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11 of the Most Delicious Reuben Sandwiches in the U.S.

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A classic Reuben sandwich is made of corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing served on buttered, toasted rye bread. Open-faced or closed, it's a quintessentially American sandwich, and these 11 restaurants and delis have earned a reputation for making top-notch Reubens.

1. KATZINGER'S DELICATESSEN // COLUMBUS, OHIO

Katzinger's Delicatessen has been a Columbus landmark for 30 years, and their Reuben sandwich is billed as "the sandwich that built the business." The classic comes in two sizes, and the menu also features nine variations on the Reuben—including ones with slow-cooked brisket and oven-roasted turkey—to please any taste.

2. KATZ'S DELICATESSEN // NEW YORK CITY

Katz's Delicatessen in Manhattan was founded in 1888 and regularly appears in lists of New York's best delis. (You might also recognize it from the most memorable scene of the movie When Harry Met Sally.) Katz's goes through 8000 pounds of corned beef every week, with much of it going into their Reuben sandwiches. Their corned beef is slow-cured, which takes about 30 days and gives it a particular tenderness.

3. THE BAGEL DELI // DENVER, COLORADO

If you crave an extra amount of corned beef, The Bagel Deli offers a classic, piled-high Reuben with sauerkraut stuffed between layers of meat. You can also get a Reuben with pastrami or turkey, a hot Reuben, and variations using coleslaw.

4. SKIPPER'S SMOKEHOUSE // TAMPA, FLORIDA

Skipper's Smokehouse boasts Floribbean cuisine, described as "a fusion of Caribbean, Florida, and Louisiana flavors." They serve seafood, crawfish, and alligator, yet they've built a reputation for their Blackened Grouper Reuben. This sandwich has a filet of grouper grilled with Cajun seasoning on rye with Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Thousand Island dressing.

5. NATE 'N AL OF BEVERLY HILLS DELICATESSEN // BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA

Al Mendelson and Nate Rimer opened Nate 'n Al in Beverly Hills in 1945, and Al's grandsons Mark and David run the popular deli today. Their classic Reuben—called the "Hollywood"—is a favorite, but pastrami and turkey are also options, as are sides like potato salad and onion rings.

6. ZINGERMAN'S DELICATESSEN // ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

Established in 1982, Zingerman's Delicatessen serves made-to-order sandwiches with locally sourced meat and bread and dressings made on site. In 2012, Zingerman's Deli's Reuben made Food & Wine's list of Best Sandwiches in America.

7. HAM HEAVEN & DEVIL DOGS // SARASOTA, FLORIDA

When former New Yorker Rocky Rocchio moved to Sarasota, he brought his penchant for class sandwiches with him. Floridians have loved it—his Reuben at Ham Heaven & Devil Dogs was once voted best in the state.

8. CRESCENT MOON // OMAHA, NEBRASKA

One of the Reuben sandwich origin stories is that it was developed at the Blackstone Hotel in Omaha, Nebraska. The Crescent Moon Ale House, which is located just a couple of blocks down from where the former hotel stood, appropriately named its Reuben sandwich after the local landmark.

9. COURT STREET GROCERS // BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

Last year, Grub Street named Court Street Grocers as the home of the best Reuben in New York (a high honor for a town known for their deli sandwiches). Court Street Grocers, which has three New York locations, makes their own "comeback" sauce for their Reuben sandwiches, described as a spicier alternative to Russian or Thousand Island dressing. They also use locally made bread and sauerkraut and concentrate on a balance of flavors instead of how much meat their Reuben contains.

10. CANTER'S DELI // LOS ANGELES

Canter's Deli has been serving L.A. since 1931, and they say they've gone through 10 million pounds of corned beef in that time (though you can also order their Reuben with the usual alternatives—pastrami or turkey—or with a vegetarian option).

11. SAM LAGRASSA'S // BOSTON

Sam LaGrassa's tagline is "World's No. 1 Sandwiches," and its patrons—who regularly wait in long lines—probably agree. The family owned shop is only open during weekday lunch hours, but the take-out menu assures you can get your fix anytime, assuming you plan ahead. Their Jumbo Reuben, which comes on grilled pumpernickel, is also available for delivery.

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An Eco-Friendly Startup Is Converting Banana Peels Into Fabric for Clothes
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A new startup has found a unique way to tackle pollution while simultaneously supporting sustainable fashion. Circular Systems, a “clean-tech new materials company,” is transforming banana byproducts, pineapple leaves, sugarcane bark, and flax and hemp stalk into natural fabrics, according to Fast Company.

These five crops alone meet more than twice the global demand for fibers, and the conversion process provides farmers with an additional revenue stream, according to the company’s website. Fashion brands like H&M and Levi’s are already in talks with Circular Systems to incorporate some of these sustainable fibers into their clothes.

Additionally, Circular Systems recycles used clothing to make new fibers, and another technology called Orbital spins those textile scraps and crop byproducts together to create a durable type of yarn.

People eat about 100 billion bananas per year globally, resulting in 270 million tons of discarded peels. (Americans alone consume 3.2 billion pounds of bananas annually.) Although peels are biodegradable, they emit methane—a greenhouse gas—during decomposition. Crop burning, on the other hand, is even worse because it causes significant air pollution.

As Fast Company points out, using leaves and bark to create clothing may seem pretty groundbreaking, but 97 percent of the fibers used in clothes in 1960 were natural. Today, that figure is only 35 percent.

However, Circular Systems has joined a growing number of fashion brands and textile companies that are seeking out sustainable alternatives. Gucci has started incorporating a biodegradable material into some of its sunglasses, Bolt Threads invented a material made from mushroom filaments, and pineapple “leather” has been around for a couple of years now.

[h/t Fast Company]

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Apeel
New Plant-Based Coating Can Keep Your Avocados Fresh for Twice as Long
Apeel
Apeel

Thanks to a food technology startup called Apeel Sciences, eating fresh avocados will soon be a lot easier. The Bill Gates–backed company has developed a coating designed to keep avocados fresh for up to twice as long as traditional fruit, Bloomberg reports, and these long-lasting avocados will soon be available at 100 grocery stores across the Midwestern U.S. Thirty or so of the grocery stores involved in the limited rollout of the Apeel avocado will be Costcos, so feel free to buy in bulk.

Getting an avocado to a U.S. grocery store is more complicated than it sounds; the majority of avocados sold in the U.S. come from California or Mexico, making it tricky to get fruit to the Midwest or New England at just the right moment in an avocado’s life cycle.

Apeel’s coating is made of plant material—lipids and glycerolipids derived from peels, seeds, and pulp—that acts as an extra layer of protective peel on the fruit, keeping water in and oxygen out, and thus reducing spoilage. (Oxidation is the reason that your sliced avocados and apples brown after they’ve been exposed to the air for a while.) The tasteless coating comes in a powder that fruit producers mix with water and then dip their fruit into.

A side-by-side comparison of a coated and uncoated avocado after 30 days, with the uncoated avocado looking spoiled and the coated one looking fresh
Apeel

According to Apeel, coating a piece of produce in this way can keep it fresh for two to three times longer than normal without any sort of refrigeration or preservatives. This not only allows consumers a few more days to make use of their produce before it goes bad, reducing food waste, but can allow producers to ship their goods to farther-away markets without refrigeration.

Avocados are the first of Apeel's fruits to make it to market, but there are plans to debut other Apeel-coated produce varieties in the future. The company has tested its technology on apples, artichokes, mangoes, and several other fruits and vegetables.

[h/t Bloomberg]

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