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Nokia
Nokia

Here's Your First Look at the Revamped Nokia 3310

Nokia
Nokia

If the pricey, complicated smartphones of today have you yearning for simpler times, Nokia may have the solution. Their popular 3310 was discontinued in 2005, but earlier this month, news broke that a new-and-improved version of the old-school device would debut at the Mobile World Congress tech show in Barcelona. 

As CNET reports, the rumors are true: The 3310 is back, with a sleek redesign and a few technical upgrades.The phone’s relaunch comes courtesy of HMD Global, a start-up formed by former Nokia executives. They acquired the necessary intellectual property (including branding and technology) to make the Finnish company’s iconic phones, according to CNBC.

"We were interacting with consumers and asked what was the best ever Nokia device that you have ever had and out of that questionnaire it was the 3310,” HMD Global CEO Arto Nummela told CNBC. “And then we thought, ‘OK, what the heck, let's have some fun and create this.’”

The original Nokia 3310 was beloved for many reasons: It entertained us with games like Snake II, came equipped with a stopwatch and calculator, and was impressively durable and long-lasting. For the most part, the new 3310—an Android device—is similar to its predecessor (there's even a new version of Snake), but with several key improvements. For example, the phone now has 22 hours of talk time—10 times more than the original—and its battery lasts a whole month on standby mode. The device also has a tiny, 2-megapixel camera, and a thinner, rounder design. You can purchase it in the original midnight blue and grey color schemes, or opt for a bright red, yellow, or grey phone. (Sorry, you can’t swap the case with one you purchased from a mall kiosk.)

What the Nokia 3310 isn't is a smartphone. It’s 2.5G, so you can technically get online, but if you’re obsessed with apps and social media, it likely isn’t the phone for you. On the other hand, it may be your best friend if you’re looking to disconnect from the digital landscape but don’t want to forsake the convenience of owning a mobile device.

The new Nokia 3310 is priced at around $50, and is slated for release later this year. Get an up-close look at the revamped device below.

[h/t CNET]

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History
The Queen of Code: Remembering Grace Hopper
By Lynn Gilbert, CC BY-SA 4.0, Wikimedia Commons

Grace Hopper was a computing pioneer. She coined the term "computer bug" after finding a moth stuck inside Harvard's Mark II computer in 1947 (which in turn led to the term "debug," meaning solving problems in computer code). She did the foundational work that led to the COBOL programming language, used in mission-critical computing systems for decades (including today). She worked in World War II using very early computers to help end the war. When she retired from the U.S. Navy at age 79, she was the oldest active-duty commissioned officer in the service. Hopper, who was born on this day in 1906, is a hero of computing and a brilliant role model, but not many people know her story.

In this short documentary from FiveThirtyEight, directed by Gillian Jacobs, we learned about Grace Hopper from several biographers, archival photographs, and footage of her speaking in her later years. If you've never heard of Grace Hopper, or you're even vaguely interested in the history of computing or women in computing, this is a must-watch:

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Google
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Animals
Watch Christmas Island’s Annual Crab Migration on Google Street View
Google
Google

Every year, the 45 million or so red crabs on the remote Australian territory of Christmas Island migrate en masse from their forest burrows down to the ocean to mate, and so the female crabs can release their eggs into the sea to hatch. The migration starts during the fall, and the number of crabs on the beach often peaks in December. This year, you don’t have to be on Christmas Island to witness the spectacular crustacean event, as New Atlas reports. You can see it on Google Street View.

Watching the sheer density of crabs scuttling across roads, boardwalks, and beaches is a rare visual treat. According to the Google blog, this year’s crabtacular finale is forecasted for December 16, and Parks Australia crab expert Alasdair Grigg will be there with the Street View Trekker to capture it. That is likely to be the day when crab populations on the beaches will be at their peak, giving you the best view of the action.

Crabs scuttle across the forest floor while a man with a Google Street View Trekker walks behind them.
Google

Google Street View is already a repository for a number of armchair travel experiences. You can digitally explore remote locations in Antarctica, recreations of ancient cities, and even the International Space Station. You can essentially see the whole world without ever logging off your computer.

Sadly, because Street View isn’t live, you won’t be able to see the migration as it happens. The image collection won’t be available until sometime in early 2018. But it’ll be worth the wait, we promise. For a sneak preview, watch Parks Australia’s video of the 2012 event here.

[h/t New Atlas]

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