CLOSE
Original image
doniazade//LEGO Ideas

A Revolutionary Toy Idea: 'Hamilton: The LEGO Set' 

Original image
doniazade//LEGO Ideas

Can't score Hamilton tickets? Thanks to one fan's LEGO-loving husband, you may soon be able to recreate the magic of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s historical musical in your very own living room.

Earlier this month, LEGO Ideas community member doniazade submitted a Hamilton-inspired LEGO set to the LEGO Ideas website. It's a miniature replica of the musical’s stage, complete with tiny figures of Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, the Schuyler sisters, and other characters. If 10,000 different fans support the design, it will become eligible for review to become a real-life LEGO product.

Not surprisingly, doniazade is a huge Hamilton fan. "I don't remember exactly how my Hamilton journey began, just that, despite being neither American nor a musical fan, I got hooked to the cast recording immediately," doniazade explains in her submission to the LEGO Ideas website. "Some months later, I travelled to the greatest city in the world to see it with my own two eyes. And last Christmas, my husband gave me the most thoughtful gift: a custom Hamilton Lego set…"

As of March 7, the Hamilton LEGO set—which doniazade has dubbed "Hamilton: A Lego Musical"—had already reached more than 2500 supporters, meaning it’s well on its way toward meeting the coveted 10,000 number. ("The plan is to fan this spark into a flame," to quote a fitting line from the Hamilton song "My Shot.")

Check out some pictures of the Hamilton LEGO set below.

All images courtesy of doniazade//LEGO Ideas

arrow
Art
100 Street Artists Turned This College Dorm in Paris Into a Graffiti Gallery

This summer, a college dorm in Paris received a colorful—albeit temporary—interior makeover after dozens of graffiti artists joined forces to adorn its walls, ceilings, and floors with collages, murals, and painted designs.

As My Modern Met reports, the artists spent three weeks painting the student residence at the Cité Internationale Universitaire as part of Rehab 2, an urban festival held from June 16 to July 16. The school will soon undergo renovations, so the artworks aren’t long for this world—but luckily for street art fans, pictures of the vibrant graffiti have been posted on social media for our prolonged enjoyment.

Check some of them out below:

[h/t My Modern Met]

Original image
Natural History Museum
arrow
Animals
London's Natural History Museum Has a New Star Attraction: An Amazing Blue Whale Skeleton
Original image
Natural History Museum

In January 2017, London’s Natural History Museum said goodbye to Dippy, the Diplodocus dinosaur skeleton cast that had presided over the institution’s grand entrance hall since 1979. Dippy is scheduled to tour the UK from early 2018 to late 2020—and taking his place in Hintze Hall, The Guardian reports, is a majestic 82-foot blue whale skeleton named Hope.

Hope was officially unveiled to the public on July 14. The massive skeleton hangs suspended from the hall’s ceiling, providing visitors with a 360-degree view of the largest animal ever to have lived on Earth.

Technically, Hope isn’t a new addition to the Natural History Museum, which was first established in 1881. The skeleton is from a whale that beached itself at the mouth of Ireland's Wexford Harbor in 1891 after being injured by a whaler. A town merchant sold the skeleton to the museum for just a couple of hundred pounds, and in 1934, the bones were displayed in the Mammal Hall, where they hung over a life-size blue whale model.

The whale skeleton remained in the Mammal Hall until 2015, when museum workers began preparing the skeleton for its grand debut in Hintze Hall. "Whilst working on the 221 bones we uncovered past conservation treatments, such as the use of newspaper in the 1930s to fill the gaps between the vertebrae," Lorraine Cornish, the museum's head of conservation, said in a statement. "And we were able to use new methods for the first time, including 3D printing a small number of bones missing from the right flipper."

Once restoration was complete, Hope was suspended above Hintze Hall in a diving position. There she hangs as one of the museum’s new major attractions—and as a reminder of humanity’s power to conserve endangered species.

"The Blue Whale as a centerpiece tells a hopeful story about our ability to create a sustainable future for ourselves and other species," according to a museum press release. "Humans were responsible for both pushing the Blue Whale to the brink of extinction but also responsible for its protection and recovery. We hope that this remarkable story about the Blue Whale will be told by parents and grandparents to their children for many years to come, inspiring people to think differently about the natural world."

Check out some pictures of Hope below.

 “Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

“Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

“Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

“Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

[h/t Design Boom]

SECTIONS

More from mental floss studios