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Timberland

Timberland Is Making Shoes and Bags From Recycled Plastic Bottles

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Timberland

Americans go through about 50 billion water bottles a year, but only recycle a fraction of that colossal total. Now, more companies and organizations are looking for creative ways to repurpose the waste that hydration leaves behind. Possibly taking cues from Adidas, Timberland has started making its own environmentally-conscious footwear.

The shoe company has partnered with Pennsylvania-based manufacturer Thread (and their Ground to Good fabric) to transform used water bottles into wearable shoes, bags, and shirts. The Timberland x Thread collaboration is taking bottles from the streets and landfills of Haiti in an effort to promote sustainability and create new jobs for a nation in need. 

Here's how it works: Over 1300 Haitians help to collect the water bottles and sell them to one of 50 Haitian-owned and operated collection centers. The centers then sell the plastic to Haiti Recycling and ECSSA in Port-au-Prince, where it's washed, shredded, and sent to the United States. The shredded plastic is then melted and turned into fabric, which Timberland buys and uses to create new clothing. 

“At Thread, we believe that dignified jobs cure poverty—and our fabric creates those jobs,” Ian Rosenberger, founder of Thread, said in a statement. “Our partnership with Timberland marks a seismic shift in the fashion industry, combining Timberland’s large supply chain and loyal customer base with Thread’s responsible, transparent approach to creating premium fabrics and vital jobs in the developing world. The Timberland x Thread collection is a major step towards improving the way our clothes are made.”

[h/t Inhabitat]

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HuskeeCup
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Food
Drink Your Coffee Out of a Cup Made From Coffee Waste
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HuskeeCup

Your coffee habit isn’t exactly good for the environment. For one thing, 30 to 50 percent of the original coffee plant harvested (by weight) ends up as agricultural waste, and there aren’t many uses for coffee husks and pulp. While coffee pulp can be made into flour, and in Ethiopia husks are used to brew a type of coffee called bruno, typically most of the byproducts of your morning coffee go to waste.

Huskee has another use for coffee husks. The company makes stylish coffee cups, returning coffee back to its original home inside the husk, in a sense. The dishwasher-friendly and microwavable cups are made of husks from coffee farms in Yunnan, China. The material won’t burn your hands, but it keeps your coffee warm as well as a ceramic mug would.

A stack of black cups and saucers of various sizes on an espresso machine.
HuskeeCup

Designed for both home and restaurant use, the cups come in 6-ounce, 8-ounce, and 12-ounce sizes with saucers. The company is also working on a lid so that the cups can be used on the go.

Huskee estimates that a single coffee drinker is responsible for around 6.6 pounds of husk waste per year, which doesn’t sound like much until you begin to consider how many coffee lovers there are in the world. That’s somewhere around 1.49 million tons per year, according to the company. Though coffee husks are sometimes used for animal feed, we could use a few more ways to recycle them. And if it happens to be in the form of an attractive coffee mug, so be it.

A four-pack of cups is about $37 on Kickstarter. The product is scheduled to ship before February 2018.

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Art
100 Street Artists Turned This College Dorm in Paris Into a Graffiti Gallery

This summer, a college dorm in Paris received a colorful—albeit temporary—interior makeover after dozens of graffiti artists joined forces to adorn its walls, ceilings, and floors with collages, murals, and painted designs.

As My Modern Met reports, the artists spent three weeks painting the student residence at the Cité Internationale Universitaire as part of Rehab 2, an urban festival held from June 16 to July 16. The school will soon undergo renovations, so the artworks aren’t long for this world—but luckily for street art fans, pictures of the vibrant graffiti have been posted on social media for our prolonged enjoyment.

Check some of them out below:

[h/t My Modern Met]

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