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10 Fun Facts About All That  

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Nickelodeon

To those who grew up in the 1990s and early 2000s, All That was must-see television. A kid-centered, Saturday Night Live-style variety show, it ran for 10 seasons, begat a spinoff movie, and helped launch the careers of a number of rising musicians, from Usher to Coolio. Here’s some vital information for your everyday nostalgia.

1. TEST AUDIENCES DIDN’T LIKE IT VERY MUCH.

All That was the brainchild of writer Dan Schneider and producers Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin. Like all sketch programs, the show relied heavily upon the talents of its cast, which was painstakingly assembled over the course of several months of auditions. Once eight young actors were chosen as All That’s main cast, it was time to shoot the pilot episode. Filming took place in January, 1994—and then came a period of limbo.

“[About] six months went by and I didn’t hear anything,” Schneider said. To his dismay, he learned that the footage had tested poorly with focus groups. “Basically, the company who ran the testing wrote a report that wasn’t too great. Their opinion was: Kids probably wouldn’t like this new sketch comedy show for kids,” Schneider remembered. “But luckily, the people at the network decided to give us a chance anyway. They picked up the show, and we all flew back to Orlando [where the pilot had been filmed] to write and produce the first season.”

2. EMMA STONE AUDITIONED FOR THE SHOW.

In an appearance on The Tonight Show, Emma Stone revealed that, at the tender age of 12, she auditioned for All That. At her tryout, the future Academy Award-winner showed off three original characters, including a demonically-possessed babysitter and “a cheerleader who couldn’t spell what she was cheering.” Though she didn’t get the gig, Stone remembers the event fondly. “It was a pretty special experience,” she told Jimmy Fallon.

3. KEL MITCHELL BEGAN DEVELOPING HIS “ED” PERSONA AT A VERY YOUNG AGE.  

“Ed started out when I was about eight,” Mitchell told the Los Angeles Times. “I used to watch professional wrestling and copy the kind of wild ‘dude’ voices the wrestlers had in their interviews.” In an early All That sketch, Mitchell reused that voice while playing an energetic pizza delivery guy, and the rest is history. Mitchell’s performance inspired the show’s iconic “Good Burger” segment in which he starred as Ed, the lovable but dimwitted cashier of a fast food restaurant. By the way, Mitchell deserves credit for giving the character his trademark hairdo. “I wanted Ed to have a look,” he told The A.V. Club in 2015. “I remember I went to the hair room and I saw these … early Brandy ‘90s Milli Vanilli braids. I put those on and it came to life.” 

4. THE FIRST TWO SEASONS WERE TAPED AT UNIVERSAL ORLANDO’S NICKELODEON STUDIOS.  

For the young stars, this was a pretty sweet arrangement. “The [Nickelodeon] studios were literally right inside Universal Studios, so whenever we could—on lunch break, or whenever we had a break—we would sneak into [the park] and ride the rides and eat a bunch of junk food and then sneak back in,” original cast member Alisa Reyes recalled.

At an All That reunion panel hosted during 2015 New York Comic Con, Josh Server—aka: Ear Boy—waxed nostalgic about the experience. “We’d cut lines and piss everyone off,” he gloated. On the other hand, he did acknowledge that his awesome workplace wasn’t without its drawbacks. During All That’s tenure in Orlando, the theme park offered a guided tour through the Nickelodeon Studios.  Guests would get to watch the teenage actors through a series of glass walls—which led to a few awkward moments. “You’d be getting your makeup done, and then there’d be a kid just [staring at you],” Server stated. After All That’s second season wrapped up, the remainder of the series was shot at Nickelodeon on Sunset, a Hollywood-based facility.

5. CHRIS FARLEY ONCE TRASHED THE SET.

Of all the program’s celebrity guests, few made a bigger splash than Chris Farley. In 1997, during a special edition of “Cooking with Randy,” Keenan Thompson’s chocoholic Chef Randy character went toe-to-toe with a ketchup-crazed cook known only as Chef Farley. The result? Hilarity and a condiment-drenched set. 

According to Server, the bit was filmed in one take—thanks entirely to Farley. “He knew they would make him do [the sketch] over and over again, so he went out there and literally trashed the stage. It was the messiest thing I had ever seen, and he made it impossible for the production team to reset for another take,” Server revealed.

6. TLC’S CONNECTION WITH ALL THAT GOES BEYOND THE THEME SONG.

TLC had the distinction of being All That’s very first musical guests. At Robbins’s invitation, the women showcased their talents in the pilot episode. (By the way, Kel Mitchell has said that the original “Kenan and Kel” moment came in the same episode—specifically, it happened when he and Kennan Thompson ad-libbed some banter before introducing TLC.) To Left Eye Lopez, T-Boz Watkins, and Chili Thomas, All That looked like a promising new series. “They loved the show, they loved Nickelodeon,” Robbins notes. “So I asked [if they’d record our theme song] and they said yes. A month later, they released CrazySexyCool. Who knew they’d go on to sell 11 million albums?”

7. LORI BETH DENBERG IS NOW AN ORDAINED MINISTER.

A Nickelodeon legend, you may recognize Lori Beth Denberg as the advice-giver of “Vital Information for Your Everyday Life” fame—or as earth’s loudest librarian, Ms. Hushbaum. Since leaving the show in 1998, she’s appeared in such films as Dodgeball and 18 Fingers of Death. These days, when Denberg isn’t acting or doing standup, she’s helping couples tie the knot.

“It started as a joke when a friend I’ve had since the first grade decided to get married,” the All That alum explained on her official website. “They weren’t very religious and couldn’t decide on an officiant, so I jokingly volunteered.” Denberg’s next move was to get herself ordained as a minister through the Universal Church. Then, she rolled up her sleeves and started working on the service. As Denberg told ABC news, “I wrote a whole specialized ceremony for them and people just loved it. They said, ‘This is so great. You should do this. You should offer this service.’ So, I took their advice!” Today, she offers “personalized, quirky weddings, vow renewals, and commitment ceremonies for couples looking for something a little bit different, a little less sterile, and a little more fun.” “It’s my favorite thing to do,” Denberg says.

8. THE “SUGAR AND COFFEE” SKETCHES USED A FAR LESS APPETIZING BEVERAGE. 

This high-energy spoof of TV morning shows was co-hosted by Kyle Sullivan as “Bates” and Lisa Foiles as “Kaffy.” Week after week, the over-caffeinated anchors would literally funnel sugar and coffee down the throats of their unsuspecting guests. All was not as it seemed, however; Foiles has admitted that while the sugar was real, the prop coffee “was flat Coca-Cola, which was sticky and gross.”

9. SOME NICKELODEON EXECUTIVES WANTED ALL THAT TO STEER CLEAR OF RAP.

In 1996, Steven Rifkind—then the president and CEO of Loud Records—sang All That’s praises to Billboard Magazine. “All That,” he noted, “[is] one of television’s only forums for rap and hip-hop artists since the demise of The Arsenio Hall Show.” Right from the start, this was one of the program’s major goals. “Music has always been a big part of SNL, and I wanted the same for All That,” says Robbins.

To get a sense of what his target audience liked, Robbins scrutinized the Billboard top 40 charts. He also got some inside information from a few younger relatives. “I have four nephews, ages 6 through 9, and I pay attention to what they listen to,” Robbins said in 1996. As he quickly discovered, kids and tweens at the time overwhelmingly enjoyed rap—something that Nick’s higher-ups wanted to avoid at first. “Nickelodeon thought I was crazy,” the producer recalled. “They were like, ‘Why do we have to use rap music?’” Of course, when All That’s ratings took off, those execs changed their tune.

10. ALISA REYES STOLE A KERNEL FROM THE BIG EAR OF CORN AS A SOUVENIR.  

Alisa Reyes—best remembered for playing Kiki in the Island Girls sketch—owned up to the thievery in the above YouTube interview from 2013, but it eventually ended up with Schneider. Six feet tall and famously soft-spoken, the Big Ear of Corn was written into the cast by Schneider at a very early stage in All That’s production. Looking for some “weird, random, silly element” to throw into the program, Schneider remembers that “for some reason, I thought to myself, ‘Hmmm, a giant ear of corn would look pretty funny.’” When the prop was retired, he personally stepped in to save it from being thrown away or cannibalized for some other show. Ever since, Schneider has served as the vegetable’s self-appointed guardian.

“I’ve had a few different storage rooms over the years. And I’ve always kept the Big Ear of Corn,” he said in 2016. Later that year, the maize megastar’s presence was requested at the San Diego Comic-Con. After a few minor touch-ups, the Big Ear of Corn looked good as new—and ready to meet its admiring public.

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The Muppets are Getting a Reboot (Again)
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images
Frazer Harrison, Getty Images

The Muppets have entertained audiences from television sets and movie screens. Now, The Hollywood Reporter reports the beloved characters are coming to your computer. Jim Henson's classic characters are being rebooted for Disney's new streaming service.

This isn't the first time Disney has attempted to repackage The Muppets for TV since acquiring the property in 2004. In 2015, a mockumentary-style show, simply titled The Muppets, premiered on ABC, but it was canceled after one season in light of underwhelming reviews. Disney is also producing a CGI update of the animated series Muppet Babies this March. Unlike that show, this upcoming series will star the original adult characters.

Disney has yet to announce a premiere date or even a premise for the new streaming show. Audiences can expect to see it sometime after the Netflix competitor launches in fall of 2019.

The Muppets will be accompanied by streaming versions of other classic Disney properties. Series based on Monsters Inc. (2001) and The Mighty Ducks (1992) as well as film reboots of The Parent Trap (1998) and Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989) are all expected to appear exclusively on the streaming service.

[h/t The Hollywood Reporter]

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15 Educational Facts About Old School
DreamWorks
DreamWorks

Old School starred Luke Wilson as Mitch Martin, an attorney who—after catching his girlfriend cheating, and through some real estate and bitter dean-related circumstances—becomes the leader of a not-quite-official college fraternity. Along with his fellow thirtysomething friends Bernard (Vince Vaughn) and newlywed Frank (Will Ferrell), they end up having to fight for their right to maintain their status as a party-loving frat on campus.

The film, which was released 15 years ago today, marked Vaughn’s return to major comedies and Ferrell’s first major starring role after seven years on Saturday Night Live. Here are some facts about the movie for everyone, but particularly for my boy, Blue.

1. THE IDEA ORIGINATED WITH AN AD GUY.

Writer-director Todd Phillips was talking to a friend of his from the advertising industry named Court Crandall one day. Crandall had seen and enjoyed Phillips's movie Frat House (1998) and told his director buddy, “You know what would be funny is a movie about older guys who start a fraternity of their own.” After being told by Phillips to write it, he presented Phillips with a “loose version” of the finished product.

2. SOME OF THE FRAT SHENANIGANS WERE REAL.

While Crandall received the story credit for Old School, Phillips and Scot Armstrong received the credit for writing the script. Armstrong put his own college fraternity experiences into the script. “We were in Peoria, Illinois, so it was up to us to entertain ourselves," Armstrong shared in the movie's official production notes. "A lot of ideas for Old School came from things that really happened. When it was cold, everyone would go stir crazy and it inspired some moments of brilliance. Of course, my definition of ‘brilliance' might be different from other people's.”

3. IVAN REITMAN HELPED OUT.

Ivan Reitman, director of Stripes and Ghostbusters, was an executive producer on the film. Phillips and Armstrong wrote and rewrote every day for two months at Reitman’s house, an experience Phillips described as comedy writing “boot camp.”

4. THE STUDIO DIDN’T WANT VINCE VAUGHN.

Vince Vaughn in 'Old School' (2003)
DreamWorks

It didn’t seem to make a difference to DreamWorks that Phillips and Armstrong had written the role of Bernard with Vince Vaughn in mind—the studio didn't want him. After his breakout success in Swingers, Vaughn had taken roles in dramas like the 1998 remake of Psycho. “So when Todd Phillips wanted me for Old School, the studio didn’t want me,” Vaughn told Variety in 2015. “They didn’t think I could do comedy! They said, ‘He’s a dramatic actor from smaller films.’ Todd really had to push for me.”

5. RECYCLED SHOTS OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY WERE USED.

The film was mainly shot on the Westwood campus of UCLA. The aerial shots of the fictitious Harrison University, however, were of Harvard; they had been shot for Road Trip (2000).

6. VINCE VAUGHN FANS MIGHT RECOGNIZE THE CHURCH.

In the film, Frank gets married at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Pasadena, California. Vaughn and Owen Wilson were in that same church two years later for Wedding Crashers (2005).

7. WILL FERRELL SCARED MEMBERS OF A 24-HOUR GYM.

Frank’s streaking scene was shot on a city street. As Ferrell remembered it, one of the storefronts was a 24-hour gym with Stairmasters and treadmills in the window. “I was rehearsing in a robe, and all these people are in the gym, watching me. I asked one of the production assistants, ‘Shouldn’t we tell them I’m going to be naked?’ Sure enough, I dropped my robe and there were shrieks of pure horror. After the first take, nobody was at the window anymore. I took that as a sign of approval.”

8. FERRELL REALLY WAS NAKED.

Ferrell justified it by saying it showed his character falling off the wagon. “The fact that it made sense was the reason I was really into doing it, and why I was able to commit on that level," Ferrell told the BBC. "If it was just for the sake of doing a crazy shot, then I don't think it makes sense.” Still, Ferrell needed some liquid courage, and was intimidated by the presence of Snoop Dogg.

9. ROB CORDDRY WAS NOT NAKED, BUT HE STILL HAD TO SIGN AWAY HIS NUDITY RIGHTS.

Old School marked the first major film role for Rob Corddry, who at the time was best known as a correspondent for The Daily Show. He had a jewel bag around his private parts for his nude scene, but his butt made it into the final cut. He had to sign a nudity clause, which gave the film the right to use his naked image “in any part of the universe, in any form, even that which is not devised.”

10. SNOOP DOGG AGREED TO CAMEO SO HE COULD PLAY HUGGY BEAR IN STARSKY & HUTCH.

Phillips admitted to essentially bribing the hip-hop artist/actor, using Snoop Dogg’s desire to play the street informant in the modern movie adaptation of the classic TV show (which Phillips was also directing) to his advantage. “So when I went to him I said, 'I want you to do Huggy Bear,' he was really excited. And I said, 'Oh yeah, also will you do this little thing for me in Old School a little cameo?' So he kind of had to do it I think."

11. SNOOP WANTED TO HANG OUT WITH VINCE VAUGHN ON SET, BUT NOT LUKE WILSON.

Snoop Dogg in 'Old School' (2003)
Richard Foreman, Dreamworks

Vaughn and his friends accepted an invitation to hang out in Snoop Dogg’s trailer to play video games on the last day of shooting. Vaughn recalled seeing Luke Wilson later watching the news alone in his trailer; he had not been informed of the get-together.

12. WILSON WAS TEASED BY HIS CO-STARS.

Vaughn, Wilson, and Ferrell dubbed themselves “The Wolfpack”—years before Phillips directed The Hangover—because they would always make fun of each other. A particularly stinging exchange had Ferrell refer to Legally Blonde (which Wilson had starred in) as Legally Bland. Wilson said it didn’t make him feel great. Wilson retorted by telling Ferrell that "the transition from TV to the movies isn't a very easy one, so you might just want to keep one foot back in TV just in case this whole movie thing falls through!"

13. TERRY O’QUINN SCARED HIS SONS INTO THINKING THEY WERE TRIPPING.

Terry O’Quinn (who went on to play John Locke on Lost the following year) agreed to play Goldberg, uncredited, in what was a two-day job for him. He neglected to inform his sons he was in the movie, and when they saw it, one of them called their father. “I got a call from my sons one night, and they said, ‘What were you doing in Old School? We didn’t even know you were in it!’ They said, ‘We’re sitting there, and the first time we see you, it’s, like, in a reflection in a window. And when we saw it, and we both thought we were, like, tripping or something!’”

14. THE EARMUFFS WERE IMPROVISED.

Before filming, Vaughn worked with Ferrell to figure out their characters' backstories and how they knew each other; he credited that with helping him figure out who Bernard was, which led to several ad-libbed moments. “The earmuff scene where he swears in front of the kids, and then I tell the kid to earmuff, that all is off the cuff. But that stuff is a lot easier to do when you know who you are and your circumstances, and who your characters are,” Vaughn explained.

15. FERRELL AND VAUGHN DIDN’T LOVE A SCRIPT FOR A SEQUEL.

Armstrong had written Old School Dos in 2006, which saw the frat going to Spring Break. Ferrell said that he and Vaughn read the script but felt like they would just be “kind of doing the same thing again.” Wilson, on the other hand, was excited over the new script.

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