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11 of the Most Delicious Reuben Sandwiches in the U.S.

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A classic Reuben sandwich is made of corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing served on buttered, toasted rye bread. Open-faced or closed, it's a quintessentially American sandwich, and these 11 restaurants and delis have earned a reputation for making top-notch Reubens.

1. KATZINGER'S DELICATESSEN // COLUMBUS, OHIO

Katzinger's Delicatessen has been a Columbus landmark for 30 years, and their Reuben sandwich is billed as "the sandwich that built the business." The classic comes in two sizes, and the menu also features nine variations on the Reuben—including ones with slow-cooked brisket and oven-roasted turkey—to please any taste.

2. KATZ'S DELICATESSEN // NEW YORK CITY

Katz's Delicatessen in Manhattan was founded in 1888 and regularly appears in lists of New York's best delis. (You might also recognize it from the most memorable scene of the movie When Harry Met Sally.) Katz's goes through 8000 pounds of corned beef every week, with much of it going into their Reuben sandwiches. Their corned beef is slow-cured, which takes about 30 days and gives it a particular tenderness.

3. THE BAGEL DELI // DENVER, COLORADO

If you crave an extra amount of corned beef, The Bagel Deli offers a classic, piled-high Reuben with sauerkraut stuffed between layers of meat. You can also get a Reuben with pastrami or turkey, a hot Reuben, and variations using coleslaw.

4. SKIPPER'S SMOKEHOUSE // TAMPA, FLORIDA

Skipper's Smokehouse boasts Floribbean cuisine, described as "a fusion of Caribbean, Florida, and Louisiana flavors." They serve seafood, crawfish, and alligator, yet they've built a reputation for their Blackened Grouper Reuben. This sandwich has a filet of grouper grilled with Cajun seasoning on rye with Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Thousand Island dressing.

5. NATE 'N AL OF BEVERLY HILLS DELICATESSEN // BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA

Al Mendelson and Nate Rimer opened Nate 'n Al in Beverly Hills in 1945, and Al's grandsons Mark and David run the popular deli today. Their classic Reuben—called the "Hollywood"—is a favorite, but pastrami and turkey are also options, as are sides like potato salad and onion rings.

6. ZINGERMAN'S DELICATESSEN // ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Established in 1982, Zingerman's Delicatessen serves made-to-order sandwiches with locally sourced meat and bread and dressings made on site. In 2012, Zingerman's Deli's Reuben made Food & Wine's list of Best Sandwiches in America.

7. HAM HEAVEN & DEVIL DOGS // SARASOTA, FLORIDA

When former New Yorker Rocky Rocchio moved to Sarasota, he brought his penchant for class sandwiches with him. Floridians have loved it—his Reuben at Ham Heaven & Devil Dogs was once voted best in the state.

8. CRESCENT MOON // OMAHA, NEBRASKA

One of the Reuben sandwich origin stories is that it was developed at the Blackstone Hotel in Omaha, Nebraska. The Crescent Moon Ale House, which is located just a couple of blocks down from where the former hotel stood, appropriately named its Reuben sandwich after the local landmark.

9. COURT STREET GROCERS // BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

Last year, Grub Street named Court Street Grocers as the home of the best Reuben in New York (a high honor for a town known for their deli sandwiches). Court Street Grocers, which has three New York locations, makes their own "comeback" sauce for their Reuben sandwiches, described as a spicier alternative to Russian or Thousand Island dressing. They also use locally made bread and sauerkraut and concentrate on a balance of flavors instead of how much meat their Reuben contains.

10. CANTER'S DELI // LOS ANGELES

Canter's Deli has been serving L.A. since 1931, and they say they've gone through 10 million pounds of corned beef in that time (though you can also order their Reuben with the usual alternatives—pastrami or turkey—or with a vegetarian option).

11. SAM LAGRASSA'S // BOSTON

Sam LaGrassa's tagline is "World's No. 1 Sandwiches," and its patrons—who regularly wait in long lines—probably agree. The family owned shop is only open during weekday lunch hours, but the take-out menu assures you can get your fix anytime, assuming you plan ahead. Their Jumbo Reuben, which comes on grilled pumpernickel, is also available for delivery.

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George Orwell's 11 Tips for Proper Tea Making
Public Domain // Mendhak // CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic (Wikimedia Commons)
Public Domain // Mendhak // CC Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic (Wikimedia Commons)

More than 70 years ago, in the January 12, 1946, edition of the Evening Standard, George Orwell wrote up 11 tips for making and consuming tea. Published under the title "A Nice Cup of Tea," Orwell noted that "at least four [points] are acutely controversial." That's a bold claim!

So what does it take to make an Orwellian cup of tea? Read on.

A NICE CUP OF TEA BY GEORGE ORWELL

If you look up 'tea' in the first cookery book that comes to hand you will probably find that it is unmentioned; or at most you will find a few lines of sketchy instructions which give no ruling on several of the most important points.
This is curious, not only because tea is one of the main stays of civilization in this country, as well as in Eire, Australia and New Zealand, but because the best manner of making it is the subject of violent disputes.

When I look through my own recipe for the perfect cup of tea, I find no fewer than eleven outstanding points. On perhaps two of them there would be pretty general agreement, but at least four others are acutely controversial. Here are my own eleven rules, every one of which I regard as golden:

FIRSTLY

First of all, one should use Indian or Ceylonese tea. China tea has virtues which are not to be despised nowadays—it is economical, and one can drink it without milk—but there is not much stimulation in it. One does not feel wiser, braver or more optimistic after drinking it. Anyone who has used that comforting phrase 'a nice cup of tea' invariably means Indian tea.

SECONDLY

Secondly, tea should be made in small quantities—that is, in a teapot. Tea out of an urn is always tasteless, while army tea, made in a cauldron, tastes of grease and whitewash. The teapot should be made of china or earthenware. Silver or Britanniaware teapots produce inferior tea and enamel pots are worse; though curiously enough a pewter teapot (a rarity nowadays) is not so bad.

THIRDLY

Thirdly, the pot should be warmed beforehand. This is better done by placing it on the hob than by the usual method of swilling it out with hot water.

(Ed. note: a hob is a stove burner in this context. Depends a bit on what sort of pot you're using whether it's safe to put in on the burner!)

FOURTHLY

Fourthly, the tea should be strong. For a pot holding a quart, if you are going to fill it nearly to the brim, six heaped teaspoons would be about right. In a time of rationing, this is not an idea that can be realized on every day of the week, but I maintain that one strong cup of tea is better than twenty weak ones. All true tea lovers not only like their tea strong, but like it a little stronger with each year that passes—a fact which is recognized in the extra ration issued to old-age pensioners.

FIFTHLY

Fifthly, the tea should be put straight into the pot. No strainers, muslin bags or other devices to imprison the tea. In some countries teapots are fitted with little dangling baskets under the spout to catch the stray leaves, which are supposed to be harmful. Actually one can swallow tea-leaves in considerable quantities without ill effect, and if the tea is not loose in the pot it never infuses properly.

SIXTHLY

Sixthly, one should take the teapot to the kettle and not the other way about. The water should be actually boiling at the moment of impact, which means that one should keep it on the flame while one pours. Some people add that one should only use water that has been freshly brought to the boil, but I have never noticed that it makes any difference.

SEVENTHLY

Seventhly, after making the tea, one should stir it, or better, give the pot a good shake, afterwards allowing the leaves to settle.

EIGHTHLY

Eighthly, one should drink out of a good breakfast cup—that is, the cylindrical type of cup, not the flat, shallow type. The breakfast cup holds more, and with the other kind one's tea is always half cold before one has well started on it.

NINTHLY

Ninthly, one should pour the cream off the milk before using it for tea. Milk that is too creamy always gives tea a sickly taste.

TENTHLY

Tenthly, one should pour tea into the cup first. This is one of the most controversial points of all; indeed in every family in Britain there are probably two schools of thought on the subject. The milk-first school can bring forward some fairly strong arguments, but I maintain that my own argument is unanswerable. This is that, by putting the tea in first and stirring as one pours, one can exactly regulate the amount of milk whereas one is liable to put in too much milk if one does it the other way round.

LASTLY (SADLY NOT ELEVENTHLY)

Lastly, tea—unless one is drinking it in the Russian style—should be drunk without sugar. I know very well that I am in a minority here. But still, how can you call yourself a true tea lover if you destroy the flavour of your tea by putting sugar in it? It would be equally reasonable to put in pepper or salt. Tea is meant to be bitter, just as beer is meant to be bitter. If you sweeten it, you are no longer tasting the tea, you are merely tasting the sugar; you could make a very similar drink by dissolving sugar in plain hot water.

Some people would answer that they don't like tea in itself, that they only drink it in order to be warmed and stimulated, and they need sugar to take the taste away. To those misguided people I would say: Try drinking tea without sugar for, say, a fortnight and it is very unlikely that you will ever want to ruin your tea by sweetening it again.

Orwell concludes:

These are not the only controversial points to arise in connexion with tea drinking, but they are sufficient to show how subtilized the whole business has become. There is also the mysterious social etiquette surrounding the teapot (why is it considered vulgar to drink out of your saucer, for instance?) and much might be written about the subsidiary uses of tealeaves, such as telling fortunes, predicting the arrival of visitors, feeding rabbits, healing burns and sweeping the carpet. It is worth paying attention to such details as warming the pot and using water that is really boiling, so as to make quite sure of wringing out of one's ration the twenty good, strong cups of that two ounces, properly handled, ought to represent.

Let the arguing commence, tea lovers!

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Job Alert: The UK Needs a Chicken Nugget Taste-Tester

Do you like highly-processed chicken molded into mushy, breaded bites? Are you willing to relocate to England? Can your palate distinguish a savory nugget from a mediocre one? Your dream job awaits, AJC.com reports.

British retail chain B&M recently posted a job listing calling for a "chicken nugget connoisseur" to help the company get feedback on their new line of frozen food products. The chosen applicant—or applicants—will get a monthly voucher worth £25 ($34) to spend on frozen goods. Job duties consist of eating nuggets and other items and then providing B&M feedback.

The post describes the position as "temporary," so it's unlikely there's opportunity for advancement. If you care to apply, B&M will accept a paragraph describing yourself and why you’d be good for the job—though if you actually have a CV full of previous nugget-related positions, we're confident they'd love to see it.

[h/t AJC.com]

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