CLOSE
Walter Pfeiffer // Sotheby's International
Walter Pfeiffer // Sotheby's International

Former Castle of Guinness Beer Heiress for Sale in Ireland

Walter Pfeiffer // Sotheby's International
Walter Pfeiffer // Sotheby's International

Looking for a venue for this year’s St. Patrick’s Day festivities? The former castle of a Guinness Beer heiress is now up for sale, according to TopTenRealEstateDeals.com. Sotheby’s International lists the Irish estate at nearly $30 million.

The "Luggala" mansion has stood for centuries, but its heyday came in the mid 20th century. Ernest Guinness, the great-great-grandson of the beer company’s founder, gave the castle as a wedding gift to his daughter Oonagh, Lady Oranmore and Browne, in 1937. During her occupation, the house was the site of scandalous partying, drama, and tragedy.

That period in the property’s history was so notorious that it became the subject of a 2012 book titled Luggala Days: The Story of a Guinness House. In it, author Robert O’Byrne writes, "Guests were invited for drinks or dinner, only to emerge several days later blinking at the harsh light of the ordinary world, aware that during that lost period of time they had enjoyed themselves immensely without necessarily being clear about the details of how or why, or even with whom." Some notable houseguests included Michael Jackson, Bono, and the Rolling Stones.

The gothic castle survived decades of debauchery and managed to retain its 18th-century charm. The 5000-acre property comprises seven lodges and cottages, gardens, a guest house, and a seven-bedroom main structure. And if the new owners feel inspired to make a pilgrimage to the birthplace of Guinness beer, Dublin is within driving distance.

Antonio Martinelli // Sotheby's International

TB // Sotheby's International

Antonio Martinelli // Sotheby's International

Antonio Martinelli // Sotheby's International

[h/t TopTenRealEstateDeals.com]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Ker Robertson, Getty Images
arrow
architecture
5 Scrapped Designs for the World's Most Famous Buildings
Ker Robertson, Getty Images
Ker Robertson, Getty Images

When an architect gets commissioned to build a skyscraper or a memorial, they’re usually not the only applicant for the job. Other teams of designers submit their own ideas for how it should look, too, but these are eventually passed over in favor of the final design. This is the case for some of the world’s most recognizable landmarks—in an alternate world, the Arc de Triomphe might have been a three-story-tall elephant statue, and the Lincoln Memorial a step pyramid.

GoCompare, a comparison site for financial services, dug into these could-have-been designs for Alternate Architecture, an illustrated collection of scrapped designs for some of the most famous structures in the world, from Chicago's Tribune Tower to the Sydney Opera House.

Click through the interactive graphic below to explore rejected designs for all five landmarks.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Paul Wegener
arrow
Design
For Sale: The Safest House in America, Complete With Hidden Command Center
Paul Wegener
Paul Wegener

For some people, locking the front door just isn't enough to feel fully safe at home. Maybe they set up a home security system. Maybe they go out and buy a fancy smart home hub with a security camera. Or maybe they spend six years and $30 million to build a veritable fortress mansion, as one guy in Atlanta did. That house, called the Rice House and referred to as one of the safest homes in America, is now up for sale for $14.7 million.

Built by an entrepreneur who hired a security architect with a background designing Justice Department buildings (and his own bunker/house), the Rice House is billed as a "modern fortress" in the real estate listing.

For its owner, creating an impenetrable home was more of a personal challenge than a real security need, according to Bloomberg. But by its features, you'd think it was built for a Bond super-villain or a head of state, not a businessman in a wealthy Atlanta neighborhood.

A secure door with several locks
Paul Wegener

It has its own water and power supply, a 5000-square-foot command center hidden behind a waterfall, a vault, and doors capable of withstanding machine gun fire. There’s an indoor gun range, in case you need some target practice. There’s enough room in the garage for 30 cars, in case you have a few dozen Batmobiles—or you want to invite friends to hunker down with you during the apocalypse.

And since anyone who lives there might be more invested in staying safely inside the gates than going out on the weekends, the place has plenty of amenities that make it a standalone mini-community. It’s got its own art gallery, a gym, a bowling alley, a wine cellar, a home theater, and a pool. It has three kitchens and two commercial elevators, with staff quarters so the servants you inevitably need to cater to you never need to leave, either.

But wait, there’s more. If the house lacks something you want, that’s fine! Because according to the listing, “the property purposefully awaits final personalization.” In other words, for your $14.7 million, it’s not finished.

Check it out here.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios