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11 of the Most Delicious Reuben Sandwiches in the U.S.

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A classic Reuben sandwich is made of corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing served on buttered, toasted rye bread. Open-faced or closed, it's a quintessentially American sandwich, and these 11 restaurants and delis have earned a reputation for making top-notch Reubens.

1. KATZINGER'S DELICATESSEN // COLUMBUS, OHIO

Katzinger's Delicatessen has been a Columbus landmark for 30 years, and their Reuben sandwich is billed as "the sandwich that built the business." The classic comes in two sizes, and the menu also features nine variations on the Reuben—including ones with slow-cooked brisket and oven-roasted turkey—to please any taste.

2. KATZ'S DELICATESSEN // NEW YORK CITY

Katz's Delicatessen in Manhattan was founded in 1888 and regularly appears in lists of New York's best delis. (You might also recognize it from the most memorable scene of the movie When Harry Met Sally.) Katz's goes through 8000 pounds of corned beef every week, with much of it going into their Reuben sandwiches. Their corned beef is slow-cured, which takes about 30 days and gives it a particular tenderness.

3. THE BAGEL DELI // DENVER, COLORADO

If you crave an extra amount of corned beef, The Bagel Deli offers a classic, piled-high Reuben with sauerkraut stuffed between layers of meat. You can also get a Reuben with pastrami or turkey, a hot Reuben, and variations using coleslaw.

4. SKIPPER'S SMOKEHOUSE // TAMPA, FLORIDA

Skipper's Smokehouse boasts Floribbean cuisine, described as "a fusion of Caribbean, Florida, and Louisiana flavors." They serve seafood, crawfish, and alligator, yet they've built a reputation for their Blackened Grouper Reuben. This sandwich has a filet of grouper grilled with Cajun seasoning on rye with Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Thousand Island dressing.

5. NATE 'N AL OF BEVERLY HILLS DELICATESSEN // BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA

Al Mendelson and Nate Rimer opened Nate 'n Al in Beverly Hills in 1945, and Al's grandsons Mark and David run the popular deli today. Their classic Reuben—called the "Hollywood"—is a favorite, but pastrami and turkey are also options, as are sides like potato salad and onion rings.

6. ZINGERMAN'S DELICATESSEN // ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Established in 1982, Zingerman's Delicatessen serves made-to-order sandwiches with locally sourced meat and bread and dressings made on site. In 2012, Zingerman's Deli's Reuben made Food & Wine's list of Best Sandwiches in America.

7. HAM HEAVEN & DEVIL DOGS // SARASOTA, FLORIDA

When former New Yorker Rocky Rocchio moved to Sarasota, he brought his penchant for class sandwiches with him. Floridians have loved it—his Reuben at Ham Heaven & Devil Dogs was once voted best in the state.

8. CRESCENT MOON // OMAHA, NEBRASKA

One of the Reuben sandwich origin stories is that it was developed at the Blackstone Hotel in Omaha, Nebraska. The Crescent Moon Ale House, which is located just a couple of blocks down from where the former hotel stood, appropriately named its Reuben sandwich after the local landmark.

9. COURT STREET GROCERS // BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

Last year, Grub Street named Court Street Grocers as the home of the best Reuben in New York (a high honor for a town known for their deli sandwiches). Court Street Grocers, which has three New York locations, makes their own "comeback" sauce for their Reuben sandwiches, described as a spicier alternative to Russian or Thousand Island dressing. They also use locally made bread and sauerkraut and concentrate on a balance of flavors instead of how much meat their Reuben contains.

10. CANTER'S DELI // LOS ANGELES

Canter's Deli has been serving L.A. since 1931, and they say they've gone through 10 million pounds of corned beef in that time (though you can also order their Reuben with the usual alternatives—pastrami or turkey—or with a vegetarian option).

11. SAM LAGRASSA'S // BOSTON

Sam LaGrassa's tagline is "World's No. 1 Sandwiches," and its patrons—who regularly wait in long lines—probably agree. The family owned shop is only open during weekday lunch hours, but the take-out menu assures you can get your fix anytime, assuming you plan ahead. Their Jumbo Reuben, which comes on grilled pumpernickel, is also available for delivery.

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A Simple Way to Charge Your iPhone in 5 Minutes
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Spotting the “low battery” notification on your phone is usually followed by a frantic search for an outlet and further stress over the fact that you may not have time for a full charge. On iPhones, plugging your device into the wall for five minutes might result in only a modest increase of about three percent or so. But this tip from Business Insider Tech may allow you to squeeze out a little more juice.

The trick? Before charging, put your phone in Airplane Mode so that you reduce the number of energy-sucking tasks (signal searching, fielding incoming communications) your device will try and perform.

Next, take the cover off if you have one (the phone might be generating extra heat as a result). Finally, try to use an iPad adapter, which has demonstrated a faster rate of charging than the adapter that comes with your iPhone.

Do that and you’ll likely double your battery boost, from about three to six percent. It may not sound like much, but that little bit of extra juice might keep you connected until you’re able to plug it in for a full charge.

[h/t Business Insider Tech]

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Trying to Save Money? Avoid Shopping on a Smartphone
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Today, Americans do most of their shopping online—but as anyone who’s indulged in late-night retail therapy likely knows, this convenience often can come with an added cost. Trying to curb expenses, but don't want to swear off the convenience of ordering groceries in your PJs? New research shows that shopping on a desktop computer instead of a mobile phone may help you avoid making foolish purchases, according to Co. Design. Ying Zhu, a marketing professor at the University of British Columbia-Okanagan, recently led a study to measure how touchscreen technology affects consumer behavior. Published in the Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, her research found that people are more likely to make more frivolous, impulsive purchases if they’re shopping on their phones than if they’re facing a computer monitor. Zhu, along with study co-author Jeffrey Meyer of Bowling Green State University, ran a series of lab experiments on student participants to observe how different electronic devices affected shoppers’ thinking styles and intentions. Their aim was to see if subjects' purchasing goals changed when it came to buying frivolous things, like chocolate or massages, or more practical things, like food or office supplies. In one experiment, participants were randomly assigned to use a desktop or a touchscreen. Then, they were presented with an offer to purchase either a frivolous item (a $50 restaurant certificate for $30) or a useful one (a $50 grocery certificate for $30). These subjects used a three-point scale to gauge how likely they were to purchase the offer, and they also evaluated how practical or frivolous each item was. (Participants rated the restaurant certificate to be more indulgent than the grocery certificate.) Sure enough, the researchers found that participants had "significantly higher" purchase intentions for hedonic (i.e. pleasurable) products when buying on touchscreens than on desktops, according to the study. On the flip side, participants had significantly higher purchase intentions for utilitarian (i.e. practical) products while using desktops instead of touchscreens. "The playful and fun nature of the touchscreen enhances consumers' favor of hedonic products; while the logical and functional nature of a desktop endorses the consumers' preference for utilitarian products," Zhu explains in a press release. The study also found that participants using touchscreen technology scored significantly higher on "experiential thinking" than subjects using desktop computers, whereas those with desktop computers demonstrated higher scores for rational thinking. “When you’re in an experiential thinking mode, [you crave] excitement, a different experience,” Zhu explained to Co. Design. “When you’re on the desktop, with all the work emails, that interface puts you into a rational thinking style. While you’re in a rational thinking style, when you assess a product, you’ll look for something with functionality and specific uses.” Zhu’s advice for consumers looking to conserve cash? Stow away the smartphone when you’re itching to splurge on a guilty pleasure. [h/t Fast Company]

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