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5-Year-Old Edith Fuller Is the Scripps National Spelling Bee’s Youngest Speller Ever

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“J-N-A-N-A. Jnana.”

That’s the word (a Hindu noun meaning “knowledge acquired through meditation and study as a means of reaching Brahman,” according to Dictionary.com) that won 5-year-old Edith Fuller the 2017 Scripps Green Country Regional Spelling Bee in Tulsa on Saturday—and earned her a place on the stage at this year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee, making her the competition’s youngest-ever competitor.

Fuller beat out more than 50 other kids, some of them middle schoolers, to win the competition and advance to what is largely considered the Super Bowl of Spelling. “I feel thankful,” Fuller told Tulsa World after her historic win.

“It’s fun to share her with everyone,” Edith’s mom, Annie, added. “I knew she’d be a novelty, so I’m proud she held her own.”

Annie said it was only last summer that the family noticed Edith’s talent with words. They were having dinner together when Edith spelled restaurant, without ever having been taught the word. “We knew there was something special there,” Annie said.

Edith has been practicing her spelling ever since, which was clear to anyone in the audience. Among the words she triumphed in spelling over the more-than-four-hour competition were sevruga, Panglossian, virgule, and Eocene.

Fuller will advance to the 90th annual Scripps National Spelling Bee, which kicks off on May 28, 2017. Can you spell adorable?

[h/t: Cosmopolitan]

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Cahoots Malone
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Revisit Your Favorite '90s Screensaver With This Free Game
Cahoots Malone
Cahoots Malone

In the '90s, a significant amount of computing power was devoted to generating endless brick mazes on Windows 95. The screensaver has since become iconic, and now nostalgic Microsoft fans can relive it in a whole new way. As Motherboard reports, the animation has been re-imagined into a video game called Screensaver Subterfuge.

Instead of watching passively as your computer weaves through the maze, you’re leading the journey this time around. You play as a kid hacker who’s been charged with retrieving sensitive data hidden in the screensaver of Windows 95 before devious infomancers can get to it first. The gameplay is pretty simple: Use the arrow keys to navigate the halls and press Q and click the mouse to change their design. Finding a giant smiley face takes you to level two, and finding the briefcase icon ends the game. There are also lots of giant rats in this version of the screensaver.

Screensaver Subterfuge was designed by Cahoots Malone as part of the PROCJAM 2017 generative software showcase. You can download it for free for Windows, macOS, and Linux from his website, or if playing a game sounds like too much work, you can always watch videos of the old screensaver on a loop.

[h/t Motherboard]

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Pop Culture
The Princess Ride: Here's What a Princess Bride Theme Park Attraction Might Look Like
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MGM

Do you fight the urge to say “Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya” when introducing yourself? Have you spent the past 30 years mispronouncing the word “marriage”? If so, you may be a diehard fan of The Princess Bride. The cult film (and the book on which it’s based) has inspired board games, merchandise, and countless pop culture references. Now, two theme park designers from Universal have conceived the inconceivable. As Nerdist reports, Jon Plsek and Olivia West have designed the plans for a hypothetical attraction called “The Princess Ride.

Their idea follows the classic river boat ride structure and adds highlights from the movie around each corner. After watching Buttercup and Wesley’s love story unfold, riders are taken past the Cliffs of Insanity, through the Fire Swamp, and into the Pit of Despair. The climax unfolds at Prince Humperdinck’s castle and leads up to the two protagonists riding off into the sunset. The last thing the passengers see is Miracle Max and Valerie waving goodbye saying, “Hope ya had fun stormin’ the castle!”

The ride’s designers make a living turning stories into thrilling attractions. Plsek works as a concept artist for Universal Creative, the group behind Universal’s theme parks, and West works there as a concept writer. While The Princess Ride was just a fun side project for the pair, it isn’t hard to imagine their ride bringing Princess Bride fans to the parks in real life.

For more of Jon Plesk’s concept rides inspired by classics like Dr. Strangelove (1964) and National Lampoon’s Vacation (1983), check out his website.

[h/t Nerdist]

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