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Pitcairn Island. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
Pitcairn Island. Image creditWikimedia Commons // Public Domain

The World’s Most Difficult (and Impossible) Places to Reach

Pitcairn Island. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
Pitcairn Island. Image creditWikimedia Commons // Public Domain

It’s easy to take modern air travel for granted. Before a lack of legroom and Wi-Fi ranked among our top complaints, globetrotters had to hunker down for trips lasting upwards of 40 days if they wished to leave the continent. While most locations on the opposite side of the globe can be reached in less than a day now, there are still plenty of places that require an epic trek.

This video from the YouTube channel RealLifeLore highlights some of the world’s most difficult destinations. The list includes remote islands without airports, like the Kerguelen Islands in the Indian Ocean and Pitcairn Island in the Pacific, as well as treacherous mountaintops. Mount Everest may be the highest summit on Earth, but it’s hardly the least accessible. Gangkhar Puensum in Bhutan is in the running for that title: Thrill-seekers are banned from climbing the mountain by the government. For more out-of-the-way destinations that are actually inhabited by people, check out our list of the most isolated towns on Earth.

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Douglas Grundy, Three Lions/Getty Images
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This 1940 Film on Road Maps Will Make You Appreciate Map Apps Like Never Before
Douglas Grundy, Three Lions/Getty Images
Douglas Grundy, Three Lions/Getty Images

In the modern era, we take for granted having constantly updated, largely accurate maps of just about every road in the world at our fingertips. If you need to find your way through a city or across a country, Google Maps has your back. You no longer have to go out and buy a paper map.

But to appreciate just what a monstrous task making road maps and keeping them updated was in decades past, take a look at this vintage short film, "Caught Mapping," spotted at the Internet Archive by National Geographic.

The 1940 film, produced by the educational and promotional company Jam Handy Organization (which created films for corporations like Chevrolet), spotlights the difficult task of producing and revising maps to keep up with new road construction and repair.

The film is a major booster of the mapmaking industry, and those involved in it come off as near-miracle workers. The process of updating maps involved sending scouts out into the field to drive along every road and note conditions, compare the roads against topographical maps, and confirm mileage figures. Then, those scouts reported back to the draughtsmen responsible for producing revised maps every two weeks. The draughtsmen updated the data on road closures and other changes.

Once those maps were printed, they were "ready to give folks a good steer," as the film's narrator puts it, quietly determining the success of any road trip in the country.

"Presto! and right at their fingertips, modern motorists can have [information] on any road they wish to take." A modern marvel, really.

[h/t National Geographic]

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David Rumsey Historical Map Collection // CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
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The Largest Known Map of the 16th-Century World Has Been Digitized
David Rumsey Historical Map Collection // CC BY-NC-SA 3.0
David Rumsey Historical Map Collection // CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

The challenge of designing an accurate, detailed world map has stumped cartographers for centuries, but Urbano Monte got pretty close to achieving perfection in 1587. Now, for the first time, his full 10-by-10-foot world map has been assembled and digitized, Co.Design reports.

There are only two copies of the map: one in Milan, Italy and the second, digitized one at the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection at Stanford University. The massive, extremely detailed illustration, which comprises 60 hand-drawn sheets, is the largest known early map in the world. The Italian cartographer drew it using the azimuthal equidistant projection, which depicts the flattened globe with the North Pole at its center. According to Monte, this gave a more accurate view of the Earth than the Mercator Projection, which was published just two decades earlier in 1569.

The map's depth of detail becomes more apparent the longer you look at it. In addition to country names and geographical landmarks, Monte took the time to note information on weather, meteorological events, length of days at different latitudes, world leaders, and significant countries and places.

Map details.
David Rumsey Historical Map Collection // CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

To view the completed map in all its glory, you can download the 3D image through Google Earth or view it through Apple’s augmented reality app AR Globe.

[h/t Co.Design]

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