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Walter Pfeiffer // Sotheby's International

Former Castle of Guinness Beer Heiress for Sale in Ireland

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Walter Pfeiffer // Sotheby's International

Looking for a venue for this year’s St. Patrick’s Day festivities? The former castle of a Guinness Beer heiress is now up for sale, according to TopTenRealEstateDeals.com. Sotheby’s International lists the Irish estate at nearly $30 million.

The "Luggala" mansion has stood for centuries, but its heyday came in the mid 20th century. Ernest Guinness, the great-great-grandson of the beer company’s founder, gave the castle as a wedding gift to his daughter Oonagh, Lady Oranmore and Browne, in 1937. During her occupation, the house was the site of scandalous partying, drama, and tragedy.

That period in the property’s history was so notorious that it became the subject of a 2012 book titled Luggala Days: The Story of a Guinness House. In it, author Robert O’Byrne writes, "Guests were invited for drinks or dinner, only to emerge several days later blinking at the harsh light of the ordinary world, aware that during that lost period of time they had enjoyed themselves immensely without necessarily being clear about the details of how or why, or even with whom." Some notable houseguests included Michael Jackson, Bono, and the Rolling Stones.

The gothic castle survived decades of debauchery and managed to retain its 18th-century charm. The 5000-acre property comprises seven lodges and cottages, gardens, a guest house, and a seven-bedroom main structure. And if the new owners feel inspired to make a pilgrimage to the birthplace of Guinness beer, Dublin is within driving distance.

Antonio Martinelli // Sotheby's International

TB // Sotheby's International

Antonio Martinelli // Sotheby's International

Antonio Martinelli // Sotheby's International

[h/t TopTenRealEstateDeals.com]

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Design
Watch an Artist Build a Secret Studio Beneath an Overpass
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Lebrel

Artists can be very particular about the spaces where they choose to do their work. Furniture designer Fernando Abellanas’s desk may not boast the quietest or most convenient location on Earth, but it definitely wins points for seclusion. According to Co.Design, the artist covertly constructed his studio beneath a bridge in Valencia, Spain.

To make his vision a reality, Abellanas had to build a metal and plywood apparatus and attach it to the top of an underpass. After climbing inside, he uses a crank to wheel the box to the top of the opposite wall. There, the contents of his studio, including his desk, chair, and wall art, are waiting for him.

The art nook was installed without permission from the city, so Abellanas admits that it’s only a matter of time before the authorities dismantle it or it's raided by someone else. While this space may not be permanent, he plans to build others like it around the city in secret. You can get a look at his construction process in the video below.

[h/t Co.Design]

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architecture
One of Frank Lloyd Wright's Final Residential Designs Goes on Sale in Ohio
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In case you’ve missed the many recent sales of Frank Lloyd Wright-designed real estate, you have yet another chance to secure yourself a historical starchitect home. The Louis Penfield House is being sold by its original owners, and it could be yours for a cool $1.3 million. The restored Usonian home in Willoughby Hills, Ohio has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 2003.

The house is currently a vacation rental and, depending on the preference of the new owner, it could continue to operate as a tourist destination. Or you could take it over as your private residence, which sounds pretty luxurious. It still has a floor-to-ceiling glass-walled living room that looks out on the Chagrin River, and comes with all the original furniture Wright designed. Like Wright’s other Usonian homes, it has a radiant-floor heating system that draws on a natural gas well onsite.

A retro-looking living room features floor-to-ceiling windows.
A bedroom is filled with vintage wooden furniture.

Around the same time as the original commission, Louis and Pauline Penfield also asked Wright to create another house on an adjacent property, and that home would prove to be the architect’s final residential design. It was still on the drawing board when he died unexpectedly in 1959. The sale of the Penfield House includes the original plans for the second house, called Riverrock, so you’d be getting more like 1.5 Frank Lloyd Wright houses. Seems like a pretty good deal to us.

All images via Estately

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