexing hits of the era. For starters, whose idea was it to mix twangy '50s rockabilly with the sunny '90s alt-rock style of Smash Mouth? The combo clearly worked, as Ray's retro-modern anomaly reached No. 13 on the Billboard Hot 100, earning him a slot opening for the Backstreet Boys on a 1998 U.S. tour.

And then there are the questions built into the song itself. "Are you Johnnie Ray? Are you Slim Ray? Are you Link Wray? Are you Fay Wray?" Jimmy Ray sings in the chorus, apparently echoing things he has been asked on a regular basis. The only answer he provides, of course, is another question: "Who wants to know?" Factor in the music video, wherein Ray and a bunch of hip-hop dancers cavort around outside a trailer home, and this mystery seems like something David Lynch and Carson Daly might've somehow cooked up together.

Fortunately, Jimmy Ray is on LinkedIn, and last fall, the 46-year-old London native wrote a candid and insightful article explaining how he—a guy who sounded like Sugar Ray auditioning for Sun Records—scored such a massive pop hit.

"I have been asked questions about it that surprised me," Ray says of his signature song. "Surprising considering the music press received the song as nothing more than a boneheaded piece of self-promotion."

"Are You Jimmy Ray?" might have been self-promotion, but it wasn't boneheaded. A longtime fan of '50s rock, Ray had actually gotten his start in a '90s techno group called A/V. After they split up, he landed a management deal with Simon Fuller, the guy who created the Spice Girls. Someone at Ray’s label suggested he collaborate with Conall Fitzpatrick, the pop songsmith behind the British duo Shampoo's 1994 hit "Trouble." Fitzpatrick obviously had a flair for booming drums and repetitive catchphrases, and before the two even sat down for their first writing session, he had come up with the "Are You Jimmy Ray?" hook.

Ray wonders whether Fitzpatrick might have been "subconsciously influenced" by the cryptic "Who is Christian Goldman?" graffiti seen all over London at the time. Fitzpatrick claims he got the idea from the 1988 film Midnight Run; in one scene, Charles Grodin's character asks a bartender, "Who's in charge here?" to which the fellow replies, "Who wants to know?" As for all those "Rays"—pre-Elvis teen idol Johnnie Ray, "father of the power chord" Link Wray, King Kong actress Fay Wray, the Chevrolet Corvette Stingray—they were also Fitzpatrick's idea. But Jimmy Ray knew what Fitzpatrick was going for.

"Retro heroes and heroines who symbolized my own cultural interests from music, film, and … motoring haha!" Jimmy writes in summary. "I couldn't even drive a car at this time."

Portraits of Johnnie Ray, Fay Wray, and Link Wray.
Keystone Features/Hulton Archive/Getty Images; Hulton Archive/Getty Images; Eric Frommer, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY–SA 2.0

Fitzpatrick knew the kind of stuff Jimmy dug, but the two weren't 100 percent on the same page. Working with Fitzpatrick's gear, in Fitzpatrick's studio, Ray felt like his debut album was slipping out of his control. "Before then, I had always been in the pilot's seat making my music, so let's just say there was a teeny-weeny bit of tension right from the off," Ray wrote.

For instance, he had to fight to replace the original fake-sounding synth-bass with "a different, more realistic synth bass." He alludes in the LinkedIn piece to other battles, but ultimately, he might not have pushed too hard. After all, he didn't think "Are You Jimmy Ray?" was going to be a single.

Alas, the execs at Epic Records knew they had a hit on their hands, and just like that, Jimmy Ray was all over the airwaves with a song that "wasn't really my idea." While Ray insisted that he respects and admires Fitzpatrick for creatively handling the pressure of having to produce a hit record for a major label, the tone of the LinkedIn piece suggests that Ray might've gone a different route if he'd been in the driver's seat.

Ray actually may get that do-over, as the singer is prepping a new album on his own La Rocka Records tentatively titled Live to Fight Another Day, which is set for an October release. He has posted some demos online, including one Morrissey-esque cover of Elvis Presley's "Devil In Disguise." It’s a cool track that sounds as though he's moved beyond the "pop-a-billy hip-hop" that put him on the charts back in the day. And with other '90s acts making the most of nostalgia ticket sales (after all, Jimmy Ray's old pals the Backstreet Boys have a world tour planned for their 25th anniversary next year), it seems like the right time to revive the old question of just who this Jimmy Ray fellow is.

Peter Dinklage Faked His Own Death on Game of Thrones to Mess With People

HBO
HBO

by Kwadar Ray

Tyrion Lannister has been one of the few Game of Thrones characters to survive the gory, fantasy/action series. ​Ned Stark, Robb Stark, and Khal Drogo are just some of the many prominent characters Lannister has outlasted. Despite Tyrion's wherewithal and smarts to keep himself alive, the actor behind the character, ​Peter Dinklage, enjoys doing the exact opposite just for kicks.

While promoting his upcoming film I Think We’re Alone Now, the actor revealed on Jimmy Kimmel Live! that he enjoys staging his death and waiting for unsuspecting crew members to find his body.

"I like to pretend I’m dead. It’s always fun," Dinklage said nonchalantly. "Just my legs sprawled out in the trailer. You’ve got to get really smushed into the floor in a very awkward position ... I’ll wait hours. We have a lot of time on set."

Dinklage explained that he does not have a usual victim. "For whoever, the wardrobe person or the producers," the equal opportunity prankster told Kimmel.

It's hilarious the Emmy-winning actor plays some pretty dark pranks on set, but we just sincerely hope him revealing this is not his way of foreshadowing for the eighth and final season of the show. Even if we know it's ​going to be a heartbreaking season, we need Tyrion to keep on pushing along!

Everything You Need to Know About the New DC Universe Streaming Service

Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Warner Bros. Television

by Natalie Zamora

Although the fates of two major DC superheroes, Superman and Batman, are kind of up in the air right now as far as for their Extended Universes, things are looking up for the franchise, as their exclusive streaming service has just launched. Here's everything you need to know about DC Universe.

THE SIGNIFICANCE

With all the different types of streaming services we have today, why is DC Universe so special, and why would someone pay for it if they can find the content elsewhere? Well, this streaming service allows all your favorite DC content to live in one space. Instead of having to search for what you want throughout the internet, you can find it all here. For the die-hard fan, this is perfect.

DC Universe offers an impressive collection of live-action and animated movies, TV shows, documentaries, and comic books. The service also offers exclusive toys you can only get by being a subscriber.

THE CONTENT

Heath Ledger stars as The Joker in 'The Dark Knight' (2008)
© TM & DC Comics/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

So, what exact DC content lives on DC Universe? Well, there's a range of content from recent to old-school, such as Batman: The Animated Series, The Dark Knight, Teen Titans, and Constantine. Apart from what's on there now, the service will be debuting the live-action Titans series later this year, along with Swamp Thing and Doom Patrol in 2019. DC is also developing new series for Harley Quinn and Young Justice: Outsiders, exclusively for the service.

THE PRICE

​To get all of this exclusive DC content, it must be expensive, right? No, not really. Compared to Netflix, which is $10.99 a month, DC Universe is inexpensive, at a rate of $7.99 monthly or $74.99 annually. It is a bit pricier than Hulu, however, which is $5.99 monthly for the first year, then $7.99 monthly after. Like most streaming services, you can also try a free seven-day trial with DC Universe.

HOW TO SIGN UP

​Are you sold? If so, the sign up process is fairly simple. Head to ​DC Universe, create an account, and choose your plan, either monthly or annually. Either way, you'll get your free seven-day trial to browse around and see for yourself if it's really worth it.

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